Question Intel Optane ?

Darkbreeze

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None. The capabilities of the drive don't change just because you add Optane memory to the system. Even if used as cache, it might SEEM speedier, but the actual completion of any operations to that drive will still be limited by the actual capabilities of that drive. It will still take the same amount of time to write a file of X size, no matter what. The only things that will change that are the size of the file and what it is being written FROM, but it will still not ever exceed the maximum capability of the drive itself. You can't make a drive faster or give it faster throughput by adding Optane or anything else to the system.
 
Feb 20, 2020
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None. The capabilities of the drive don't change just because you add Optane memory to the system. Even if used as cache, it might SEEM speedier, but the actual completion of any operations to that drive will still be limited by the actual capabilities of that drive. It will still take the same amount of time to write a file of X size, no matter what. The only things that will change that are the size of the file and what it is being written FROM, but it will still not ever exceed the maximum capability of the drive itself. You can't make a drive faster or give it faster throughput by adding Optane or anything else to the system.
I am using a 2.5 inch SATA Samsung EVO SSD. The write speed is around 490 MB/s. When copying a 50gb file from USB 3.0 flash drive using a USB 3.0 port, the speed is around 90 MB/s. Will OPTANE increase the 90 to maybe more?
 

MadsModsat

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Intel Optane is like a fast cache for a slow drive. Certain files will be available in this cahce depending on different factors, and can be accessed with very high speed, instead of reading from a slow HDD for example. It doesn't physically change how fast a disk can read / write. It is limited by the hardware itself. It is almost like using a RAM drive, except they don't store data when the PC is turned off (and don't have much capacity).

Optane isn't meant for transfering large files via USB, and if the files you are copying are larger than the Optane cache, it doesn't even make sense to use such a drive - you are better off spending your money on SSD external drives instead, they wil have similar read / write speeds to your internal drive you are using as an example in one of your posts.
 
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Feb 20, 2020
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Intel Optane is like a fast cache for a slow drive. Certain files will be available in this cahce depending on different factors, and can be accessed with very high speed, instead of reading from a slow HDD for example. It doesn't physically change how fast a disk can read / write. It is limited by the hardware itself. It is almost like a RAM drive, except they don't store data when the PC is turned off.

Optane isn't meant for transfering large files via USB, and if the files you are copying are larger than the Optane cache, it doesn't even make sense to use such a drive - you are better off spending your money on SSD external drives instead, they wil have similar read / write speeds to your internal drive you are using as an example in one of your posts.
I seeeeee. For Intel Optane 16 GB, does that mean there is now is a cache of 16 GB? That is so much, right ?
 

MadsModsat

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Yes. And some of the frequently accessed data from the HDD (or SSD for that matter) will be stored in the Intel Optane "drive" (and on the source drive off course). This data will change depending what is being used. But when the data from the Intel Optane cahce is written to the "permanent storage", so to speak, it will be written at the slower drive's performance. But this is not something you sit and wait for, it is happening in the background. It speeds up your workflow, but in the end, the original drive - the source - isn't any faster and is limited to the drive's controller and the interface it conects through.
 
Feb 20, 2020
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Yes. And some of the frequently accessed data from the HDD (or SSD for that matter) will be stored in the Intel Optane "drive" (and on the source drive off course). This data will change depending what is being used. But when the data from the Intel Optane cahce is written to the "permanent storage", so to speak, it will be written at the slower drive's performance. But this is not something you sit and wait for, it is happening in the background. It speeds up your workflow, but in the end, the original drive - the source - isn't any faster and is limited to the drive's controller and the interface it conects through.
Thankyou for replying. I have seen some people use Intel Optane with NVME ssds, is that un-necessary? Since NVME ssds, by themselves are already fast.
 

MadsModsat

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In my opinion that is unneccessary when it comes to fast NVMe drives, honestly I think it is overkill even for a SATA3 SSD. Intel Optane is not without its flaws, so before investing in such a drive, they are expensive, I highly recommend researching if the exact scenario you are going to be using it in, would actually benefit from Intel Optane.

It makes more sense to use Optane, in my opinion, if you need a very large storage capacity, but also need the snappier response from fast drives under certain circumstances.
But even then, I would look into consumer SSD solutions - for home use anyway.

I've seen af few articles where people have tested the various scenarios and storage types with Optane, some results were good, and in a lot of tests, it didn't result in any benefits at all. I'll try and see if I have perhaps bookmarked any of these, I don't completely remember right now.
 
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Darkbreeze

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Fast caching will make it SEEM as though an operation has completed faster, but the bottom line is that if the drive can only write 150Mbps sequential or whatever the spec for the drive is for random operations, then that is all it can do. There is NOTHING that will change that. That is how fast it will max out at no matter what. Installing optane as a cache isn't going to make a drive that is only capable of "X" speed suddenly capable of "Y" speed. It doesn't, and won't, work that way.

What it WILL do is make it SEEM like it has completed the operation faster. But in reality is has only finished copying or moving the data to the cache, it hasn't completed the transfer of the data to the drive itself.
 

Darkbreeze

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No it won't. You are limited by the read / write speed of whatever drive is connected to the USB port, no matter if it is a flash drive or an external HDD.
I do not see, or notice, at all, that they said anything about this being an external drive. In fact, if they believe installing optane will have an effect on it, it clearly ISN'T an external drive. Plus, the drive mentioned is clearly an internal HDD, not an external drive. I'm pretty sure they'd have mentioned it being an external drive or said something regarding an enclosure if that was the case. Perhaps you simply misunderstood the post.
 

USAFRet

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Thankyou for replying. I have seen some people use Intel Optane with NVME ssds, is that un-necessary? Since NVME ssds, by themselves are already fast.
That is absolutely a waste.
With a SATA SSD, that is also a waste.

With an HDD, in very limited circumstances, it is OK.
But...with falling SSD prices, the Optane is a solution in search of a problem.
 

MadsModsat

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I do not see, or notice, at all, that they said anything about this being an external drive. In fact, if they believe installing optane will have an effect on it, it clearly ISN'T an external drive. Plus, the drive mentioned is clearly an internal HDD, not an external drive. I'm pretty sure they'd have mentioned it being an external drive or said something regarding an enclosure if that was the case. Perhaps you simply misunderstood the post.

OP clearly refers to an external USB flash drive - see quote below -which is why I recommmend external SSD drives for speeding up the copying process and not Intel Optane which is designed for something completely different, which is also what I've been saying all along - including the fact that Intel Optane is definately not capable of boosting HDD and SSD drives beyond their hardware limited read / write speeds.
If OP wants to copy files from an external storage device via USB to his internal SSD drive, the only thing which will speed up that process to more than 90 MB/s, is using fatser external storage, for instance an external SSD drive.

I am using a 2.5 inch SATA Samsung EVO SSD. The write speed is around 490 MB/s. When copying a 50gb file from USB 3.0 flash drive using a USB 3.0 port, the speed is around 90 MB/s. Will OPTANE increase the 90 to maybe more?
 
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USAFRet

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I am using a 2.5 inch SATA Samsung EVO SSD. The write speed is around 490 MB/s. When copying a 50gb file from USB 3.0 flash drive using a USB 3.0 port, the speed is around 90 MB/s. Will OPTANE increase the 90 to maybe more?
Speed is determined by the slowest device in the chain.
Here, the USB flash drive and the USB interface.

You can have the fastest drive on the planet. The copy procedure will only go as fast as the flash drive can serve it up.
 
Feb 20, 2020
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OP clearly refers to an external USB flash drive - see quote below -which is why I recommmend external SSD drives for speeding up the copying process and not Intel Optane which is designed for something completely different, which is also what I've been saying all along - including the fact that Intel Optane is definately not capable of boosting HDD and SSD drives beyond their hardware limited read / write speeds.
If OP wants to copy files from an external storage device via USB to his internal SSD drive, the only thing which will speed up that process to more than 90 MB/s, is using fatser external storage, for instance an external SSD drive.
Hi, Thankyou for replying. Correct me if I'm wrong, so using an EXTERNAL SSD is better than USB drive when copying files TO internal ssd?
 

MadsModsat

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Hi, Thankyou for replying. Correct me if I'm wrong, so using an EXTERNAL SSD is better than USB drive when copying files TO internal ssd?
The fastet external USB harddrive, when copying TO (and from) your internal SSD drive, is a USB drive that contains an SSD as opposed to a USB drive with a mechanical HDD.

If you use an external USB SSD drive, you will see similar read / write speeds as your internal SATA3 SSD when copying files to and from either of the drives.

If you use an external mechanical HDD drive, you will se similar read / write speeds to an internal SATA3 mechanical HDD.

However, using the USB3.0 intereface, file transfer speeds are limited to 640MBps maximum, but it is well above most SATA3 SSDs read / write performance, and a lot more than your 90MBps USB flash drive.
 
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The fastet external USB harddrive, when copying TO (and from) your internal SSD drive, is a USB drive that contains an SSD as opposed to a USB drive with a mechanical HDD.

If you use an external USB SSD drive, you will see similar read / write speeds as your internal SATA3 SSD when copying files to and from either of the drives.

If you use an external mechanical HDD drive, you will se similar read / write speeds to an internal SATA3 mechanical HDD.

However, using the USB3.0 intereface, file transfer spees are limited to 640MBps mnaximum.
I don't understand the first part of your explanation, can you make it clearer?
 

MadsModsat

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Sorry, it was a bit messy, I admit.

What I was trying to explain is just, that an external USB3.0 portable drive, containing an SSD, will result in similar read/write speeds of an internal SSD. This is what you want.

The thing that I added about the USB 3.0 HDD (mechanical drive), was just to clarify they won't be as fast. This is what you don't want.

I mentioned it so you don't go out and buy any portable / external USB drive you come across, but one that actually contain an SSD, rather than a mechanical drive, which are a lot slower.

I hope this is more clear, otherwise just ask again and I will try to do it better. But English isn't my first language, so I may write some poor explanations sometimes.

____

External USB3 drive containing an SSD = Yes, buy this

External USB3 drive containg a mechanical HDD = No, this won't be the fastest solution if speed is the most important factor.


EDIT :
(Did you delete your comment? I seem to be replying to my own post suddenly, haha)
 
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Sorry, it was a bit messy, I admit.

What I was trying to explain is just, that an external USB3.0 portable drive, containing an SSD, will result in similar read/write speeds of an internal SSD. This is what you want.

The thing that I added about the USB 3.0 HDD (mechanical drive), was just to clarify they won't be as fast. This is what you don't want.

I mentioned it so you don't go out and buy any portable / external USB drive you come across, but one that actually contain an SSD, rather than a mechanical drive, which are a lot slower.

I hope this is more clear, otherwise just ask again and I will try to do it better. But English isn't my first language, so I may write some poor explanations sometimes.

____

External USB3 drive containing an SSD = Yes, buy this

External USB3 drive containg a mechanical HDD = No, this won't be the fastest solution if speed is the most important factor.


EDIT :
(Did you delete your comment? I seem to be replying to my own post suddenly, haha)
Hi, Yes, i deleted it after you gave your detailed explanation. Do you have any recommendations for external USB drive containing SSD?
 

MadsModsat

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Unfortunately I'm not very well aware of the best external SSDs, I usually buy external drives for high storage capacity, and no so much high read/write performance, so I don't even own any non-mechanical external USB drives myself.

I'm sure someone else will know much more about that category of drives, than I do.
 

Darkbreeze

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OP clearly refers to an external USB flash drive - see quote below -which is why I recommmend external SSD drives for speeding up the copying process and not Intel Optane which is designed for something completely different, which is also what I've been saying all along - including the fact that Intel Optane is definately not capable of boosting HDD and SSD drives beyond their hardware limited read / write speeds.
If OP wants to copy files from an external storage device via USB to his internal SSD drive, the only thing which will speed up that process to more than 90 MB/s, is using fatser external storage, for instance an external SSD drive.
You're right. I was referring to the original post. My appologies, but somehow I didn't even SEE that second post from them. My browser must have been playing tricks on me, which isn't unusual around here.
 

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