Question Intel Core 2 Duo E8400 3ghz

Mar 31, 2019
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So, I got a Intel Core 2 Duo E8400 3ghz, I changed the thermal paste and these are the temperature while idling
CPU: 39°C
Core 1: 46°C
Core 2: 45°C

Are they too high? I honestly didn't check the temperatures before changing the paste.
 

clutchc

Titan
Herald
Seems like I remember my dual core C2D CPUs idling in the mid 30Cs. What are you using to read temps? Try RealTemp. Then run the cores at 100% usage with Intel Burn Test at the default settings. See what the load temps are.

Are you sure you got the cooler's push-pins in securely? If you can see the back of the board, check that the white fingers are spread properly and the black pin is all the way thru the white part.
 
Mar 31, 2019
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Seems like I remember my dual core C2D CPUs idling in the mid 30Cs. What are you using to read temps? Try RealTemp. Then run the cores at 100% usage with Intel Burn Test at the default settings. See what the load temps are.

Are you sure you got the cooler's push-pins in securely? If you can see the back of the board, check that the white fingers are spread properly and the black pin is all the way thru the white part.
I read the temperatures with AIDA64 and when I unmounted the cooler, I noticed one of the white pins was cracked, I was somewhat afraid to remove it but I did and it broke a part of it, changed the thermal paste and when I put it back it stood nicely and only moved a little bit, but for the most part it was staying still.
 
Mar 31, 2019
5
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10
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Seems like I remember my dual core C2D CPUs idling in the mid 30Cs. What are you using to read temps? Try RealTemp. Then run the cores at 100% usage with Intel Burn Test at the default settings. See what the load temps are.

Are you sure you got the cooler's push-pins in securely? If you can see the back of the board, check that the white fingers are spread properly and the black pin is all the way thru the white part.
Came home from school and decided to test it with RealTemp and Intel Burn Test, the 1st CPU Core went even to 99°C and the 2nd CPU Core went up to 92°C !!!!

I really do think that it's because of that white broken pin which causes the cooler to move a bit.
 
Mar 31, 2019
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@ragnar-gd @clutchc
Manged to fix quite everything, but there is one problem, I bought a new CPU Cooler and it had a 3-pin port.

My old CPU cooler had a 4 pin one, my 3-pin slot was used by the chassis fan and I just replaced the wire from the chassis fan with the one from the cooler, everything went smooth but there is one MAJOR problem, it detects my CPU Cooler as a chassis fan, and it stays at 100% fan speed all the time, does there exist any kind of adapter from 3 pin to 4 pin? So my CPU Cooler doesn't stay at full speed all the time?

Thank you in advance!
 

ragnar-gd

Reputable
Sep 30, 2014
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I'm not entirely sure if i really understand you situation... bear with me, i might just assume something different from what you have...
The 4-pin connection is necessary for the technique the MoBo controls and detects the speed of your fan. So it is (nowadays) recommended to use a 4-pin fan for your CPU, on the 4-pin conenctor from the MoBo.
For the Chassis, using a 4-pin-fan on a 3-pin-connector, the MoBo won't be able to handle this, so you need some other means of controlling the speed. Or get a 3-pin fan.
 

clutchc

Titan
Herald
Came home from school and decided to test it with RealTemp and Intel Burn Test, the 1st CPU Core went even to 99°C and the 2nd CPU Core went up to 92°C !!!!

I really do think that it's because of that white broken pin which causes the cooler to move a bit.
If one post is not held securely, YES. That would be keep the heat sink from mating tightly to the CPU's heat spreader. Heat transfer will suffer.
Is your PC a pre-built or custom made? Some pre-builts take a proprietary cooler.

You apparently bought the wrong replacement cooler. The original cooler was a PWM fan. Your replacement is a DC controlled fan. They don't talk the same electrical language.
Plug the 3pin cooler into the 4-pin CPU FAN header to start with. Those headers accept both. Then it will be up to the BIOS to determine if it can only control PWM style fans or if it can also control regular DC fans.
 
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InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
Idle temperatures don't matter much unless they are absolutely horrible and indicate a heatsink mounting failure, somewhat high-ish temperatures at idle could just as easily be due to the fan speed curve. In my case, my CPU idles at ~45C using a 212+ because I am running fan-less, goes up to about 70C under full-load in summer.

If you stress-test the CPU and the core temperatures shoot up past 80C, then you definitely have something to worry about.
 
Mar 31, 2019
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If one post is not held securely, YES. That would be keep the heat sink from mating tightly to the CPU's heat spreader. Heat transfer will suffer.
Is your PC a pre-built or custom made? Some pre-builts take a proprietary cooler.

You apparently bought the wrong replacement cooler. The original cooler was a PWM fan. Your replacement is a DC controlled fan. They don't talk the same electrical language.
Plug the 3pin cooler into the 4-pin CPU FAN header to start with. Those headers accept both. Then it will be up to the BIOS to determine if it can only control PWM style fans or if it can also control regular DC fans.
Tried it and the cpu cooler works on the 4 pin port, thank you!
 

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