[SOLVED] Intel Core i5 7640x Windows 11 compatible?

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I currently own a core i3 9100f, but for my own reasons, I wanted to get a core i5 7640x.

Now, it's not stated in the official list of Windows 11 supported processors, but was supposedly added back in August.

I currently am running Windows 11 Pro, but was wondering if getting the LGA 2066 motherboard and a core i5 7640x would cause any problems for me, or if I could simply just change components and be on with my day.

Could someone please inform me on what I might have to do? I am hoping that I can just change motherboards and processors, then re-activate my Windows key, and keep using Windows 11. I don't want to buy a new Windows 10 key if it doesn't work, and or install Windows 11 without it being compatible.
 

Rogue Leader

It's a trap!
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That is not technically correct

System builder/OEM license/Volume/Volume open is indeed tied to hardware it was activated
Full Retail Licence of any variant (2x more expensive) is transferrable to new hardware.

https://www.windowscentral.com/how-determine-if-license-oem-retail-volume-windows-10


lincesing aside, with system level changes introduced with win10, it is no longer necessary to do fresh install when migrating to new hardware.
You are correct about the license, you are not correct about hardware, at all. We have thousands of posts here of people who tried just that. I'd say less than 20% show folks doing it and it working 100% correctly. Theres always something. Unless you swap to identical hardware (ie your motherboard dies and you install a new identical model), you need to reinstall Windows.
 
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the 7640X was merely an i5-7600K 'repackaged/resocketed' for X299, and was/ is a complete disaster performance-wise, remaining just as core/thread challenged as the i3-9100....

For goodness sake, if going X299, find at least a compatible 6c/12t or above CPU...(7800X, 7900X)
 

Bazzy 505

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Completely disregarding the licensing issues, you'd need to do a full OS reinstall anyway.
For either 10 or 11.

You can't just "change components and be on with my day ".
A Windows install is not modular like that.
That is not technically correct

System builder/OEM license/Volume/Volume open is indeed tied to hardware it was activated
Full Retail Licence of any variant (2x more expensive) is transferrable to new hardware.

https://www.windowscentral.com/how-determine-if-license-oem-retail-volume-windows-10


lincesing aside, with system level changes introduced with win10, it is no longer necessary to do fresh install when migrating to new hardware.
 
Reactions: RoryHankel
That is not technically correct

System builder/OEM license/Volume/Volume open is indeed tied to hardware it was activated
Full Retail Licence of any variant (2x more expensive) is transferrable to new hardware.

https://www.windowscentral.com/how-determine-if-license-oem-retail-volume-windows-10


lincesing aside, with system level changes introduced with win10, it is no longer necessary to do fresh install when migrating to new hardware.
Theoretically yes but in practice no, tested by me. Change from 6700K to 6950X and had performance issues with the cpu, was obtaining 20% lower scores. I could not fix that so i had to do a fresh install. Also among all my pc which i had to do maintenance and upgrade none performed correctly, had to do a fresh install after a major upgrade (CPU, MOBO).
 
Reactions: RoryHankel

Rogue Leader

It's a trap!
Moderator
That is not technically correct

System builder/OEM license/Volume/Volume open is indeed tied to hardware it was activated
Full Retail Licence of any variant (2x more expensive) is transferrable to new hardware.

https://www.windowscentral.com/how-determine-if-license-oem-retail-volume-windows-10


lincesing aside, with system level changes introduced with win10, it is no longer necessary to do fresh install when migrating to new hardware.
You are correct about the license, you are not correct about hardware, at all. We have thousands of posts here of people who tried just that. I'd say less than 20% show folks doing it and it working 100% correctly. Theres always something. Unless you swap to identical hardware (ie your motherboard dies and you install a new identical model), you need to reinstall Windows.
 
Reactions: RoryHankel

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
That is not technically correct

System builder/OEM license/Volume/Volume open is indeed tied to hardware it was activated
Full Retail Licence of any variant (2x more expensive) is transferrable to new hardware.

https://www.windowscentral.com/how-determine-if-license-oem-retail-volume-windows-10

lincesing aside, with system level changes introduced with win10, it is no longer necessary to do fresh install when migrating to new hardware.
Windows 10 simply makes it more likely that cutting corners works out, it didn't make it unnecessary, or make a full, fresh reinstall no longer the best practice. After replacing junk PSUs, improper OS installation on hardware upgrades is probably our most resolved problem.
 
Reactions: RoryHankel

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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lincesing aside, with system level changes introduced with win10, it is no longer necessary to do fresh install when migrating to new hardware.
Oh, were it only that simple.

Win 10 is absolutely better than previous versions. But by no means 100%.

3 possibilities:
  1. It works just fine
  2. It fails completely.
  3. It "works", but you're chasing issues for weeks/months.
I've personally had all 3.
And #3 is showing to be the most common.


And there is no more 'System builder' license with Win 10.
 
That is not technically correct

System builder/OEM license/Volume/Volume open is indeed tied to hardware it was activated
Full Retail Licence of any variant (2x more expensive) is transferrable to new hardware.

https://www.windowscentral.com/how-determine-if-license-oem-retail-volume-windows-10


lincesing aside, with system level changes introduced with win10, it is no longer necessary to do fresh install when migrating to new hardware.
The above posters nail it. Just because you can do it doesn't mean that you should. Of the 3 scenarios @USAFRet states, I too have seen #3 the most whenever people have done this.

Microsoft always offered the option to 'upgrade' your Windows version via in in place upgrade, with the alternative being a totally clean install. Those who have been around for decades will know exactly which one of those two is the best option. This is similar, you can do it, but there's a better option that has far less chance of something going amiss.
 

Bazzy 505

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Jul 17, 2021
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Oh, were it only that simple.

Win 10 is absolutely better than previous versions. But by no means 100%.

3 possibilities:
  1. It works just fine
  2. It fails completely.
  3. It "works", but you're chasing issues for weeks/months.
I've personally had all 3.
And #3 is showing to be the most common.


And there is no more 'System builder' license with Win 10.
it's certainly not 100%, quality of the "donor" install is a great factor in the success rate.
I would certainly not recommend doing this with OEM installations or windows7/8 to 10 upgrade installations for too many reasons to list here.
there's also the the less than stellar support of core 6 and older which is not entirely ms fault but it is what it is.

But technically with a healthy installation of win10 on which major hardware change is detected, clean install of everything below ring 3 is performed on first boot anyways. The catch there is to cleanup windows driver cache before migration.
 
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USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
147,515
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175,390
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it's certainly not 100%, quality of the "donor" install is a great factor in the success rate.
I would certainly not recommend doing this with OEM installations or windows7/8 to 10 upgrade installations for too many reasons to list here.
there's also the the less than stellar support of core 6 and older which is not entirely ms fault but it is what it is.

But technically with a healthy installation of win10 on which major hardware change is detected, clean install of everything below ring 3 is performed on first boot anyways. The catch there is to cleanup windows driver cache before migration.
From your comment:
"it is no longer necessary to do fresh install when migrating to new hardware. "

...that points to "Just do it, it always works" With no caveats or conditions.

The licensing (OEM vs Retail) has nothing to do with the actual install.

Moving a drive+OS to different hardware is iffy at best.
Telling people that Win 10 has no problem with this results in people doing it, and having problems. People come here with this specific problem just about every day.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
it's certainly not 100%, quality of the "donor" install is a great factor in the success rate.
I would certainly not recommend doing this with OEM installations or windows7/8 to 10 upgrade installations for too many reasons to list here.
there's also the the less than stellar support of core 6 and older which is not entirely ms fault but it is what it is.

But technically with a healthy installation of win10 on which major hardware change is detected, clean install of everything below ring 3 is performed on first boot anyways. The catch there is to cleanup windows driver cache before migration.
But what's the benefit? If you end up with an odd problem that isn't obvious to fix, then you're going to end up reinstalling anyway. You can eliminate most of the hassle of an install by having your files properly backed up -- which you should be doing anyway -- and keeping an organized list/archive of software you use.

It's best just to do it right the first time and eliminate a source of future problems. Why roll the dice to avoid something really easy to do?
 
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Apr 25, 2021
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Next time, don't come on my thread, start arguments with me, not answer my question, then accuse me of being childish. The person who said that is now blocked and cannot have the privilege of talking to me. If you don't have anything better to say, then leave and be on with your day. I have already marked the correct answer, but next time, be respectful.
 
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