[SOLVED] Installed new ram. PC wont post with resizable bar enabled?

Jul 8, 2022
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Alright I have
Asus TUF Gaming B550- Pro
Ryzen 7 5800x3d
XFX SWIFT 210 RX 6600
I removed 2x 8gb Ballistix 3000mhz (16gb total)
and installed TeamGroup 2x16gb 3600mhz

I had to reset cmos to get the computer to post. I enabled DOCP. Computer seems stable. But I cannot enable resizable bar. If i enable resizable bar the computer wont post. What could be the problem here?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
This is how I recommend resetting the BIOS when it's necessary, for future reference. And by "necessary", I mean anytime you change memory kits, different graphics card or different CPU model.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.
 
Reactions: AndrewGlenJennings

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
If the system works normally otherwise, then I'd leave it off. It's pretty much a waste of time except in a very few exceptions anyhow.

https://www.rockpapershotgun.com/what-is-resizable-bar-and-should-you-use-it

Also, since the problems didn't exist until you changed memory, I assume, it would likely be a good idea to test your memory configuration using Memtest just to make sure that's not the culprit.


Memtest86


Go to the Passmark software website and download the USB Memtest86 free version. You can do the optical disk version too if for some reason you cannot use a bootable USB flash drive.


Create bootable media using the downloaded Memtest86. Once you have done that, go into your BIOS and configure the system to boot to the USB drive that contains the Memtest86 USB media or the optical drive if using that option.


You CAN use Memtest86+, as they've recently updated the program after MANY years of no updates, but for the purpose of this guide I recommend using the Passmark version as this is a tried and true utility while I've not had the opportunity to investigate the reliability of the latest 86+ release as compared to Memtest86. Possibly, consider using Memtest86+ as simply a secondary test to Memtest86, much as Windows memory diagnostic utility and Prime95 Blend or custom modes can be used for a second opinion utility.


Create a bootable USB Flash drive:

1. Download the Windows MemTest86 USB image.

2. Right click on the downloaded file and select the "Extract to Here" option. This places the USB image and imaging tool into the current folder.

3. Run the included imageUSB tool, it should already have the image file selected and you just need to choose which connected USB drive to turn into a bootable drive. Note that this will erase all data on the drive.



No memory should ever fail to pass Memtest86 when it is at the default configuration that the system sets it at when you start out or do a clear CMOS by removing the CMOS battery for five minutes.

Best method for testing memory is to first run four passes of Memtest86, all 11 tests, WITH the memory at the default configuration. This should be done BEFORE setting the memory to the XMP profile settings. The paid version has 13 tests but the free version only has tests 1-10 and test 13. So run full passes of all 11 tests. Be sure to download the latest version of Memtest86. Memtest86+ has not been updated in MANY years. It is NO-WISE as good as regular Memtest86 from Passmark software.

If there are ANY errors, at all, then the memory configuration is not stable. Bumping the DRAM voltage up slightly may resolve that OR you may need to make adjustments to the primary timings. There are very few secondary or tertiary timings that should be altered. I can tell you about those if you are trying to tighten your memory timings.

If you cannot pass Memtest86 with the memory at the XMP configuration settings then I would recommend restoring the memory to the default JEDEC SPD of 1333/2133mhz (Depending on your platform and memory type) with everything left on the auto/default configuration and running Memtest86 over again. If it completes the four full passes without error you can try again with the XMP settings but first try bumping the DRAM voltage up once again by whatever small increment the motherboard will allow you to increase it by. If it passes, great, move on to the Prime95 testing.

If it still fails, try once again bumping the voltage if you are still within the maximum allowable voltage for your memory type and test again. If it still fails, you are likely going to need more advanced help with configuring your primary timings and should return the memory to the default configuration until you can sort it out.

If the memory will not pass Memtest86 for four passes when it IS at the stock default non-XMP configuration, even after a minor bump in voltage, then there is likely something physically wrong with one or more of the memory modules and I'd recommend running Memtest on each individual module, separately, to determine which module is causing the issue. If you find a single module that is faulty you should contact the seller or the memory manufacturer and have them replace the memory as a SET. Memory comes matched for a reason as I made clear earlier and if you let them replace only one module rather than the entire set you are back to using unmatched memory which is an open door for problems with incompatible memory.

Be aware that you SHOULD run Memtest86 to test the memory at the default, non-XMP, non-custom profile settings BEFORE ever making any changes to the memory configuration so that you will know if the problem is a setting or is a physical problem with the memory.
 
Jul 8, 2022
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I did run 4 passes of memtest86 at the default configuration as soon as the computer actually booted. I got zero errors. I am going to run now with docp settings. Let me see what I get when I run 4 passed with docp configuration.
 
Jul 8, 2022
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I am running memtest overnight, but i think the ram is fine. I entered bios to change my boot priority to run memtest. Changed no settings. Exited bios and could not post. Posted into safe mode and turned off docp. So i think the issue has nothing to do with resizable bar, it was just a coincidence. Is it common for a computer to post sometimes but not others, with no settings changed? I will have some time to try things tomorrow.
 
Jul 8, 2022
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I do have the most recent bio installed. Also when i enable resizable bary motherboard also enabled above 4g automatically. My voltage is already at 1.45 with docp settings, i dont think i can turn it up anymore.
 
Jul 8, 2022
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So i did get 1 error on pass 1 of memtest86 with xmp settings. This should be enough to receive a refund from the vendor right? Memtest is still running so i dont know if i will get more errors.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Not necessarily. But possibly. Not all memory errors are the fault of the memory. Can also be motherboard or CPU, due to bent pins or other issues, but if the sticks work fine at the default configuration and do with their XMP configuration, then it usually can only be that there is a physical problem with that kit OR it is simply not fully compatible with the motherboard it's being used in. Not all memory kits are validated for use with all motherboards, even if they are "standards" compatible, ie, DDR4, DDR5, etc., and with Teamgroup it's very difficult to validate compatibility as they don't have an actual compatibility list addressed by motherboard model like G.Skill, Corsair and Crucial do.

Maybe try to get a refund and then get a G.Skill kit that is either listed by G.Skill as compatible with your specific board or is on the motherboard QVL list.
 
Jul 8, 2022
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This is awesome. I took out the new ram and put the old ram back in. Now the computer wont start at all. Monitor wont turn on. the mother board DRam light turn yellow immediately. Ive re-set the ram many times. I tried pressing the bios flashback button on the back of the computer.
 
Jul 8, 2022
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Clear CMOS header? turn off the computer and unplug the power cord
use a metal object to short the two pins
plug the power cord and turn on the computer
hold down del during boot process and enter setup to reenter data

i never did this during the original ram install. I am going to try this now
 
Jul 8, 2022
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This did not help. I tried it a few times. No change. I tried taking the original ram out again. did the clear cmos header process. and installed the new ram. turned on the computer and got the same thing straight to yellow on the dram light. no display. What else can i try.
 

DRagor

Illustrious
Since it does the same with both RAM kits (and both were working) we can safely assume it is something else that is failing. It can be motherboard, it can be CPU, or it can be a problem with cooler installation. Start with the last one - loose the cooler screws a bit (but not to the point it starts moving) and see if it makes any difference.
 
Jul 8, 2022
31
1
45
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Since it does the same with both RAM kits (and both were working) we can safely assume it is something else that is failing. It can be motherboard, it can be CPU, or it can be a problem with cooler installation. Start with the last one - loose the cooler screws a bit (but not to the point it starts moving) and see if it makes any difference.
Aha, So I removed the cmos battery, held down the power button for 15 seconds, shorted out the cmos pins, and let the computer sit for about 10 minutes. also in that time i loosened the screws a little on the heatsink. When i turned the computer on It booted with a message about uefi recovery.
At this point I am scared to death to do much. I never reset cmos by shorting out those pins when i installed the new ram originally, but It did eventually post. and i played elden ring for like 8 hours, before rebooting to run mentest86 over night. So, I am pretty sure I can get a full refund on the new ram. What do you guys think. Should i even bother trying the new ram again? more carefully this time? I am not doing anything at this point until i am sure of how to proceed.
 

DRagor

Illustrious
Sometimes boards can be a bit stubborn, needing extra steps to make sure CMOS is reset. And as you saw yourself it is good practice to do it whenever you swap components, RAM particularly. You should not be scared, nothing you did was wrong. nothing got damaged it seems, it is just sometimes not that plug and play as promised.
Personally I would give new RAM another try. But I can understand if you feel tired and angry at this point.
 
Reactions: AndrewGlenJennings

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
This is how I recommend resetting the BIOS when it's necessary, for future reference. And by "necessary", I mean anytime you change memory kits, different graphics card or different CPU model.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.
 
Reactions: AndrewGlenJennings

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