News Intel Deep Dives on Nervana NNP-T: 27 Billion Transistors, 32GB of HBM2 Packed on 688mm-Squared Die

May 31, 2019
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Nvidia already lost out on the end-all-be-all solution argument last year with the arrival of the crypto asic chips.

We'll see if the ai asics similarly dominate ...

The bfloat16 support will be a low power advantage for the NNP-T.

The Microsoft Brainwave project indicates FPGAs are a win in some applications also.
 

bit_user

Splendid
Herald
I had to smile at the PCIe 4.0 interface, since Intel won't have a CPU/platform capable of that until Q2 of 2020. So, in the meantime, I wonder how many of these will find their way into EPYC-based servers.

The raw performance numbers don't strike me as anything that immediately threatens Nvidia, but they could have an edge in perf / W, multi-chassis scalability, and certain use cases.

What I expect to be their biggest challenge is that it's probably going to launch against the V100's successor, which should be on a 7 nm (possibly EUV) node.
 

bit_user

Splendid
Herald
Why Intel could not put HBM on normal CPUs? With 32GB HBM integrated, then don' t even need to buy memory kits.
I've been waiting for this and fully expected it to happen, by now. At least for ultra-mobile laptops or cell phones. Something with decent margins and integrated graphics, where the power savings would be at least on par with the performance gains.

Their final Xeon Phi (KNL) generation had 16 GB of MCDRAM, in package. And that launched at least 3 years ago, so...

Anyway, with Lakefield, they have finally got the DRAM in-package. Only 4-8 GB, though.
 
Jun 17, 2019
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Their final Xeon Phi (KNL) generation had 16 GB of MCDRAM, in package. And that launched at least 3 years ago, so...
That MCDRAM is HMC type memory with high memory bandwidth but with memory latency similar to normal DDR3 or DDR4 memory. Wished Intel continued using these in their normal CPUs when their Intel Xeon Phi series got retired. Pretty sure there would be leftovers.

Anyway, with Lakefield, they have finally got the DRAM in-package. Only 4-8 GB, though.
This Intel Lakefield SoC would be very much at home in UMPCs, tablets, laptops (including Chromebooks), touch screen kiosks, compute sticks, SBCs (single board computers), ultra small mini PCs and drones. Kinda wondering if Intel is ever going to re-enter the mobile smartphone market again with this upcoming SoC.
 
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bit_user

Splendid
Herald
That MCDRAM is HMC type memory with high memory bandwidth but with memory latency similar to normal DDR3 or DDR4 memory. Wished Intel continued using these in their normal CPUs when their Intel Xeon Phi series got retired. Pretty sure there would be leftovers.
Sadly, bandwidth did not compare well vs. HBM, much less HBM2. But, if they'd stayed in it, maybe HMC2 would be better.

This Intel Lakefield SoC would be very much at home in UMPCs, tablets, laptops (including Chromebooks), touch screen kiosks, compute sticks, SBCs (single board computers), ultra small mini PCs and drones. Kinda wondering if Intel is ever going to re-enter the mobile smartphone market again with this upcoming SoC.
It has a 64 EU ("Iris Pro") GPU, however. So, that's a hint at which market(s) it's targeting. It will be a higher-margin part, where power-efficiency and form factor are at a premium. With only one "big" core, it's probably not going to target higher-end airtops, but with that 64 EU iGPU, it's not exactly destined for Chromebooks. And it makes no sense for NUCs, which don't need that level of integration or power-efficiency and wouldn't want to take the hit on big-core-count.

Of course, it could set the stage for things to come. And that where things could get really interesting.
 

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