News Intel Lists 65W B-Series Tiger Lake CPUs With Very High Clocks

cyrusfox

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Makes you really question why Rocket lake was released, and why we won't see a desktop refresh till Alder lake. Guess it is likely due ot 14nm vs 10nm capacity. These would have been much better than Rocket lake.
 

spongiemaster

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Makes you really question why Rocket lake was released, and why we won't see a desktop refresh till Alder lake. Guess it is likely due ot 14nm vs 10nm capacity. These would have been much better than Rocket lake.
Intel approved Rocket Lake development in early 2019. Before even Zen2 CPU's had been released, so Intel had no idea what they were going to be competing against from AMD. By the time Zen3 CPU's released late last year, it was too late to cancel Rocket Lake.
 

dehjomz

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It would be a nice gesture from Intel to bring these to the current LGA 1200 socket.
It would an extremely nice gesture, or they could also bring a derivative of Alder Lake to LGA1200 as well… I see no reason why Z590 lives for barely 6 months…before new cpus that don’t support it come to market.
 

InvalidError

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Makes you really question why Rocket lake was released, and why we won't see a desktop refresh till Alder lake. Guess it is likely due ot 14nm vs 10nm capacity.
Intel gave up on 10nm two years ago, moving most new investments towards 7nm instead of scaling 10nm up, so I doubt it has anywhere near enough 10nm volume to handle a full-scale transition to Alder Lake.

I suspect Rocket Lake exists mainly because Alder Lake will be nearly unobtainable and overpriced, albeit possibly not quite as bad as Broadwell.
 

spongiemaster

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I see no reason why Z590 lives for barely 6 months…before new cpus that don’t support it come to market.
Delays in getting Rocket Lake to market pushed the releases closer together. I'm still skeptical we will see desktop Alder Lake this year. Intel may announce it this year, like they did Rocket Lake late last year, but I doubt there will be "normal" availability until well into 2022.
 

zodiacfml

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10nm is truly an evolution of 14nm, or a two year gap in traditional Intel tick/tock. The i3-11100 is a small upgrade to my i3-8100, same TDP, same base clock. Multi-threading is a good upgrade though for highly threaded workloads
 
Intel gave up on 10nm two years ago, moving most new investments towards 7nm instead of scaling 10nm up, so I doubt it has anywhere near enough 10nm volume to handle a full-scale transition to Alder Lake.

I suspect Rocket Lake exists mainly because Alder Lake will be nearly unobtainable and overpriced, albeit possibly not quite as bad as Broadwell.
They didn't have a full-scale transition to Rocket Lake yet either (only i5 and above) and RL had a reduced core count for the i9 on top.

  1. They might not have enough 14nm volume right now because of how the market is.
  2. Or you could say that they switched 14nm production to 10nm and that's why
, both statements would be completely speculative.

Rocket Lake exists because intel can sell it and make money from it, plain and simple. Alder Lake might not even be marketed towards the desktop market, just like the J CPUs when they where first introduced and everybody thought that it would be the end of socketed CPUs, turned out they where a small niche CPU.
 

InvalidError

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They didn't have a full-scale transition to Rocket Lake yet either (only i5 and above) and RL had a reduced core count for the i9 on top.
Cypress Cove cores are bigger, the Xe IGP is bigger too so something had to give to keep die size manageable. Despite having two fewer cores, Rocket Lake is 270mmsq vs 206mmsq for Comet Lake. It is understandable that Intel may not be eager to bring a 30% die size increase to entry-level SKUs while it is already short on fab capacity across the board.
 

Joseph_138

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10nm is truly an evolution of 14nm, or a two year gap in traditional Intel tick/tock. The i3-11100 is a small upgrade to my i3-8100, same TDP, same base clock. Multi-threading is a good upgrade though for highly threaded workloads
The difference between 4C/4T and 4C/8T is bigger than you think it is, and is only going to get bigger going forward as games and apps need more CPU power.
 

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