Intel Demos Single Chip with 48 Cores

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opmopadop

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I would be more interested in what Intel defines 'Cloud Computing' as. Microsoft's explination is like watching a politician on the news... Lots of words, not much said.
 

Dkz

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I had a teacher last year who had these... "for fun" predictions about the future of hardware specially CPUs, he said that in few years (this happened 1 year ago) there will have invented a CPU that works as a computer network, with cores as work stations with their own IP address, I actually can't believe that he was almost right.... Being an Old man it's gonna be really fun guys! can you imagine.. all that free time with computers with this capabilities XD!
 
Before all of you get all excited, those cores are probably much simpler than those currently on the i7s, or even the AMD Phenom IIs. That said this is still pretty interesting, but we'll have to wait and see if anything comes from it, or if it ends up as revolutionary as the Itanium :p.
 

jawshoeaw

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A.I. will never happen on x86 - it takes too much power. I read an estimate for simulating human brain on silicon would take output of an entire nuclear plant, i.e. hundreds of megawatts. Unless you ditch the whole ones and zeros modality and build your silicon more like a brain that is. Maybe the 48 cores is a bridge to this type of hybrid computing
 
[citation][nom]winner4455[/nom]First we need to utilize 4 cores.[/citation]
Exactly! There's VERY FEW programs optimized for 4 cores, let alone 48 cores. Programming REALLY needs to catch up to hardware now (esp. considering i9 will be out soon).
 

ta152h

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Anything that kills x86 has to be good. I don't care if it has four cores, or 48 cores, as long as it doesn't suffer from x86, it's a step in the right direction.

But, this is obviously going to be a niche product. They really need to find a way to get rid of the x86 instruction set that plagues the computer industry. It's like God's little joke - arguably the worst instruction set created has become the most popular. Part of the move to go green should be to get rid of x86. Think of the lost performance, and extra wattage used because of it, then multiply it by the 100 of millions of computers that are being used. It might be a little per computer, but when you add it all up, it's still a huge amount.

I guess he's not entirely cruel - Unix never got popular.
 
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