Discussion Intel prices after AMD 3rd gen launch

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Why would Intel lower their prices?

Haven't seen anything that would cause that to happen even with the latest updates. Take whatever is being said with a massive grain of salt. (Reality will hit in July once the new AMD CPUs are actually out) ;)

Then Intel is coming out with their new CPU's end of 2019 - Beginning of 2020.

So we will see what Intel comes up with.
I'm looking forward to Intel's counter. I feel like today is the equivalent to the AMD Phenom/Sandybridge era. There was the second gen Intel chips that had significantly higher boost clocks that could be overclocked well above 4ghz and that was the counter to AMD's Phenom ii hex core processor line. AMD had the higher core count then for example the AMD 1090T which was a six core chip but Intels quad core higher IPC sandybridge chips still surpassed them. Wouldn't it be something to have Intel's next gen chips boost significantly higher than they already do now? That'd be insane if the base clock was something like 4.5ghz and the boost almost hitting, if not reaching 6ghz. Though it may not be likely, i'd like to think it isn't out of the realm of possibility.
 

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Titan
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How much do you think the prices of the Intel CPUs will go down after the Ryzen 3000 launch?
The last time I remember Intel officially lowering MSRPs on its mainstream CPUs was around 14 years ago while it was still struggling to compete against AMD's Athlon 64s. I'm not expecting any official pricing reaction from Intel at the moment as reducing prices while the company is struggling to meet existing demand of its current products makes no sense. Intel's pattern since the Core2 has been to launch products and leave them at their launch MSRP until they are discontinued.

For Intel to officially drop prices, the Ryzen 3000s will have to make a deep enough gouge in the market for Intel to end up with excess inventory it needs to get rid of - a clear indication that the market is no longer putting up with its current prices. If this happens. It'll take a couple of months to get there, maybe in time for the holidays.

If Intel's mainstream sales don't get crashed hard by Ryzen 3k, then I'll expect Intel to simply advance its chip discontinuation schedule (start announcing "last order" and "last manufacture" dates for more 8k and some 9k series products) and use its 10k-series launch to do whatever pricing and spec adjustments it deems necessary.
 
I'm looking forward to Intel's counter. I feel like today is the equivalent to the AMD Phenom/Sandybridge era. There was the second gen Intel chips that had significantly higher boost clocks that could be overclocked well above 4ghz and that was the counter to AMD's Phenom ii hex core processor line. AMD had the higher core count then for example the AMD 1090T which was a six core chip but Intels quad core higher IPC sandybridge chips still surpassed them. Wouldn't it be something to have Intel's next gen chips boost significantly higher than they already do now? That'd be insane if the base clock was something like 4.5ghz and the boost almost hitting, if not reaching 6ghz. Though it may not be likely, i'd like to think it isn't out of the realm of possibility.
Yeah.

I am looking for to seeing what NOCTUA comes out with, new coolers or fans etc, you know something that might be interesting.

Maybe an update to the NH-D15 would be nice.
 

Corgoi

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Apr 12, 2019
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Yeah.

I am looking for to seeing what NOCTUA comes out with, new coolers or fans etc, you know something that might be interesting.

Maybe an update to the NH-D15 would be nice.
Or maybe they should start making aios ans give up on air as air cooling imo at this point is gonna start being useless on mid to high end builds
 
I know AMD focuses mainly on multi-core performance but lets be serious single core performance is still more important rn and it will be the same for next few years
According to AMD at least, the 3000-series will supposedly raise IPC by around 15% compared to their previous generation parts. That, coupled with higher clocks could result in around a 20% increase in per-core performance, though IPC can vary depending on the task at hand, and it remains to be seen what gaming performance will be like. I suspect AMD's processors will be able to perform very similar at substantially lower prices for a given number of cores and threads though.

Wouldn't it be something to have Intel's next gen chips boost significantly higher than they already do now?
At least going by some supposed leaked slides from Intel, it may potentially be as late as 2021 before Intel moves to a smaller process node than they have been at for the last several years. It sounds like next year's desktop chips will still be on 14nm, so I wouldn't expect them to offer much more performance per-core.
 
May 27, 2019
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As many have already said, I also highly doubt that Intel would low its prices as for now.

Even a 4th gen 4790K is expensive nowadays.
Intel has been always selling (or at least trying to sell) better performance per individual core, making the CPUs more powerful on single-core tasks, while AMD is selling better multi-core threaded performance (something good for many new games, specially those that are open-world and online oriented).

Even if they are competing, they different marketing approaches makes very unlikely for Intel to sell at cheaper prices.
 

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Titan
Moderator
As many have already said, I also highly doubt that Intel would low its prices as for now.

Even a 4th gen 4790K is expensive nowadays.
Intel discontinued the 4k series a long time ago, it has absolutely no control over the prices people still charge for these. People still try to sell them for high prices because they have them in stock and there are still people interested in those chips willing to pay such prices, usually for repair or legacy application reasons where an upgrade may not be feasible. The only thing that will drive obsolete parts' prices down is cheaper yet vastly superior new CPUs to make the old stuff clearly undesirable. Same thing is about to happen with Skylake, Intel issued the first round of product discontinuation notices for those a few months ago.
 
Or maybe they should start making aios ans give up on air as air cooling imo at this point is gonna start being useless on mid to high end builds
Why would they do that when the NH D15 still outperforms all AIO's that are even remotely close to it's price range?

And a lot of them that are even twice the cost or more of it.

That would be idiotic on Noctua's part.
 
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Titan
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Dumb, really dumb. A Noctua cooler is a precision engineered piece of hardware while your AIO is a gimmicky, cheap hunk of disposable junk.
Heat pipes are basically passive phase-change cooling, it would be difficult for plain liquid cooling to beat properly engineering pipes until the thermal load becomes too high for them. People get tricked into thinking that CLC is better because all that fluid takes a while to heat up under load. Once you are at steady state, a radiator is no better than a heatsink of similar surface area when made of metal, significantly worse when made of plastic.

From a purely functional standpoint, CLC isn't worth the additional more dramatic points of failure. Only makes sense if it is to reduce the likelihood of shipping damage in a fully assembled system.
 
Heat pipes are basically passive phase-change cooling, it would be difficult for plain liquid cooling to beat properly engineering pipes until the thermal load becomes too high for them. People get tricked into thinking that CLC is better because all that fluid takes a while to heat up under load. Once you are at steady state, a radiator is no better than a heatsink of similar surface area when made of metal, significantly worse when made of plastic.

From a purely functional standpoint, CLC isn't worth the additional more dramatic points of failure. Only makes sense if it is to reduce the likelihood of shipping damage in a fully assembled system.

Exactly correct.

But the massive push by the YT crowd etc has given a false impression that AIO's are better across the board.

Goes back to what I always point out.....

Bad threads normally start out with..... "I saw this YT video".... ;)

There is so much misinformation out there these days along with people parroting the same crap all over the forums like it's fact.

It really is unbelievable how bad it's gotten.

The really sad part is some people actually believe the nonsense. :rolleyes:
 
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How much do you think the prices of the Intel CPUs will go down after the Ryzen 3000 launch? Will the mb prices also go down?
What about the 2nd gen Ryzen's? I'm thinking 2nd gen Ryzens and X470 mb's will go down the most since Ryzen 3000 uses x570 mb's
Overall what do you guys think about 3rd gen performance and prices and what will the other CPUs prices be like after their launch
I think it will hurry to ask about the price drop in Intel. As for now trade war between US and China courses in Intel price drop in Asia Pacific. As prices are still high in US due to this. If we look the AMD 3rd generation factor over Intel price, expert writing that, might be 10% Intel market share could be moved to the AMD after 3rd generation launch. After it is not tested yet in market. End user doesn't experience these things yet. Unlike vega AMD has much expectations from this card. We have wait and watch the market and user experience how things going forward.
 

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Titan
Moderator
Intel isn't going to drop prices. They are going to counter with better performing chips.
At the moment, it looks more like Intel is unable to counter at all. It'll launch Comet Lake S as a stopgap measure and that'll be it until 10nm+/++ has good enough results and yields to launch new CPUs based on Sunny Cove. There is also the possibility that Intel isn't building any more 10nm fab capacity to focus on its leap to 7nm, in which case Sunny Cove for desktop might not happen until 2022.

It really looks like Intel is going to be mostly out of the desktop space for the next two years, doesn't look good no matter which way you hash what little is known about what is (not) happening over there.
 
At the moment, it looks more like Intel is unable to counter at all. It'll launch Comet Lake S as a stopgap measure and that'll be it until 10nm+/++ has good enough results and yields to launch new CPUs based on Sunny Cove. There is also the possibility that Intel isn't building any more 10nm fab capacity to focus on its leap to 7nm, in which case Sunny Cove for desktop might not happen until 2022.

It really looks like Intel is going to be mostly out of the desktop space for the next two years, doesn't look good no matter which way you hash what little is known about what is (not) happening over there.
Just because they didn't announce desktop sku's doesn't mean there won't be any. At least I hope they didn't give up that easy because I was looking forward to Intel's counter. That would be a lot of business that Intel would lose out on. Hopefully they'll surprise release some 10nm desktop chips in 2020 after the 9900ks in Q4 of 2019.
 

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Titan
Moderator
Just because they didn't announce desktop sku's doesn't mean there won't be any.
Go watch Intel's Icelake keynotes, compare specs to previous-gen, then re-read Broadwell history.

Everything about Icelake so far is an almost exact repeat of Broadwell. By the time Icelake launches for desktop and becomes available in any meaningful quantities, the next generation will be just about to launch.
 

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