Question Intel i7 11700 temp test

miller84

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Oct 22, 2013
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Hello people
I've build a new PC for gaming and after the build is done I've ran some temp. tests to check if the cooler is doing it's job and to see what is the CPU temp. on max load so I tested with Prime 95 (small FFTs)
and measured the temp. with Core Temp tool and this is the results: (Screenshot)
The average temp. is 190.4 F on 100% load. I couldn't find and data regarding this particular CPU and working temps. so I'm curious if the results I'm getting are OK.

Hardware info:
CPU: Intel i7 11700
CPU cooler: Corsair iCUE H100i RGB PRO XT (Stock thermal paste)
MB: Asus ROG Strix B560-G Gaming WiFi
RAM: 32GB (2x16) HyperX DDR4 3200 (XMP 3200 is enabled in BIOS)
GPU: Asus ROG Strix RTX 3070Ti
Case with 5 120mm fans (3 on the front, one on the back and another one under the GPU)

Thanks in advance.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Something isn't right there, your core temps are much too high, in fact, you are at throttle temperature for that CPU.

Either there is an issue with your cooler, an issue with it's installation or a problem with the frequency or voltage configuration of the CPU.




I have outlined my preferred overclocking validation and thermal compliance testing procedures in the guide at the second link. You SHOULD read the entire article "The Intel temperature guide" before doing anything else so that, even if you don't fully understand all of it (Mostly, Computronix has written this in a way that even the least experienced layman can understand) you will at least take away a good basic understanding of the Intel architectural expectations.
 
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geofelt

Titan
What is your idle temperature?
FWIW, forum users are more used to centigrade for measuring.
It should be in the range of 10-15c. over ambient if your cooler is mounted well and is functioning.

What is the make/model of your case ?
What fans are mounted as intake/exhaust?
Where is the radiator mounted?
Does it take in outside air?
 

miller84

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Oct 22, 2013
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Something isn't right there, your core temps are much too high, in fact, you are at throttle temperature for that CPU.

Either there is an issue with your cooler, an issue with it's installation or a problem with the frequency or voltage configuration of the CPU.




I have outlined my preferred overclocking validation and thermal compliance testing procedures in the guide at the second link. You SHOULD read the entire article "The Intel temperature guide" before doing anything else so that, even if you don't fully understand all of it (Mostly, Computronix has written this in a way that even the least experienced layman can understand) you will at least take away a good basic understanding of the Intel architectural expectations.
Thank you! Will do so.
 

miller84

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Oct 22, 2013
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What is your idle temperature?
FWIW, forum users are more used to centigrade for measuring.
It should be in the range of 10-15c. over ambient if your cooler is mounted well and is functioning.

What is the make/model of your case ?
What fans are mounted as intake/exhaust?
Where is the radiator mounted?
Does it take in outside air?
Idle temp is around 91.5F.
I
What is your idle temperature?
FWIW, forum users are more used to centigrade for measuring.
It should be in the range of 10-15c. over ambient if your cooler is mounted well and is functioning.

What is the make/model of your case ?
What fans are mounted as intake/exhaust?
Where is the radiator mounted?
Does it take in outside air?
The idle temp. is around 91.5F...
Please see this photo for details.
My case is Antec DF700 Flux
 

geofelt

Titan
You are ok.

FYI, 94f. is 30c.
194f is 90c
We work in c.

Intel processors throttle at 100c.

Good looking case.
I would assume the front fans are intakes as is the bottom.
The rear is exhaust and the radiator on top is set to take in air from inside the case and expel it out the top.
 

miller84

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Oct 22, 2013
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You are ok.

FYI, 94f. is 30c.
194f is 90c
We work in c.

Intel processors throttle at 100c.

Good looking case.
I would assume the front fans are intakes as is the bottom.
The rear is exhaust and the radiator on top is set to take in air from inside the case and expel it out the top.
Thanks for the feedback.
The idle temp. is 35c. and on full load (100%) the temp. is 88-89c.
You are correct about the fans.
 

geofelt

Titan
Phaaze88 raises a good question.
Dangle a tissue near each fan to verify the direction of airflow for each fan.
I can not see the hubs too clearly, but the front fans look like exhausts.
Whatever, all fans must move air in one direction.

Mounting a radiator is catch22. If you mount to take in fresh air, your cpu is cooled best. But the heated air will then not do well with the motherboard and graphics card.

If you mount the radiator to use warmer case air, your cpu will not be cooled as well, but more fresh air will cool the graphics card and motherboard.

On balance, I think the latter is better. A non overclocked i7-11700 should not run too hot.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
You are ok.

FYI, 94f. is 30c.
194f is 90c
We work in c.

Intel processors throttle at 100c.

Good looking case.
I would assume the front fans are intakes as is the bottom.
The rear is exhaust and the radiator on top is set to take in air from inside the case and expel it out the top.
NO, not ok. The screenshot from Core Temp shows 100°C, not F. There is absolutely a problem.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Something strange going on.
The same screen shot shows a minimum of 0c.

You're right, that is not normal. Might be a bad board, IDK. Too soon to say.

@miller84, try using the latest version of HWinfo instead of Core Temp.

Monitoring software

HWmonitor, Open hardware monitor, Realtemp, Speccy, Speedfan, Windows utilities, CPU-Z, NZXT CAM and most of the bundled motherboard utilities are often not the best choice as they are not always accurate. Some are actually grossly inaccurate, especially with certain chipsets or specific sensors that for whatever reason they tend to not like or work well with. I've found HWinfo or CoreTemp to be the MOST accurate with the broadest range of chipsets and sensors. They are also almost religiously kept up to date.

CoreTemp is great for just CPU thermals including core temps or distance to TJmax on older AMD platforms.

HWinfo is great for pretty much EVERYTHING, including CPU thermals, core loads, core temps, package temps, GPU sensors, HDD and SSD sensors, motherboard chipset and VRM sensor, all of it. When starting HWinfo after installation, always check the box next to "sensors only" and de-select the box next to "summary".


Run HWinfo and look at system voltages and other sensor readings.

Monitoring temperatures, core speeds, voltages, clock ratios and other reported sensor data can often help to pick out an issue right off the bat. HWinfo is a good way to get that data and in my experience tends to be more accurate than some of the other utilities available. CPU-Z, GPU-Z and Core Temp all have their uses but HWinfo tends to have it all laid out in a more convenient fashion so you can usually see what one sensor is reporting while looking at another instead of having to flip through various tabs that have specific groupings, plus, it is extremely rare for HWinfo to not report the correct sensor values under the correct sensor listings, or misreport other information. Utilities like HWmonitor, Openhardware monitor and Speccy, tend to COMMONLY misreport sensor data, or not report it at all.

After installation, run the utility and when asked, choose "sensors only". IF you get a message about system stability you can simply ignore it and continue on WITH the option to monitor the sensor OR you can disable the monitoring for THAT sensor and continue on based on the option it gives you at the time. If you choose to continue on, WITH monitoring of that sensor, which is what I normally do, and there IS instability, that's fine. It's not going to hurt anything. Simply restart the HWinfo program (Or reboot if necessary and THEN restart the HWinfo program) and THEN choose to disable that sensor, and continue on with sensors only monitoring.

The other window options have some use but in most cases everything you need will be located in the sensors window. If you're taking screenshots to post for troubleshooting, it will most likely require taking three screenshots and scrolling down the sensors window between screenshots in order to capture them all.

It is most helpful if you can take a series of HWinfo screenshots at idle, after a cold boot to the desktop. Open HWinfo and wait for all of the Windows startup processes to complete. Usually about four or five minutes should be plenty. Take screenshots of all the HWinfo sensors.

Next, run something demanding like Prime95 (With AVX and AVX2 disabled) or Heaven benchmark. Take another set of screenshots while either of those is running so we can see what the hardware is doing while under a load.


*Download HWinfo







Also, posting screenshots, when requested, is helpful so WE can see what is going on as well and you can learn how to do that here:



How to post images on Tom's hardware forums

 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
This is a known bug observed with several RKL CPUs. I have already submitted this to Intel, but don't know if there's any progress nor haven't seen this listed as an official erratum yet.
The author of HWinfo would seem to agree.

https://www.overclock.net/threads/a-possible-defect-in-11th-gen-cpus-i-just-got-done-speaking-to-intel.1792599/post-28843238


So, it doesn't change the fact that the CPU is reaching throttle temperature. This is still a problem and previous suggestions addressed at this are still valid. I'd simply ignore the zero degree min temps and pay attention only to peak temps, which is ALWAYS my recommendation anyhow, since minimum temps are basically irrelevant.
 

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