Question Installed second set of RAM, now computer continuously restarts.

Sep 11, 2019
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Hi All,

I recently installed a second set of RAM (2 x DIMM) into a computer I recently built. It already had two sticks in there (2 x 4GB modules), and I wanted to install another pair of the exact same RAM to up the total to 16 GB. I took all the standard precautions (anti-static strap, did work in non-carpeted room), but when I restarted the machine, it would run for 30 seconds or so and then reboot on its own. No image was displayed to either monitor connected; it would just run for a bit, and restart. All fans will spin (case fans, CPU fan, PSU fan) and RGB features are still powered, but no OS or UEFI will display to the monitors. If I don’t turn it off, it will just continue to reboot, ad infinitum.

To troubleshoot, here is what I’ve tried so far:

  1. Removed new RAM and tried starting with only the old kit slotted in its original slots.
  2. Removed & reset CMOS battery.
  3. Removed video card and tried restart (video card disconnected from mobo & psu)
  4. Removed all RAM sticks and tried to restart (not sure if this would really help, but thought I would try it, while I was in the case).
  5. Attempted to find light on motherboard to see if it was red, green, or otherwise, but the board doesn’t appear to have one.
None of this changed my results.

My current thoughts are that this is related to either the motherboard or PSU. That being said, I’m not sure how likely it could be the PSU, as everything seems to get power (anybody disagree with this assumption?). One thing I may want to mention is that the PSU is universal for voltage and has an American plug, but I live in South Korea, and plug that into a standard universal power strip (which does NOT have surge protection, I believe). I doubt this affects anything, but thought it may be worth noting.

Another thing I researched is that the motherboard only has official support for 2 DIMM of the RAM I bought, according to the memory QVL. I found this out after the fact, but my understanding is that 4 sticks will probably work, but only 2 are officially supported. Would attempting to install the extra 2 cause a catastrophic failure?
(DIMMs are PV48G300C6K)

https://www.asrock.com/MB/AMD/B450M Pro4/index.us.asp#MemoryPR

Anybody have any ideas of how to fix this, or to at least narrow down what the culprit is???

Parts listed below:

Part Picker Link:
https://pcpartpicker.com/user/gangel79/saved/#view=wCYhgs

CPU
AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor
CPU Cooler
Deepcool GAMMAXX GT 29.5 CFM CPU Cooler
Motherboard
ASRock B450M Pro4-F Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard
Memory
Patriot Viper 4 8 GB (2 x 4 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory
Memory
Patriot Viper 4 8 GB (2 x 4 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory
Storage
Seagate Barracuda 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive
Storage
Crucial P1 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive
Video Card
Zotac GeForce GTX 1660 6 GB GAMING Video Card
Case
Cooler Master MasterBox Q500L ATX Mid Tower Case
Power Supply
EVGA BT 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply
Case Fan
Deepcool RF 120 (3 in 1) 56.5 CFM 120 mm Fans
 
Yeah, sounds like your PSU. 450w is very light for this build, and that particular unit isn't great.

It could be the incompatibility of the DIMMS. Although same brand model, because they are not a kit you just know if they will work. Hindsight is a wonderful thing, YOu may still be able to get them to work. XMP/DOCP might be problematic, but trying via the bios and manually setting the DIMMS for 2933 should get them to work.

In the meantime, sort out that PSU.
 
Reactions: righteoustrash
Sep 11, 2019
17
3
15
0
Yeah, sounds like your PSU. 450w is very light for this build, and that particular unit isn't great.

It could be the incompatibility of the DIMMS. Although same brand model, because they are not a kit you just know if they will work. Hindsight is a wonderful thing, YOu may still be able to get them to work. XMP/DOCP might be problematic, but trying via the bios and manually setting the DIMMS for 2933 should get them to work.

In the meantime, sort out that PSU.
Regarding the wattage of the build, Part Picker rated it at 314W. Am I to understand that those estimates aren't valid?

Thing is, too, when I pulled the new RAM and started it back up in the original configuration, it didn't start then, either (worked without any problems before this). If the PSU is the problem, what could a temporary install of new RAM have done to damage it?
 
Well, as much as those wattage calcs are useful as a guide, they are not wholly accurate.

For example, they take the stock TDP of parts to guestimate.

So a Ryzen 2600, although a 65w part, only draws 65w at stock/base speeds. At load/boost speeds it can be upward of 90w. If you OC it can go up to about 120w. Same with a GPU.

Yes, you might not actually in all scenarios, use more than circa 350w, but if you OC your CPU/GPU/stress test, then you could easily push past.

You are just not giving much headroom. Its best to have a bit more headroom. It could be if the PSU is older than 3 years (it's warranty), it may not supply it's rated power. It's not a great PSU in of itself. Not the worst, but made with inferior components. I wouldn't advise anyone to put it in a shiny Ryzen build like yours. There is a reason it's a budget PSU. For the moment see how it goes, and consider replacing with an EVGA G2/G3, Seasonic Focus Plus Gold, that will last you 7-10 years, and give you peace of mind it won't fry your hardware.

On the ram thing, it's possible with populating 4 dimms the IMC/SOC needs more juice to power the 4 dimms. If you can get to the bios you might want to look at that. If that was enough to tip over the PSU, I couldn't say, but it's possible.
 
Reactions: righteoustrash
You did not buy identical ram.
Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
A motherboard must manage all the ram using the same specs of voltage, cas and speed.
The internal workings are designed for the capacity of the kit.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
Some motherboards, can be very sensitive to this.
This is more difficult when more sticks are involved.

What to do?
First, see if there is a motherboard bios update that addresses ram compatibility.

Next, I would return the 2 x 4gb kit if I could.
Buy a supported 2 x 8gb kit
Verify support in the motherboard qvl list or on the patriot ram selection app for your motherboard.
You will have your desired 16gb. ryzen ram is dual channel so no loss there.
Sell your old ram or keep it as a spare.

My only suggestion otherwise is to try to increase the ram voltage in the bios.
Sometimes that works.
 
Last edited:
Sep 11, 2019
17
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On the ram thing, it's possible with populating 4 dimms the IMC/SOC needs more juice to power the 4 dimms. If you can get to the bios you might want to look at that. If that was enough to tip over the PSU, I couldn't say, but it's possible.
So, just to clarify - you think it could be possible that installing extra RAM caused some permanent damage to the PSU, causing it to fail even in the original config?
 
Sep 11, 2019
17
3
15
0
You did not buy identical ram.
Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
A motherboard must manage all the ram using the same specs of voltage, cas and speed.
The internal workings are designed for the capacity of the kit.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
Some motherboards, can be very sensitive to this.
This is more difficult when more sticks are involved.

What to do?
First, see if there is a motherboard bios update that addresses ram compatibility.

Next, I would return the 2 x 4gb kit if I could.
Buy a supported 2 x 8gb kit
Verify support in the motherboard qvl list or on the patriot ram selection app for your motherboard.
You will have your desired 16gb. ryzen ram is dual channel so no loss there.
Sell your old ram or keep it as a spare.

My only suggestion otherwise is to try to increase the ram voltage in the bios.
Sometimes that works.
What I'm not currently understanding is why, when I remove the new RAM, it still doesn't start. Do you think installing the new sticks caused some permanent damage?
 
So, just to clarify - you think it could be possible that installing extra RAM caused some permanent damage to the PSU, causing it to fail even in the original config?
No, thats not what I'm saying, just that it's possible that the PSU is just not providing enough power. Not that installing ram has damaged PSU. It's possible the PSU is actually failing. How old is the PSU?

On the installation, it is possible to damage the DIMM or the mobo socket if wrongly inserted, but at least you should be able to try the other slots, or one slot at a time, with just a single DIMM populated.
 
Reactions: righteoustrash
Sep 11, 2019
17
3
15
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No, thats not what I'm saying, just that it's possible that the PSU is just not providing enough power. Not that installing ram has damaged PSU. It's possible the PSU is actually failing. How old is the PSU?

On the installation, it is possible to damage the DIMM or the mobo socket if wrongly inserted, but at least you should be able to try the other slots, or one slot at a time, with just a single DIMM populated.
The PSU (and all other components) are around a month old. I bought them all at once for the initial build. The only thing I've added since then are the two extra sticks of RAM and the 3TB HDD (HDD has been installed for around 2 weeks).

If this issue is due to the PSU supplying insufficient power, what doesn't make sense to me is why did it work perfectly fine before, but fail to supply sufficient power after the attempted RAM addition? I've taken the two sticks out, and it still fails. I've even disconnected all unnecessary components from the motherboard, in an attempt to reduce the power draw from the mobo, and still get the same results.
 
Yeah, i don't see how the two dimms could have had that impact on the PSU. With everything bought new, it just leaving me scratching my head a little.

IMO the quickest way to resolve the issues is to begin swapping out parts until you get the bad one. I'd think it's the PSU, so first port of call for me would be to maybe get a lend of another to test, bring to a local repair shop and get them t swap it out, or buy a new one.

No hardware is infallible, and so any of mobo, CPU, PSU, ram, can potentially be DOA or fail pretty quickly. It's not unusual at all. It happens.
 
Reactions: righteoustrash
Sep 11, 2019
17
3
15
0
Yeah, i don't see how the two dimms could have had that impact on the PSU. With everything bought new, it just leaving me scratching my head a little.

IMO the quickest way to resolve the issues is to begin swapping out parts until you get the bad one. I'd think it's the PSU, so first port of call for me would be to maybe get a lend of another to test, bring to a local repair shop and get them t swap it out, or buy a new one.

No hardware is infallible, and so any of mobo, CPU, PSU, ram, can potentially be DOA or fail pretty quickly. It's not unusual at all. It happens.
It looks like testing the PSU is probably my best bet. A guy I work with says he can bring in a PSU for testing, so I think I'll take him up on that.

Thanks for your help. I'll post the results of any updates.
 
Reactions: keith12
I see no way that you could have damaged a psu regardless of any ram change.
Yes, the psu may have failed(it is not one of the best) .
Testing with a known good psu is about the only way to check that issue.

It takes some force to properly seat a ram stick.
If removing the new ram leaves you without proper functioning, there must be something else done to cause a problem.
 
Sep 11, 2019
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So, my coworker brought in his functional PSU, and we tested with that (his PSU was a Corsair platinum rated 700 or 750 W unit).

Behavior was the exact same. Tried with one and two of the original RAM sticks, and no difference...

Seems like, at this point, it can only be the motherboard. I've put in for a warranty via the retailer (Amazon), and will likely be getting that swapped out.
 
Sep 11, 2019
17
3
15
0
Well, as much as those wattage calcs are useful as a guide, they are not wholly accurate.

For example, they take the stock TDP of parts to guestimate.

So a Ryzen 2600, although a 65w part, only draws 65w at stock/base speeds. At load/boost speeds it can be upward of 90w. If you OC it can go up to about 120w. Same with a GPU.

Yes, you might not actually in all scenarios, use more than circa 350w, but if you OC your CPU/GPU/stress test, then you could easily push past.

You are just not giving much headroom. Its best to have a bit more headroom. It could be if the PSU is older than 3 years (it's warranty), it may not supply it's rated power. It's not a great PSU in of itself. Not the worst, but made with inferior components. I wouldn't advise anyone to put it in a shiny Ryzen build like yours. There is a reason it's a budget PSU. For the moment see how it goes, and consider replacing with an EVGA G2/G3, Seasonic Focus Plus Gold, that will last you 7-10 years, and give you peace of mind it won't fry your hardware.

On the ram thing, it's possible with populating 4 dimms the IMC/SOC needs more juice to power the 4 dimms. If you can get to the bios you might want to look at that. If that was enough to tip over the PSU, I couldn't say, but it's possible.
Looking at some other PSUs right now...what would you recommend for wattage? Would 550 W cut it?
 

lynx1021

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Feb 17, 2016
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Is the motherboard supported properly on the standoffs and are they in the right places? It is possible if there were some traces on the board that had connections that were not up to standard, just pushing the ram in place might have finished them off. It may be a good thing you found out now. I had a computer come in for repair the other day only had two screws in the mother board and one was the wrong thread! What a pain.
 

lynx1021

Reputable
Feb 17, 2016
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Looked at the Patriot memory finder and it did not show any memory for your board, the highest it went in the B's was B250
I would look at the ASrock QVL but I can't from work, My company thinks it is a "Sketchy" Site, LOL, I can go to Asus, Gigabyte and all the rest?
 
Last edited:
Sep 11, 2019
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So, status update....

I got the replacement motherboard back from ASRock a couple of weeks ago. Reassembled everything the way it was before, with a few exceptions:

  1. Went ahead and got 2 x 8 GB sticks of the same model RAM to replace the 2 x 4 GB.
  2. Upgraded the PSU to a Seasonic Focus Plus 80 plus gold 550 W unit (already tested against PSU failure, but I thought I'd just be safe and get something a bit better quality).
Computer works like it did before, now. Seems extreme, but ultimately, plugging in the extra RAM fizzled something on the MOBO.
 

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