Intel 3D XPoint, Pictured: Microsoft Joins The Party

Status
Not open for further replies.

ZolaIII

Honorable
Sep 26, 2013
176
0
10,690
1
It will probably be the same story as with FPGA integrated Xeon's, that they will ship only to the biggest direct costumers like Google. This is bad for a computing generally & it's becoming a habit. To be honest I didn't expect much from the Intel but I am disappointed with silence from Micron from whom I expected a real effort on commercialization.
 

DrakeFS

Reputable
Aug 11, 2014
95
0
4,640
1
It will probably be the same story as with FPGA integrated Xeon's, that they will ship only to the biggest direct costumers like Google. This is bad for a computing generally & it's becoming a habit. To be honest I didn't expect much from the Intel but I am disappointed with silence from Micron from whom I expected a real effort on commercialization.
If you go by the initial release info provided from Intel, Optane will be the branding of its consumer 3D Xpoint offerings. Supposedly we (consumers) will be seeing 3D Xpoint SSDs at some point (which I hope live up to the hype, 70k IOPs at a queue depth of 1 will be amazing for gaming machines).
 

PaulyAlcorn

Reputable
Sep 1, 2015
25
0
4,530
0
I agree that as a block device (storage essentially) 3D XPoint will definitely be great for high-performance PC's, but I think that it is telling that all of the work to use the new memory as DRAM (byte-addressable) is in the server realm - they didn't mention any changes to Windows 10.
 

RamCity

Reputable
Feb 4, 2015
30
0
4,560
5
This is the most exciting development in storage tech (for me at least) since M.2 PCIe SSD's. So from a consumer perspective, if I understand this correctly, once 3D XPoint SSD's become a reality, Microsoft needs to add the SCM-awareness to NTFS/ReFS so that we can actually use the hardware in a system, plus motherboard manufacturers need to get on board and add NVDIMM sockets. Or will the NVDIMM's work in existing DDR4 sockets? (I couldn't figure that out from the other 3D XPoint article)
 

PaulyAlcorn

Reputable
Sep 1, 2015
25
0
4,530
0
The 3D XPoint products will come in two flavors - one will be a simple SSD, much like the 2.5" and M.2 we have today. It will work just as a normal SSD would - plug and play.
The other flavor allows it to function as DRAM, or system memory. This type (shown in the article) of device (an NVDIMM) will require SCM awareness.

It appears from the direction things are going that using it as DRAM in a PC will not happen, it will likely only be for servers. However, good news for us, they will bring it out as regular storage devices to replace/supplement SSDs/HDDs.
 

CRamseyer

Honorable
Jan 25, 2015
409
0
10,790
3
With the high cost per gigabit I see this technology used as a tier 0 cache for slower TLC-based SSDs. This would increase the endurance of low cost TLC and do a better job of masking native TLC write performance.

I think the die will be expensive at first because Intel and Micron displayed a wafer at a launch event. I didn't break out a ruler or take exact measurements but the number of die per wafer was much lower than regular NAND flash.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS

Latest posts