Installing a GT220 for Physx, is it worth it?

Muskiet

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I'm close to ordering a system with an ASUS P8Z68-V motherboard, 16 Gb DDR3 and a GTX 560 Ti 1GB video card.
Then I looked into Physx and remembered that I have a GT 220 512Mb installed in my current pc.
My question is though if it is worth it to plug it into the new motherboard for Physx purposes.
The way I understand it is that this second card will force the first one into 8x speed at all times, is this very noticeable when running software that is not using Physx?
I'm also wondering if a 750 Watt psu will be enough?
 
I disagree wholeheartedly, so does THG. The most common comment after experiencing PhysX is that ya don't miss until you have experienced it. The following link addresses the issue and also answers ya question about the 220:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/batman-arkham-asylum,2465-11.html

Turning on PhysX isn't necessary for gameplay, and you'll never miss it if you don't see the effects. However, when PhysX is enabled, it adds superlative nuances and really creates some “wow” moments. The chunky explosions, cloth effects, paper, fog, and environmental detail enhancements are very cool.

Once hardware-accelerated PhysX is enabled, this is another matter entirely, and those of you who want the best high resolution PhysX performance will need to consider an Nvidia graphics card more powerful than the GeForce GTX 260 or a dedicated PhysX card such as the GeForce GT 220. There is a high price to pay for PhysX performance, but I have to admit that the eye candy is a lot of fun to watch. Once you've turned it on, it's not something you'll turn off if your hardware can handle it.

The good news here is that a GeForce GT 220 can be had for as little as $65 online, and as a dedicated PhysX card, it will guarantee that the High PhysX setting won't bottleneck performance.

It's a rather old article so with 220s to be had for as little as $30, I would say the "high price" part no longer applies.

But don't take mine or anyone else's word for it, watch the video and decide whether it's worth it for you.

http://www.firingsquad.com/hardware/batman_arkham_asylum_physx_performance/page2.asp

With regard to the x16 x8 issue, you don't "have to" be stuck at x8 x8 by adding the 2nd card. Adding an NF200 chip to the MoBo (adds $20 to MoBo cost with same features). There is no impact at all below the level of say a 560....at that point and above we start to see some impact. This article addresses the topic though not in the detail I would have preferred:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/p67-gaming-3-way-sli-three-card-crossfire,2910-17.html

While the NF200 doesn’t completely solve the dearth of PCIe lanes available on LGA 1155 platforms, its ability to send identical data to multiple cards makes it perfect for SLI and CrossFire. That benefit, when combined with the Sandy Bridge processor’s superior performance and overclocking capabilities, slams the lid on the coffin for X58 gaming. Anyone who needs the added flexibility of X58 to host other devices, such as high-end drive controllers or six-core processors in a workstation environment, must bow to the gaming superiority of NF200-equiped Sandy Bridge motherboards like Asus' P8P67 WS Revolution.

You will note in the article that some games are only affected by a few fps, others like STALKER, the impact can be as high as 10%. Where I see more of an impact is on minimum frame rates.

You already own the card so the "investment" is not an issue. No reason why ya can't use it when it's an advantage and take it out of the picture if ya should find an instance where ya see an impact.

The 750 watt size is a great choice as it will not only handle the 560 / 220 combo but it will also handle another 560 in SLI as a future upgrade.....the 560's scaling is superb.

BTW, I'd suggest the 900Mhz version of the 560 with the bigger coolers .... I have had great success with the Asus model, getting 7 outta 8 tom 1000Mhz w/o needing t adjust voltages.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&IsNodeId=1&Description=560%20ti%20900Mhz&bop=And&Order=PRICE&PageSize=20
 

Muskiet

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Thanx all for the input and especially Jack for the detailed explanations.
I don't game all that much, but It's great to know that I can basically plug my 220 in for some extra effects when they're available without me noticing much of a difference, if any, with software that doesn't use Physx.
It basically beats leaving the 220 in a corner in the garage and since I have a passively cooled version of the 220 it wouldn't even raise the noise level :) .

As for what 260 Ti I was looking for:
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=7192161&Sku=G452-0560