Intel Confirms That HDCP Master Key is Cracked

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Trialsking

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[citation][nom]will_chellam[/nom]It's like an uncrackable safe - all safes can be opened - if they couldn't, they'd be a tomb.[/citation]


Even tombs can be had....Lara Croft, Tomb Raider!
 

duzcizgi

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They are trying to play it down but you can use an FPGA & a DSP (these are both generic chips that can be field programmable)

Total cost of dev kit cost will be around $100 plus ~$30 for the FPGC+DSP chip, suct as Analog Devices Blackfin. Anyone who has enough math+programming knowledge to use this key can easily program these chips too.
 

cookoy

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kind of anti-climatic at the end - you have to make your own silicon chip.
maybe this is true for dedicated HW devices but not for PCs.
 

lukeeu

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Nobody thought that HDCP would be uncrackable. It was designed to inconvenience typical users enough to keep them from copying media, motivated ones used the analog loops or bought some other hardware setup. I hate this "I sell you stuff in a box so you can play it on an certified box the way I want" business model. Also you should know that there are many countries where it is legal to copy movies for personal use, but making/selling/using hardware that circumvents protection like HDCP gets you jail time... so the system works the way it was intended $$ :) BTW Where does DHCP certification money goes to?
 

lukeeu

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[citation][nom]alanman[/nom]People have been bypassing HDCP altogether for years now, what difference does this make?[/citation]
Better HDTV rips? That's why Intel isn't freaking out about it. Nothing changes.
 
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As usual the spin doctors are on the job. HDCP was not cracked. To use the word "cracked" is to make it seem as if the evil hackers have once again done their devious work and the world is under attack. HDCP was leaked by someone. They didn't reverse engineer it. Someone with access pasted to a website. Lets have at least some honesty. There isn't much left in journalism anymore.
 

theoutbound

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"For someone to use this information to unlock anything, they would have to implement it in silicon -- make a computer chip," he added. "As a practical matter, that's a difficult and costly thing to do."
Yeah. Or wait until someone starts selling mod-chips and instructions on how to install them.
 

bv90andy

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I bet someone has put his hive of PS3s, or something like that, to work a long time ago and it just finished decrypting.

Oh and if it's leaked, maybe the leaker was on crack when he pasted the key on-line so we can still say "It was cracked" :)
 
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Why on earth would it need to be implemented in silicon? You can translate just about anything from architecture to architecture, there was Pear-PC for running OSX on an x86 PC back when Macs used PowerPC chips, I believe that guy doesn't have a clue what he's talking about.
 

thegreathuntingdolphin

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HDCP is one of the worst implementations of drm ever. I never was even sure what the point of HDCP was except to intentionally piss customers off and increase their revenue.

For a little while I HAD to get cracking software to strip my legally owned Blurays of DRM because I had a HDMI cable that was not "HDCP Compliant". Naturally, there was nothing wrong with the cable - it plays BDs flawlessly.

Now that I got a new HDMI cable, I still get my HTPC is not "HDCP Compliant" every now and then even though ever item, wire, and device I have is HDCP compliant. It is very aggravating!
 

wavetrex

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an inconvenience to all those other than the most dedicated
Well it only takes one of those "most dedicated" and enough upload speed that the result is being spread all over the net.

I have no idea why they even bother creating these content encryption schemes, they have been and they will always be cracked. Just a waste of engineer's time.

If it has been made by man, they will be cracked by man, 100% guaranteed.
 

Kelavarus

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[citation][nom]wavetrex[/nom]I have no idea why they even bother creating these content encryption schemes, they have been and they will always be cracked. Just a waste of engineer's time.If it has been made by man, they will be cracked by man, 100% guaranteed.[/citation]

Because average Joe isn't going to have the money/patience/time to deal with cracks and more hardware and such, and thus the company makes their money.

What so many people seem to forget is that this is a tech enthusiast site. You're probably here because you already know a lot about this stuff. Congratulations, we're in the minority. My friend's mother calls him to plug the monitor into her computer, because she absolutely wants to be sure it's done right. You think she's going to really mess around with cracks and such (especially ones that aren't even advertised on TV)?

No. And thus the companies make their money, thus it's not a waste of time.
 
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yay! so now it's easier to record from tv/cable box which are all proprietary except for cable card... oh wait does anyone have cablecards? Can't wait for a cheap $50 box from china!
 
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Yes now someone can make a Blu Ray player with DVI output that works with the 60 inch Sony I have downstairs.
 
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