Intel SSD 710 Tested: MLC NAND Flash Hits The Enterprise

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whysobluepandabear

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TLDR; Although expensive, the drives offer greater amounts of data transfer, reliability and expected life - however, they cost a f'ing arm and a leg (even for a corporation).

Expect these to be the standard when they've dropped to 1/3rd their current price.
 

nekromobo

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I think the writer missed the whole point on this article.

What happens when you RAID5 or RAID1 the SSD's??
I don't think any enterprise would trust a single SSD without RAID.
 

halcyon

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[citation][nom]__-_-_-__[/nom]with the reliability those have they will never ever find their way into any server[/citation]
My Vertex 3 has been very reliable and I'm quite satisfied with the performance. However, I've heard reports that some, just like with anything else, haven't been so lucky.
 

toms my babys daddy

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I thought ssd drives were unreliable because they can die at any moment and lose your data, and now I see that they're used for servers as well? are they doing daily backups of their data or have I been lied to? ;(
 

halcyon

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[citation][nom]toms my babys daddy[/nom]I thought ssd drives were unreliable because they can die at any moment and lose your data, and now I see that they're used for servers as well? are they doing daily backups of their data or have I been lied to? ;([/citation]
SSDs are generally accepted to be more reliable than HDDs...at least that's what I've been lead to believe.
 

Onus

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[citation][nom]halcyon[/nom]SSDs are generally accepted to be more reliable than HDDs...at least that's what I've been lead to believe.[/citation]
Yes, but when they die, that's it; you're done. You can at least send a mechanical HDD to Ontrack (or a competing data recovery service) with a GOOD chance of getting most or all of your data back; when a SSD bricks, what can be done?
 

CaedenV

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[citation][nom]nekromobo[/nom]I think the writer missed the whole point on this article.What happens when you RAID5 or RAID1 the SSD's??I don't think any enterprise would trust a single SSD without RAID.[/citation]
The assumption is that ALL servers will have raid. The point of this article is how often will you have to replace the drives in your raid? All of that down time, and manpower has a price. If the old Intel SSDs were about as reliable as a traditional HDD, then that means that these new ones will last ~30x what a traidional drive does, while providing that glorious 0ms seek time, and high IO output.
Less replacement, less down time, less $/GB, and a similar performance is a big win in my book.
[citation][nom]toms my babys daddy[/nom]I thought ssd drives were unreliable because they can die at any moment and lose your data, and now I see that they're used for servers as well? are they doing daily backups of their data or have I been lied to? ;([/citation]
SSDs (at least on the enterprise level) are roughly equivalent to their mechanical brothers in failure rate. True, when the drive is done then the data is gone, but real data centers all use RAID, and backups for redundancy. Some go so far as to have all data being mirrored at 2 locations in real time, which is an extreme measure, but worth it when your data is so important.
Besides, when a data center has to do a physical recovery of a HDD then they have already failed. The down time it takes to physically recover is unacceptable in many data centers. Though at least it is still an option.
 
G

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Lied to about what? And who are THEY? ... Life expectancy of SSD vs. Standard Harddrive? Thats always unknown, every unit is an animal unto itself. SSD's don't suffer mechanical issues however putting them ahead in my mind. Backups are determined by how much time you can afford to loose business-wise, how much data you have and how long it takes to recover to a point you backup at last. maybe your data is too valuable to have lost. In that case Mirror and even copy to a DR site, maybe even live. Best thing would probably be to trust your IT guy because you kinda seem lost :)
 

halcyon

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[citation][nom]jtt283[/nom]Yes, but when they die, that's it; you're done. You can at least send a mechanical HDD to Ontrack (or a competing data recovery service) with a GOOD chance of getting most or all of your data back; when a SSD bricks, what can be done?[/citation]
Its funny you mention that. Ontrack purports that they are quite adept at recovering SSDs.
 

ruddenberg

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Andrew Ku! Get the facts correct please !!!!

Intel® SSD 710 Series 300/200/100GB
Random Read (8GB Span) = no info
Random Read (100% Span) = 38500/38500/38500 IOPS
Random Write (8GB Span) = no info
Random Write (100% Span) = 2000/2700/2300 IOPS

Intel® SSD 320 Series 600/300/160/120/80GB
Random Read (8GB Span) = 39500/39500/39000/38000/38000 IOPS
Random Read (100% Span) = 39500/39500/39000/38000/38000 IOPS
Random Write (8GB Span) = 23000/23000/21000/14000/10000 IOPS
Random Write (100% Span) = 150/400/600/400/300 IOPS

http://ark.intel.com/compare/56577,56576,56585,56584,56583,56569,56567,56565,56563,56571,56568
 

cmartin011

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This is the best intel could come up with? i know reliability is important and all, but make the performance worth the price. at those dollar $ a much quicker PCI express solution could be afforded with some sorta redundant feature build in.
 

acku

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[citation][nom]ruddenberg[/nom]Andrew Ku! Get the facts correct please !!!!Intel® SSD 710 Series 300/200/100GBRandom Read (8GB Span) = no infoRandom Read (100% Span) = 38500/38500/38500 IOPSRandom Write (8GB Span) = no infoRandom Write (100% Span) = 2000/2700/2300 IOPSIntel® SSD 320 Series 600/300/160/120/80GBRandom Read (8GB Span) = 39500/39500/39000/38000/38000 IOPSRandom Read (100% Span) = 39500/39500/39000/38000/38000 IOPSRandom Write (8GB Span) = 23000/23000/21000/14000/10000 IOPSRandom Write (100% Span) = 150/400/600/400/300 IOPS[/citation]
Read page 8. we covered that already.
 

campb292

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I find all the comments about data recovery very bizarre. What data would someone supposedly keep on a SSD (or HDD for that matter) that meets a threshold to warrant expensive data recovery in the event of failure, but not so sensitive to warrant a backup?

My important info has a fresh original image and 2 daily backups that automatically create 12 hours apart. It takes about 5 minutes each and costs 29.99 a year. Come on people.
 

beenthere

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This looks like more "experimenting" to see what enterprise will tolerate than a technical breakthrough. So far neither consumer grade nor the Intel 710 enterprise SSD impress me for performance, reliability and compatibility. It's certainly a painfully slow development on SSDs. Using consumers to beta test these drives is pretty unscrupulous IMO.
 

halcyon

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[citation][nom]pjmelect[/nom]I wish that Tom's were to put a few SSD's in there server, is it just me or does Tomshardware site run very slowly.[/citation]

I think it may just be you. :(
 

halcyon

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[citation][nom]memadmax[/nom]So it's an SSD thats designed to live for as long as possible in a brutal server environment.Sweet.[/citation]
Pretty much. ...and now I would like 2 of them in RAID 0 for my Mac Pro, ...and another 2 for my MacBook Pros, I'll ...um test their performance and reliability for Intel. I won't even charge them for my services...this time. Thank you very much ;)
 
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