intel cC0 vs. cB0 stepping (0683 vs. 0686)

G

Guest

Guest
Hi all,

I read THG article about 1GHz P !!! a long time ago.
I remember THG said 1GHz P !!! is an overclocked CPU.

I want to know if the cC0 stepping of Pentium !!! still using
an overclocked technic to get to 1GHz or not.

Also, what other different from cB0 to cC0 stepping.
I heard about cC0 unable to do SMP. Is it true?

(I'm waiting for DDR P4... Rambuss Die... DDR rule)

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jclw

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According to my Intel PIII datasheet cC0 was the first stepping to go up to PIII-1000.

cC0 is SMP capable in both SECC2 and FC-PGA
 

Crashman

Polypheme
Editor
cCO is the "overclocked" stepping. It is 1.70v. cBO is the standard setting, it is 1.65v. The 1GHz PIII is availble in both flavors. I think they had to refine their manufacturing process to get the 1GHz cBO version.

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G

Guest

Guest
Thank's for the SMP info. I just want to make sure that FC-PGA cC0 is SMP before buying it.

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G

Guest

Guest
>cCO is the "overclocked" stepping.

Really??
I thought cC0 fixed the 'overclock' things??

>It is 1.70v. cBO is the standard setting,
>it is 1.65v. The 1GHz PIII is availble in
>both flavors. I think they had to refine
>their manufacturing process to get the 1GHz cBO version.

But the cC0 is the new stepping.
Intel just change their chip output from cB0 to cC0.

Anyone have a better info?
....I just want to make sure that I don't buy intel overclocking chip.

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Crashman

Polypheme
Editor
What I'm trying to get at here is that I believe Intel was FORCED to introduce the cCO setting BECAUSE they could not produce the cBO 1GHz in quantity, but there were a few that would "almost" pass the test, so they just bumped them up to 1.70v and called it a new stepping!

Suicide is painless...........
 
G

Guest

Guest
>What I'm trying to get at here is that I believe Intel was FORCED to introduce the
>cCO setting BECAUSE they could not produce the cBO 1GHz in quantity, but there
>were a few that would "almost" pass the test, so they just bumped them up to
>1.70v and called it a new stepping!

I always thought that new stepping is always the faster, coller, better one.
I never thought that intel could not make enough cB0 thus they make cC0. Weird...
But thanks for the info anyway.

I won't get the intel 1GHz then...

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Crashman

Polypheme
Editor
BTW, Intel verrified the socket 370 1GHz for SMP but not the Slot 1. My guesse would be that it has something to do with the extended data path (maybe RFI or something).

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G

Guest

Guest
I built an 800E based BX O/C system and it made it to 1120 (140MHz FSB). So, I bought another 800E processor and did it again, but I couldn't get past 992 (124MHz FSB). JCLW asked what stepping were they. After running Sisoft Sandra to lookup the stepping, I found that both are cCO. The systems are very similar (P3B-F, same memory), with different Geforce cards (irrelevant) and different sound cards (also irrelevant).

Actually, I think that the second one would at least make it to 1066 (133FSB) if I had the cheese to ramp the voltage up a little more, but it's all ready over 1.9V. The ORB keeps it below ~52C, but I decided to be not greedy. 100% stable for now, so I'll settle. I use it for Mass Spectroscopy based protein identification searches at work, and I can't afford any instability. These searches pole protein databases stored on the HD against 500 to 2000 fragmentation scans in the experimental data. It is hardcore CPU/memory/HD work. I wouldn't trust this to a system that I couldn't count on.
 

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