Intel Broadwell CPUs May Still Find A Home In Small Form Factor Systems

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Eh that's a bit iffy since mini itx cases in general can support high end video cards no problem. If there were more ultra small mini itx cases that couldn't support a video card, then broadwell would work well in those.
 
Eh that's a bit iffy since mini itx cases in general can support high end video cards no problem. If there were more ultra small mini itx cases that couldn't support a video card, then broadwell would work well in those.
There are larger mini-ITX cases, but there are a lot which can't fit a full sized GPU either. The ones supporting a full sized GPU are the exception more than they are the rule.
 

LifeIsOnTheWire

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The i5 and i7 will not find many customers in the HTPC world, as the article suggests.

HTPC builders know that if they are spending more than $250 building an HTPC, they should be making sure to include support for hardware decoding of h265. Nobody is going to spend $600 building an HTPC that barely supports software decoding of h265.

Anyone wanting h265 hardware decoding right now is either buying a GTX 960, or waiting for some lower-end Skylake CPUs to hit the market.
 


Agreed. While 25+fps is defiantly a very good performance increase, I don't see it as being a 50% improvement.
 


I see you are also using firefox auto correct..... almost all my posts end up ....defiantly
 

Cryio

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Im not a mathematician, but "i7-5775c achieved a whopping 89.1 fps, while Skylake's i7-6700k only managed 56.7. That is an enormous 57.1 percent performance gap."

Can someone clarify what is meant here?
It means Broadwell's iGPU is 57% faster than Skylake's iGPU.
 

smelly_feet

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Re: "will likely end up filling a small niche in the HTPC world"
... yeah. Incredibly small niche.


Even smaller now that Mediacentre's been discontinued.

Maybe a niche in the next revision of the wii?


 


This is fairly basic math. Our tests of the i7-5775c achieved 89.1 FPS. The i7-6700k achieved 56.7.
You can determine what percentage 89.1 FPS is of 56.7 by dividing 56.7 by 89.1. So:
89.1/56.7= 1.571428571428571

Move the decimal and round to the nearest tenth, and you get 157.1 percent. So the i7-5775c achieves 157.1 percent of the graphics performance of the i7-6700k in that specific benchmark. Or you can just say the i7-5775c had 57.1 percent higher graphical performance.
 


Ok thanks for the info. I was just viewing it off the top of my head. That makes sense now.
 

dwatterworth

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A price to performance number should be included. The 5775c suddenly is at the bottom of the chart. It would be cheaper to just buy one of the devices capable of streaming gaming content from a true gaming PC than it would be to use this confusing chip. Now an i3 below $200 with the same iGPU however...bit of a different market perhaps.
 

GearUp

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A TIVO with decent capacity is not much cheaper. I wish there was a separate Home Gaming PC sector to limit the confusion. The theater must come from using TVs as the display but anything over 42 inches at 1920x1080 seems odd to me if also used for video.
Even the best I7 can't handle some strategy games which segments the market more. I'm still looking at options like this since Windows Media Center still has 3-5 years life left, so that I can free up a case.
 

jlwitt

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Hmmm... I wonder why these chips have such strange differences? Maybe because they are COMPLETELY different chips.

Of course the Skylake 6700K crushes the Broadwell 5575C; it has the same number of cores, but they are 700MHz faster.

Of course the Broadwell 5575C crushes the Skylake 6700K in on board GPU; it has twice the execution units and has onboard cache. For graphics, the Skylake scored 2.363 per execution unit and the Broadwell only scored 1.856 per execution unit, even with the extra cache.

Basically if you aren't ever buying a graphics card, the 5775C is a decent choice. Or you could wait for the Skylake CPUs that have the Iris Pro Graphics 5800 as the integrated graphics, it has 72 execution units, with a cache.

i7 5775C, 3.3GHz, BOX : $377.00
Iris Pro Graphics 6200, GT3e - 48 execution units, 883.2 GFLOPS, 300MHz - 1.15GHz, 128MB onboard

i7 6700K, 4 GHz, BOX : $350.00
HD Graphics 530, GT2 - 24 execution units, 441.6 GFLOPS, 350MHz - 1.15GHz
 


Not sure how you are getting these are completely different chips? The text in the article as well as the graph from the benchmark clearly show the i7-5775c and the i7-6700k.

For the other things you mentioned in your comment, I basically said all of that in the article. I mentioned the i7-5775c has a significantly lower clock speed than the i7-4790k, which I mentioned to help explain why its CPU performance is lower than the i7-4790k. I didn't really feel the need to state that the i7-5775c is lower clocked than the i7-6700k, as that is Intel's fastest desktop processor currently available. It is also clocked slightly slower than the i7-4790k. As this article wasn't focused on CPU performance, and we already have a review of Skylake available that analyzes this, I didn't feel the need to talk about it at length.

As for the graphics side of the chips, Intel has already announced the entire Skylake product lineup. Intel doesn't currently plan to release a desktop Skylake CPU with its top end graphics solution. It plans to use at best the Intel Graphics 530, which has only 24 EUs and lacks the L4 cache like the i7-5775c has.

Something else you will want to double check, Iris Pro Graphics 5800 does not exist. The naming suggests that if it did, that it would be a Broadwell iGPU, but again it does not exist. Intel has changed its GPU naming method starting with Skylake, which is why the i7-6700k has the Intel Graphics 530.
 

Haravikk

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I still don't see the point; continuing with the release of Broadwell would make more sense if it were at least compatible with more than a small handful of Haswell motherboards, but as usual Intel decided to change the socket and introduce compatibility issues. The systems where Broadwell would be ideal would Thin Mini-ITX systems, which tend to be very compact, or even passively cooled, however I don't believe there are any Broadwell compatible boards (and probably won't be).

As soon as Intel realised there were production issues they should have started looking at whether they could make the parts compatible with Haswell boards. Actually, that's not true, they never should have been incompatible in the first place, but to release more Broadwell parts now is pointless.

Skylake is plenty efficient enough to work in small form factor systems, and motherboard manufacturers are going to be focusing their efforts on supporting Skylake processors. Broadwell just doesn't offer enough of an advantage to take it over Haswell parts that are dropping in price, or waiting for Skylake.
 

RazberyBandit

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I see you are also using firefox auto correct..... almost all my posts end up ....defiantly
Then stop trying to spell "definitely" with an "A" in it like so: definately. LOL
 

willywash

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The reason I purchased the I7- 5775c recently and placed it in a mini itx M350 case with external power supply was because I didn't intend to purchase a discrete graphic card, obviously since it wouldn't fit anyhow. It's almost completely silent PC. I'm basically using it for CS6 and other video/audio creative tasks.
 
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