News Intel Rocket Lake Release Date, Specifications, Performance, All We Know

JayNor

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I believe both Tiger Lake and Ice Lake Server chips doubled the ring bus bandwidth. relative to Ice Lake laptop. It will be interesting to see if that makes it into the Rocket Lake design.

Also ... PCIE3 cards are supposed to work on a PCIE4 bus, by design. In fact, authors commented that PCIE3 and PCIE4 functionality were demoed on Intel's FPGA PCIE5 chiplet implementation in 2019.
 
yayyy, more 14 nm option! :/

(This next Intel gen had better have quite a few tweaks, faster RAM speeds at 3600 MHz stock, etc., to fend off the Ryzen 5800X/5900X it seems, if the first few CPU-Z and Ashes leaks are accurate..)
 
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shady28

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PPL making comments about nanometer process tech - need to read this.

https://www.techpowerup.com/272489/intel-14-nm-node-compared-to-tsmcs-7-nm-node-using-scanning-electron-microscope

"The results? Well, the Intel 14 nm chip features transistors with a gate width of 24 nm, while the AMD/TSMC 7 nm one has a gate width of 22 nm (gate height is also rather similar). "

"Another interesting thing to note here, the gate width is not following the naming scheme as you might have expected. The 14 nm transistor isn't 14 nm in width, and the 7 nm transistor isn't 7 nm wide. The naming of the node and actual size of the node have had a departure a long time ago, and the naming convention is really up to the manufacturer - it's become more of a marketing gimmick than anything else. "
 
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ingtar33

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4 different clocked versions of their 8c/16t flagship?

so my friend at intel is right again. Intel is binning the ever loving <Mod Edit> out of their chips in this release, (to the point there is no overclock headroom) in order to factory overclock them. I mean what's the point of selling a K series chip if there is nothing to overclock intel? Then selling the chips that don't measure up and overclock as high as lower clocked versions. He said the yield on the top end part was so low that it would be essentially a paper chip, available only to reviewers. He said the yield to get those high clocks were so bad that at most there might be a couple thousand ever sold to the public as intel apparently takes a major loss in selling them.

I hope reviewers mention there is no overclock for these chips, and mention the fact that the top end chip will probably never see store shelves...
 
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yayyy, more 14 nm option! :/

(This next Intel gen had better have quite a few tweaks, faster RAM speeds at 3600 MHz stock, etc., to fend off the Ryzen 5800X/5900X it seems, if the first few CPU-Z and Ashes leaks are accurate..)
There are so few 5800/5900 around that they don't really need to compete, only the 5600 is decently available and for anything below that it's an AMD free market.
If they are just a little bit better than 10th gen they are going to sell them like crazy.
AMD only has three models right now, even if everybody that wants one of those three waits until they can get one it's not going to make much of a difference, everybody else that needs a different model is forced to go intel.
 
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Conahl

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ahh, there is the oh so usual positive spin on some negative towards intel, from the pro intel TerryLaze.

and what happens IF rocket lake is just hype, or the power usage of these chips is worse, priced too high, then to top that off, zen 3 starts to be come more available then it currently is ?

with intels track record from is PR teams the last few years, it would be better to take anything intel says. with a good cup of salt.
 
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and what happens IF rocket lake is just hype, or the power usage of these chips is worse, priced too high, then to top that off, zen 3 starts to be come more available then it currently is ?
The same thing that happens for the last three years will happen, intel will still sell everything.

Even if intel released the same 10th gen as 11gen and only left the new iGPU they would still make all the sales, now it has that it has the new arch it has pcie4 it has better memory clocks...it will sell at least as well as 10th gen.
 

hotaru251

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not interested.

hotter chip, less cores, minimalist boost over a more versatile/cooler amd chip for a chipset thats likely not gonna live long (casue intel)

sure, it can possibly be top gamign chip, but it gives up other uses for that and its near nil improvement.

and i still run an intel cpu :|

but i guess for the ppl who just dont liek amd chips this is good for them for sure.
 

InvalidError

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chip for a chipset thats likely not gonna live long (casue intel)
Well, AMD is only making its AGESA firmware compatible across three CPU generations before dropping support despite keeping the same socket for five product generations, so that is effectively only one more than Intel before you have to buy a new motherboard anyway.

Personally, I upgrade the CPU less than once per four years (still using an i5-3470), so it makes absolutely no difference to me how long a platform remains current, I'll need new everything every time regardless.
 

Gomez Addams

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Integrated graphics hold zero interest to me. I really don't understand why they would waste chip real estate on IGP for a high-end part. I have never heard of someone buying a high-end CPU without a similarly high-end GPU or near to it.
 

Don Frenser

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I assume this: "Rocket Lake-S represents 14nm's last hurrah on the desktop and marks the seventh and final iteration of the longest-lived leading-edge node in Intel's history (it debuted in 2015). ".

is wrong.

It should have said the LATEST 14nm iteration
 

dan1991Ro

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In my country a 10400f is cheaper than a 3600 and if they get a good hexacore at around 200 dollars,why not?I have a ryzen cpu in right now,but i dont care,if the price is good,i will just buy whatever is cheaper or faster.
 
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Integrated graphics hold zero interest to me. I really don't understand why they would waste chip real estate on IGP for a high-end part. I have never heard of someone buying a high-end CPU without a similarly high-end GPU or near to it.
Yeah everybody poos on intel for using 300W but then they are against using a 10-15W iGPU for web browsing and rather use a 300W GPU to do it...
There is a lot of software out there that uses the integrated and saves you not only a lot of time but also a lot of power, it's not 1998 anymore where everything would go through the x86 cores.
 
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InvalidError

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There is a lot of software out there that uses the integrated
Well, most software will use whatever the default graphics adapter is regardless of what it is or how much power it uses... and most motherboards disable the IGP by default when a dGPU is installed too.

The better way to put it is that it is pretty much only gamers and people who do CAD or use GPGPU who need dGPU. Most of the rest of the PC market is fine with IGP or GT1010/1030. Makes sense for Intel to include an IGP good enough for 80-90% of its desktop/laptop market in its mainstream CPUs, the remaining 10-20% are free to ignore the IGP and use whatever else it wants.
 

USAFRet

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Integrated graphics hold zero interest to me. I really don't understand why they would waste chip real estate on IGP for a high-end part. I have never heard of someone buying a high-end CPU without a similarly high-end GPU or near to it.
Spreadsheets, database, software design.
All those can easily live with an iGPU, but might need a big CPU.
 
Well, most software will use whatever the default graphics adapter is regardless of what it is or how much power it uses... and most motherboards disable the IGP by default when a dGPU is installed too.
It's much more complex than that.
Software will use the default gpu that the display is connected to, if you have dual and the iGPU is the main display everything will try to run on the iGPU, switch the main to the discreet and they will try to use that .
Windows 10 has a graphics option that allows you to select between power saving and performance and will use the iGPU or dGPU accordingly.
Some software will let you select from a list or will outright select the most powerful by itself.
Other software for example nvidia control panel has an option for cuda to use all available GPUs.

Also I never had a mobo that would disable the iGPU as long as I kept it plugged in.
 
How do you unplug your IGP? Guessing you must have meant "leave a monitor connected to it,"
Yup and actually you can even just plug in a virtual monitor to make windows use the iGPU.
 

Gomez Addams

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Well, most software will use whatever the default graphics adapter is regardless of what it is or how much power it uses... and most motherboards disable the IGP by default when a dGPU is installed too.

The better way to put it is that it is pretty much only gamers and people who do CAD or use GPGPU who need dGPU. Most of the rest of the PC market is fine with IGP or GT1010/1030. Makes sense for Intel to include an IGP good enough for 80-90% of its desktop/laptop market in its mainstream CPUs, the remaining 10-20% are free to ignore the IGP and use whatever else it wants.
That's true the first five or six laptops I used or owned all had only an integrated graphics adapter. However, none of the last three did or do. I get only discrete graphics adapters now because my workload has changed considerably and it's not because of games either - they are just an added bonus.
 

JamesJones44

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PPL making comments about nanometer process tech - need to read this.

https://www.techpowerup.com/272489/intel-14-nm-node-compared-to-tsmcs-7-nm-node-using-scanning-electron-microscope

"The results? Well, the Intel 14 nm chip features transistors with a gate width of 24 nm, while the AMD/TSMC 7 nm one has a gate width of 22 nm (gate height is also rather similar). "

"Another interesting thing to note here, the gate width is not following the naming scheme as you might have expected. The 14 nm transistor isn't 14 nm in width, and the 7 nm transistor isn't 7 nm wide. The naming of the node and actual size of the node have had a departure a long time ago, and the naming convention is really up to the manufacturer - it's become more of a marketing gimmick than anything else. "
Yep. People over fixate on this just like they did back in the day about MHz. What transistor node the chip is built on really doesn't tell you anything useful, it's just another number in a large set of factors. Does a small node help with things? Of course, so does a higher clock speed, but in the end, neither tells you how well the "chip" performs.
 

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