Question Intel i9 high temperatures, due to high voltage(?) need some help/guiding to setup my cpu clock speed and voltage

Mar 9, 2019
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Hi guys.

So I recently bought a new pc setup with the following specs:
OS: windows 10 x64
Mobo: msi z370 krait gaming (latest bios)
Cpu: intel i9 9900k
Gfx: msi rtx 2070 8gb armored
Ram: 2x8gb g.skill 3000mhz
Storage: 2x samsung SSD (1x 120 for windos boot) + 2 hhd 500 gb from western digital

Cooling:
2 x corsair rgb fans (120mm)
Cpu cooling: corsair H80i v.2 water cooler.

Now, I tried to setup my ny cpu with some overclocking guides, but never manage to get a stable performance, and got some blue screens and freezes. So I just set cpu clock speed, voltage, etc. to “auto” in the bios. This way my pc runs smooth with no crashes or blue screens.

BUT, when I look at HWmonitor, my cpu clock speed is pretty much alwas 4,8-5,0Ghz with idle temperatures on 30-40C. When i start up my games, temperatures rises dramaticly and peaks around 89-90C. I’m pretty worried about such high temperatures.
Some cores used 1,4 volt which I think makes my temperstures rise to such high degrees.

So im looking for some help to setup a lower clock speed with lower voltage. But im really new to this and dont know how to lower the clock speed and match voltage.

I really dont need a core clock speed of 5,0Ghz.

If anyone could point me in the right direction of how to lower the clock speed and match my voltage i would really appriciate it!

Best regards!
 

mdd1963

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5.0 GHz is that CPU's natural turbo speed....

(Is it going to 5 GHz on all cores? That would be indicative of MCE being enabled, or whatever MSI calls MCE, and you can disable that in the BIOS, so that only 1-2 cores go to 5 GHz....) HWMonitor will show you what clock speeds are being hit by all cores simultaneously...

If you'd like lower speeds, you can certainly specify lower clock speeds, limiting it's turbo if you so choose...I doubt if 4.7 GHz on all cores would seem 'slow' just yet....
 
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MeanMachine41

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May 8, 2014
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The Intel i9 9900k does run hot and really requires a h110i dual rad to achieve 5GHz OC.
You can fix your Core ratio to 4.6GHz and disabling Turbo boost will allow your H80 to cope better. By lowering your CPU Core voltage to say 1.2V less heat will be generated. If the system refuses to boot at these settings then raise CPU Core voltage in .02V steps till system boots and is stable. Do not exceed 1.4V on the Core for Safety and longevity.
Go into your Bios>OC> Intel Turbo Boost (default is enabled) Disable this function.
Now go to Bios>OC> CPU Voltages control (default is AUTO) set voltage to 1.2V initially to try.
Reboot the system and check your temps and report the results.
There are other OC considerations and Bios settings if you want to later.
 
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Mar 9, 2019
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The Intel i9 9900k does run hot and really requires a h110i dual rad to achieve 5GHz OC.
You can fix your Core ratio to 4.6GHz and disabling Turbo boost will allow your H80 to cope better. By lowering your CPU Core voltage to say 1.2V less heat will be generated. If the system refuses to boot at these settings then raise CPU Core voltage in .02V steps till system boots and is stable. Do not exceed 1.4V on the Core for Safety and longevity.
Go into your Bios>OC> Intel Turbo Boost (default is enabled) Disable this function.
Now go to Bios>OC> CPU Voltages control (default is AUTO) set voltage to 1.2V initially to try.
Reboot the system and check your temps and report the results.
There are other OC considerations and Bios settings if you want to later.
So i dont have to edit any clock speed on my cores? Only disable the turbo boost and set voltage to 1.20?
I think the stock clock speed is 3,6Ghz, but i Would like to for something like 4,3-4,5Ghz if my temperatures can handle this?

Thx for the respons!
 
Mar 9, 2019
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5.0 GHz is that CPU's natural turbo speed....

(Is it going to 5 GHz on all cores? That would be indicative of MCE being enabled, or whatever MSI calls MCE, and you can disable that in the BIOS, so that only 1-2 cores go to 5 GHz....) HWMonitor will show you what clock speeds are being hit by all cores simultaneously...

If you'd like lower speeds, you can certainly specify lower clock speeds, limiting it's turbo if you so choose...I doubt if 4.7 GHz on all cores would seem 'slow' just yet....
Yep, all cores runs with this clock speed (4,8-5,0Ghz) and modt of them pulls 1,4V. I think thid id why the temps gets so high under heavyload like when I’m gaming.

I dont think any game requires this much cpu power, and likewise, i dont think i would feel any difference while gaming, if my clock speed is 5,0Ghz and (maybe lets say) 4,4-4,5Ghz.

My actual goal is to lower the temps. But my cabinet wont fit a corsair H100 due to its size. So i wanna try to cap the cpu clock speed a bit lower so i can lower the voltage need.
 

karenjoly

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Apr 13, 2018
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As stated, but you have not followed up, the bios is likely set to use automatic turbo by default so your cpu runs full cores ~ 5GHz from boot even at idle. Find that setting and turn it off and forget about voltages or other parameters. But then the board will not run the cores in mid numbers between base and turbo. It's all or none until you need turbo, and then only on some cores untill, all cores need turbo. OR you can install better cooling and leave the MCE as it is. Like I do.
 
Mar 9, 2019
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As stated, but you have not followed up, the bios is likely set to use automatic turbo by default so your cpu runs full cores @turbo ~ 5GHz from boot even at idle. Find that setting and turn it off and forget about voltages or other parameters. But then the board will not run the cores in mid numbers between base and turbo. It's all or none until you need turbo, and then only on some cores untill, all cores need turbo. OR you can install better cooling and leave the MCE as it is. Like I do.
Just came home from work.
I disabled intel turbo boost and EIST.
Set the clock speed on all cores to 4,6GHz.
Set the core voltage to 1,25

Everything else is on auto.

Tried testing with 1-2 hours of gaming. My max temperatures on all cores is now max at 78C under load.
And 40-55C at idle.

This will be fine I guess. It stable and much lower temperatures!

Thx for the help!
 

MeanMachine41

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So i dont have to edit any clock speed on my cores? Only disable the turbo boost and set voltage to 1.20?
I think the stock clock speed is 3,6Ghz, but i Would like to for something like 4,3-4,5Ghz if my temperatures can handle this?

Thx for the respons!
I noticed you found out how to fix core frequency to 4.6GHz.
There is very little headroom above 5GHz even for a dual rad to cope with,so your current settings as I suggested have at least provided some stability and lowered your temps.
You won't notice much by way of gaming performance (if you do some benchmarks) and it's better to have stability than MAX frequency and having to contend with heat issues.
Also as an avid Overclocker I can tell you that tree hugging features such as speedstep and C1e provide instability with any decent overclock.
Good Luck and glad you have it sorted.
 
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Mar 9, 2019
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I noticed you found out how to fix core frequency to 4.6GHz.
There is very little headroom above 5GHz even for a dual rad to cope with,so your current settings as I suggested have at least provided some stability and lowered your temps.
You won't notice much by way of gaming performance (if you do some benchmarks) and it's better to have stability than MAX frequency and having to contend with heat issues.
Also as an avid Overclocker I can tell you that tree hugging features such as speedstep and C1e provide instability with any decent overclock.
Good Luck and glad you have it sorted.
I have disabled EIST, but what is C1e?
 

MeanMachine41

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C states are essentially idle sleep states or when the system is at idle.
They are energy saving features and can be referenced in Wikipedia and Hardware Secrets.
Go here: https://www.hardwaresecrets.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-cpu-c-states-power-saving-modes/2/
And here this Intel article also covers "P" states: https://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/power-management-states-p-states-c-states-and-package-c-states.

From experience and when attempting MAX Overclocks they very often create an instability.
For those wishing to conserve energy (not much) then you can enable these power saving features once you know your system is stable.
 
Mar 9, 2019
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0
10
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0
C states are essentially idle sleep states or when the system is at idle.
They are energy saving features and can be referenced in Wikipedia and Hardware Secrets.
Go here: https://www.hardwaresecrets.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-cpu-c-states-power-saving-modes/2/
And here this Intel article also covers "P" states: https://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/power-management-states-p-states-c-states-and-package-c-states.

From experience and when attempting MAX Overclocks they very often create an instability.
For those wishing to conserve energy (not much) then you can enable these power saving features once you know your system is stable.
I hav disable intel C-state, and my system runs stable now. I have fixed clock speed, so i guess c-state doesnt do much anyway? Since it cant adjust clockspeed when it is set to fixed?

Or should i turn of fixed clockspeed for dynamic?
 

MeanMachine41

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May 8, 2014
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As your system is stable and temps are in check and if you are satisfied with your efforts, then leave it at that.
When and if you decide to try for a MAX Overclock with a cooling system to cope and you are confident in your Bios skills then the rest is trial and error. Also realize the msi z370 krait gaming although a decent MB is really not meant for a MAX Overclock using i9 9900k.
 
Jun 2, 2019
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Now that it's summer, my gaming laptop (Helios 500) runs ridiculously hot! 97C
This screenshot shows the CPU temp whilst playing Black Ops 4: https://ibb.co/VS8qggb

the funny thing is that the CPU isn't even under max load. In comparison, the video card is a sensible temperature.

I tried installing Intel Xtreme Tuning to try to open the configuration files and undervolt the CPU. But that failed because Intel Xtreme Tuning made my laptop shut-down after logging in.

I'm going to check the BIOS...
UPDATE: nothing in UEFI about voltages
 
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