Question Installed New Ram Kit, All games started stuttering!

Jan 16, 2020
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I'm running a Ryzen 3600 and RTX 2080 on a B450f gaming motherboard. I recently just upgraded my RAM kit from a 3000mhz Cl16-18-18-48 to a 3200mhz Cl 14-14-14-34 16gb set. I benchmarked Shadow of the Tomb Raider and immediately noticed almost a 8fps gain, also ran Timespy and Cinebench. All with D.O.C.P enabled. No issues. Then I booted up Battlefield 5 and Siege. I noticed in game, there were huge stutters everytime a large explosion or new Player or Bot was introduced on screen. I've updated my Bios. I've cleaned my registry. I clocked everything back to default and stock. And even clocked Ram down. Same story. Do I have a bad module? It seems CPU related but I set everything to stock and had no problems prior to new ram. Utilization of Cpu was around 45 to 55% in game. What am I missing?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
What do you mean by "I cleaned my registry"?

How, exactly, did you "clean" your registry? I suspect this could be a big part of the problem. Generally speaking, unless you are VERY, VERY knowledgeable, you don't "clean" your registry and if you've used one of the automatic utilities like CC Cleaner, then that is it's own problem and programs like that should steadfastly be avoided no matter than a great number of lugheads will tell you it's great and that they swear by it. It is a big fracking problem waiting to happen is what it is.

Start with the basics.

Which DIMM slots, EXACTLY, are your memory modules installed in? They SHOULD be installed in the second and fourth slots over from the motherboard if you have a 2 DIMM configuration. It does not matter if your motherboard uses a different naming convention for the DIMM slots, it will STILL be the 2nd and 4th slots for two DIMM installation. That is for ALL DDR4 dual channel motherboards.




If you DO have them installed in the correct slots, and you are NOT also using the old kit along with the new kit, then it would be wise to do a hard reset of the BIOS and then go back INTO the BIOS and reconfigure any custom settings such as fan profiles or the memory D.O.C.P profile configuration afterwards. Assuming of course that you DO have the MOST recent motherboard BIOS already installed.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.



Next, make sure you have THIS specific chipset driver installed. Doesn't matter if you already do, it won't hurt to reinstall it just to be sure you are on the correct version.

https://www.amd.com/en/support/chipsets/amd-socket-am4/b450


It's a good idea as well to visit your motherboard product page and update any other drivers, such as LAN/Ethernet and Audio drivers as well. Do NOT install the chipset driver listed on your motherboard product page. The AMD supplied driver is the best choice for any non-laptop or notebook system. For those systems, then the manufacturer supplied driver is usually the best choice.

It's important to update the network adapter (LAN/Ethernet or WiFi) and Audio drivers because those drivers CAN affect other drivers if there is a problem with compatibility in the existing version. Don't disregard a driver update because you think it is unrelated to the problem you are having. ANY and ALL drivers can have an affect on ALL or ANY other driver in some cases.


If none of that is helpful, then it might be necessary to do a clean install of Windows because fiddling around in the registry, even using a supposedly "safe" utility, can result in problems which there are no remedies for.
 
Jan 16, 2020
2
0
10
0
Already figured it out, I know the basics lol. I had a GPU profile hot key set to A somehow, every time I strafed the graphics clock was resetting causing a stutter.
What do you mean by "I cleaned my registry"?

How, exactly, did you "clean" your registry? I suspect this could be a big part of the problem. Generally speaking, unless you are VERY, VERY knowledgeable, you don't "clean" your registry and if you've used one of the automatic utilities like CC Cleaner, then that is it's own problem and programs like that should steadfastly be avoided no matter than a great number of lugheads will tell you it's great and that they swear by it. It is a big fracking problem waiting to happen is what it is.

Start with the basics.

Which DIMM slots, EXACTLY, are your memory modules installed in? They SHOULD be installed in the second and fourth slots over from the motherboard if you have a 2 DIMM configuration. It does not matter if your motherboard uses a different naming convention for the DIMM slots, it will STILL be the 2nd and 4th slots for two DIMM installation. That is for ALL DDR4 dual channel motherboards.




If you DO have them installed in the correct slots, and you are NOT also using the old kit along with the new kit, then it would be wise to do a hard reset of the BIOS and then go back INTO the BIOS and reconfigure any custom settings such as fan profiles or the memory D.O.C.P profile configuration afterwards. Assuming of course that you DO have the MOST recent motherboard BIOS already installed.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.



Next, make sure you have THIS specific chipset driver installed. Doesn't matter if you already do, it won't hurt to reinstall it just to be sure you are on the correct version.

https://www.amd.com/en/support/chipsets/amd-socket-am4/b450


It's a good idea as well to visit your motherboard product page and update any other drivers, such as LAN/Ethernet and Audio drivers as well. Do NOT install the chipset driver listed on your motherboard product page. The AMD supplied driver is the best choice for any non-laptop or notebook system. For those systems, then the manufacturer supplied driver is usually the best choice.

It's important to update the network adapter (LAN/Ethernet or WiFi) and Audio drivers because those drivers CAN affect other drivers if there is a problem with compatibility in the existing version. Don't disregard a driver update because you think it is unrelated to the problem you are having. ANY and ALL drivers can have an affect on ALL or ANY other driver in some cases.


If none of that is helpful, then it might be necessary to do a clean install of Windows because fiddling around in the registry, even using a supposedly "safe" utility, can result in problems which there are no remedies for.
What do you mean by "I cleaned my registry"?

How, exactly, did you "clean" your registry? I suspect this could be a big part of the problem. Generally speaking, unless you are VERY, VERY knowledgeable, you don't "clean" your registry and if you've used one of the automatic utilities like CC Cleaner, then that is it's own problem and programs like that should steadfastly be avoided no matter than a great number of lugheads will tell you it's great and that they swear by it. It is a big fracking problem waiting to happen is what it is.

Start with the basics.

Which DIMM slots, EXACTLY, are your memory modules installed in? They SHOULD be installed in the second and fourth slots over from the motherboard if you have a 2 DIMM configuration. It does not matter if your motherboard uses a different naming convention for the DIMM slots, it will STILL be the 2nd and 4th slots for two DIMM installation. That is for ALL DDR4 dual channel motherboards.




If you DO have them installed in the correct slots, and you are NOT also using the old kit along with the new kit, then it would be wise to do a hard reset of the BIOS and then go back INTO the BIOS and reconfigure any custom settings such as fan profiles or the memory D.O.C.P profile configuration afterwards. Assuming of course that you DO have the MOST recent motherboard BIOS already installed.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.



Next, make sure you have THIS specific chipset driver installed. Doesn't matter if you already do, it won't hurt to reinstall it just to be sure you are on the correct version.

https://www.amd.com/en/support/chipsets/amd-socket-am4/b450


It's a good idea as well to visit your motherboard product page and update any other drivers, such as LAN/Ethernet and Audio drivers as well. Do NOT install the chipset driver listed on your motherboard product page. The AMD supplied driver is the best choice for any non-laptop or notebook system. For those systems, then the manufacturer supplied driver is usually the best choice.

It's important to update the network adapter (LAN/Ethernet or WiFi) and Audio drivers because those drivers CAN affect other drivers if there is a problem with compatibility in the existing version. Don't disregard a driver update because you think it is unrelated to the problem you are having. ANY and ALL drivers can have an affect on ALL or ANY other driver in some cases.


If none of that is helpful, then it might be necessary to do a clean install of Windows because fiddling around in the registry, even using a supposedly "safe" utility, can result in problems which there are no remedies for.
 

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