Question Intel I7 4770K Overclock Limit

Robox

Honorable
Jun 7, 2014
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I'm trying to overclock an I7 4770K mounted on an MSI Z87-G41 motherboard with 2X4GB DDR3 1886. (Latest Bios, Water Cooling)

To find the maximum CPU frequency I set the RAM to 1600 with 1.5v, and I set the ring ratio to 30 (3.000 Mhz) with VCCIN 1.9v, I also disabled LLC EIST and C-state.

By doing stability tests with LinX, the CPU Ratio at 45 does not hold up (crash) even with 1.4v of vcore. The voltages are set in override mode.

At the moment, I'm finding stability only with a CPU ratio of 42 (and I'm trying to find a lower voltage, such as 1.32v).

From what I read on these CPUs and on the results achieved (or in terms of maximum frequency, or in any case of lower frequencies but with decidedly lower voltages) I believe that in my case there is something wrong.

Can you tell me if it's a normal situation?

Also, how can I act to try to achieve stability at higher frequencies or, if I have to stop at a frequency of 4200, at least with a lower voltage?

I enclose some screenshots of the bios of how I set in this multiple (very bad) result:



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CompuTronix

Judicious
Moderator
Robox,

1.4 Vcore will very quickly degrade 22 nanometer processors, which includes the i7-4770K, as well it's successor, the i7-4790K.

Although 1.400 is the maximum recommended Vcore for 14 nanometer processors, 1.300 is the maximum recommended Vcore for 22 nanometer processors, which is just below the degradation (electromigration) curve by a safe margin.

Here's the maximum recommended Core voltage per Microarchitecture from 14 to 65 nanometers since 2006:



No two processors are identical; each is unique in voltage tolerance, thermal behavior and overclocking potential, which is often referred to as the "silicon lottery".

I should point out that the 4790K is a better overclocker than the older 4770K. I've found on the 4770K, of the 7 samples I overclocked , they ranged from 4.1 to 4.7GHz, Unfortunately, your sample appears to be in the lower range of typical.

Overclocking is always limited by two factors; voltage and temperature.

Excessive Vcore and Core temperature may result in accelerated "Electromigration" - https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=Electromigration

This prematurely erodes the traces and junctions within the processor's layers and nano-circuits, which will eventually result in blue-screen crashes that become increasingly frequent over time. As a rule, CPU's are more susceptible to Electromigration with each Die-shrink. However, the most notable exception is Intel's 14 nanometer Microarchitecture, where advances in FinFET transistor technology have improved voltage tolerance.

When tweaking your processor near its highest overclock, keep in mind that for an increase of 100 MHz, a corresponding increase of about 50 millivolts (0.050) is needed to maintain stability. If 70 millivolts (0.070) or more is needed for the next stable 100 MHz increase, it means your processor is overclocked beyond it's capability.

With high-end cooling you might reach the Vcore limit before 85°C. With low-end cooling you’ll reach 85°C before the Vcore limit. Regardless, whichever limit you reach first is where you should stop.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.



Core temperatures increase and decrease with ambient (room) temperature, where the international "standard" for "normal" room temperature is 22°C or 72°C.

Remember to keep overclocking in perspective. For example, the difference between 4.2 and 4.3Ghz is less than 2.4%, which has no noticeable impact on overall system performance. It simply isn’t worth pushing your processor beyond recommended Core voltage and Core temperature limits just to squeeze out another 100 MHz.

CPU Overclocking Guide and Tutorial for Beginners - http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-3761568/beginners-guide-overclocking-cpu-explicit-testing-guidelines.html

Intel Temperature Guide - https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/intel-temperature-guide.1488337/


CT :sol:
 

Robox

Honorable
Jun 7, 2014
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I found the established at 4200 with a vcore of 1.2v (20 cycle of linx with good temperature).

If I increase the frequency, the necessary vcore increases excessively, minimum 1.4

Is this situation normal?


Furthermore, if I delid the cpu and do the tests with 10-15 degrees less than the 100 (actual at 4500 under linx), could it change something in the stability at 4500@1.4v?
 

CompuTronix

Judicious
Moderator
Yes. As Core speed (MHz) is increased, Core voltage (Vcore) must also be increased to maintain stability. This also increases Power consumption (Watts) which increases Core temperatures.

Conversely, when a processor is delidded, the resulting decrease in Core temperatures increases and enhances stability.

Here's an interesting Tom's video interview where Intel Discusses i7-4790K Core Temperatures and Overclocking. The principles and details mentioned in this video also apply to all processors, including your 4770K.

As per Intel in this video, and as illustrated in the Core temperature scale of my previous post, less than 80°C is your ideal target. Further, I can not overemphasize that for 22 nanometer processors, exceeding 1.300 Vcore is NOT recommended.

It simply isn’t worth pushing your processor beyond recommended Core voltage and Core temperature limits just to squeeze out another 100 MHz.

CT :sol:
 

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