[SOLVED] Install cooler Master AIO cooler on GPU?

Sep 14, 2019
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So hello! I'm having a evga GTX 1050 SC on one of my cases and it goes really hot like70-80c under full load.(And it's air cooped with one fan) so I'm having a idea that I open the heatsink completely and install a cooler Master captain 120/240(because the installation parts fits my GPU completely and it's nice) like cpu normally and liquid cool it.
Anyone did cool a GPU using AIO? Will that decrease the temp? Does it worth
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
Yes, just adding liquid cooling is only displacing where the thermal load leaves the GPU. Also, a 1050 at 70-80C isn't overheating - max thermal before throttling is 97C according to Nvidia's spec page for the 1050. https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/geforce/products/10series/geforce-gtx-1050/ (see the 'view full specs' link)

This still points to airflow being a problem, not the cooler. Here is a test:

Remove the side panel of the case and orient a desk or other household fan to blow air directly into the open case with the fan set to the highest setting.

See what your temps are.

If temps remain relatively the same (within 1-2C) then it is time to address the cooling solution on the components still registering as 'too warm' (remember 70-80C isn't overheating, you as a human think this is hot, but PC hardware does not always agree).

If temps drop dramatically (5C or more) then you have an airflow issue needs to be addressed with your case.
 

Phaaze88

Reputable
Herald
A GTX 1050 overheating? Sounds like you have other problems, that a liquid cooler wouldn't fix. Liquid cooling is a hybrid of air cooling, so if your case cooling is poor, it won't do much better.
I have a 1080Ti, which draws over 3x the power of a 1050, and it never sees over 65C.

What is your case, and how are your case fans set up?
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
Yes, just adding liquid cooling is only displacing where the thermal load leaves the GPU. Also, a 1050 at 70-80C isn't overheating - max thermal before throttling is 97C according to Nvidia's spec page for the 1050. https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/geforce/products/10series/geforce-gtx-1050/ (see the 'view full specs' link)

This still points to airflow being a problem, not the cooler. Here is a test:

Remove the side panel of the case and orient a desk or other household fan to blow air directly into the open case with the fan set to the highest setting.

See what your temps are.

If temps remain relatively the same (within 1-2C) then it is time to address the cooling solution on the components still registering as 'too warm' (remember 70-80C isn't overheating, you as a human think this is hot, but PC hardware does not always agree).

If temps drop dramatically (5C or more) then you have an airflow issue needs to be addressed with your case.
 
Sep 14, 2019
27
0
30
0
Yes, just adding liquid cooling is only displacing where the thermal load leaves the GPU. Also, a 1050 at 70-80C isn't overheating - max thermal before throttling is 97C according to Nvidia's spec page for the 1050. https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/geforce/products/10series/geforce-gtx-1050/ (see the 'view full specs' link)

This still points to airflow being a problem, not the cooler. Here is a test:

Remove the side panel of the case and orient a desk or other household fan to blow air directly into the open case with the fan set to the highest setting.

See what your temps are.

If temps remain relatively the same (within 1-2C) then it is time to address the cooling solution on the components still registering as 'too warm' (remember 70-80C isn't overheating, you as a human think this is hot, but PC hardware does not always agree).

If temps drop dramatically (5C or more) then you have an airflow issue needs to be addressed with your case.
Wow thank you so much! My airflow was pushing from top and exhausting from front and rear. Then I changed to exhaust from top and pushing from front. Also my mobo temp decreased too!
 

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