• Now's your chance win big! Join our community and get entered to win a RTX 2060 GPU, plus more! Join here.

    Meet Stan Dmitriev of SurrogateTV on the Pi Cast TODAY! The show is live August 11th at 2:30 pm ET (7:30 PM BST). Watch live right here!

    Professional PC modder Mike Petereyns joins Scharon on the Tom's Hardware Show live on Thursday, August 13th at 3:00 pm ET (8:00 PM BST). Click here!

Question intel stock cooler help

darklord.dl62

Commendable
Jan 23, 2018
21
0
1,510
0
i noticed my pc temps are going above 90c when playing games and 40c on idle, if i remove my intel stock cooler and clean it then reapply new thermal paste(arctic mx-4) will my temps be lower? when i first got my pc my temps were 30c when browsing, etc and full load at 60c+
 

Furzumz

Upstanding
May 28, 2020
263
36
240
12
Could certainly be worth a shot reapplying some new paste, just make sure to apply the proper amount. Thermal paste can dry out over the course of some years

Have you been cleaning the dust out of your computer using a can of compressed air? If you have a super dusty computer that can also cause some major heating problems.

Also check to make sure your CPU fan is still spinning

If you're unsure of how much paste to use I recommend watching this:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYwHB2P6GmM
 

darklord.dl62

Commendable
Jan 23, 2018
21
0
1,510
0
Could certainly be worth a shot reapplying some new paste, just make sure to apply the proper amount. Thermal paste can dry out over the course of some years

Have you been cleaning the dust out of your computer using a can of compressed air? If you have a super dusty computer that can also cause some major heating problems.

Also check to make sure your CPU fan is still spinning

If you're unsure of how much paste to use I recommend watching this:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYwHB2P6GmM

I’ve been cleaning it with a paintbrush lol, but without removing it because i dont have any thermal paste to replace the old one, that’s why i’ve been planning on buying a new thermal paste so i can apply it. I don’t have any compressed air either but i’ll buy one too since u mentioned it. would a extra case fan help too?
 

Furzumz

Upstanding
May 28, 2020
263
36
240
12
I’ve been cleaning it with a paintbrush lol, but without removing it because i dont have any thermal paste to replace the old one, that’s why i’ve been planning on buying a new thermal paste so i can apply it. I don’t have any compressed air either but i’ll buy one too since u mentioned it. would a extra case fan help too?
I wouldn't recommend a paint brush as there's a lot of crevices a paint brush can't get into. Definitely get a can of compressed air and use it to clean out your system

If you have a spot to mount it a extra case fan could help out a bit as well.

Which CPU do you have? Some of the higher power draw Intel chips, particularly the 'k' SKU processors simply generate too much heat for the Intel stock cooler to handle and you need an aftermarket cooler.
He mentioned his temperatures were much lower when he first got that processor / computer with about 30c brwosing and 60c+ under full load

I suspect this is more a case of overheating due to dust / old thermal paste
 

darklord.dl62

Commendable
Jan 23, 2018
21
0
1,510
0
Which CPU do you have? Some of the higher power draw Intel chips, particularly the 'k' SKU processors simply generate too much heat for the Intel stock cooler to handle and you need an aftermarket cooler.
my cpu is just an i3 4170 and I am planning to buy a deep cool gammax 400, i just dont know if it’ll fit in my motherboard which is a biostar h81mhv3 because the ram is ontop of my cooler and the gammax 400 is vertical, unless i can place it horizontally?
 

darklord.dl62

Commendable
Jan 23, 2018
21
0
1,510
0
I wouldn't recommend a paint brush as there's a lot of crevices a paint brush can't get into. Definitely get a can of compressed air and use it to clean out your system

If you have a spot to mount it a extra case fan could help out a bit as well.



He mentioned his temperatures were much lower when he first got that processor / computer with about 30c brwosing and 60c+ under full load

I suspect this is more a case of overheating due to dust / old thermal paste
my pc is quite dusty on some parts because i dont have any compressed air to clean out the dust on hard to reach areas and the thermal paste on my pc is 2 years now or more and i dont even know if the thermal paste they used is good
 

Furzumz

Upstanding
May 28, 2020
263
36
240
12
=
my pc is quite dusty on some parts because i dont have any compressed air to clean out the dust on hard to reach areas and the thermal paste on my pc is 2 years now or more and i dont even know if the thermal paste they used is good
The thermal paste that comes with coolers is usually just good enough. But a decent after market paste should be better. I wouldn't be surprised if the stock paste it came with became brittle after 2 or 3 years

That dust build up can certainly hold heat in, grab a can of compressed air off amazon if you can

my cpu is just an i3 4170 and I am planning to buy a deep cool gammax 400, i just dont know if it’ll fit in my motherboard which is a biostar h81mhv3 because the ram is ontop of my cooler and the gammax 400 is vertical, unless i can place it horizontally?
That processor has a max allowed temperature of 72c so you're way over the safe limit

As for the clearance its hard to tell. Only real way to know is to measure in there to give yourself a rough idea

If you want to play it safe you can go with a lower profile CPU cooler. You don't necessarily need anything too crazy for an i3
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
That processor has a max allowed temperature of 72c so you're way over the safe limit
Furzumz,

Although you're correct that darklord.dl62's i3-4170 is too hot at 90°C, the "max allowed temperature" of 72°C that you posted above is not correct. Don't feel singled out; you're not the first person to misinterpret Intel's thermal specifications, and you certainly won't be the last, because Intel's definitions and terminology are tricky. For the benefit of other forum members and our visiting readers, we'll clear up the confusion.

The thermal specification for the i3-4170 that's shown on Intel's Product Specifications website is "Tcase", which has been misleading users since 2006.

Tcase is not Core temperature.

Users can't measure Tcase; it's a factory only thermal measurement performed on engineering samples using a thermocouple sensor embedded on the external surface of the Integrated Heat Spreader (IHS) where the cooler is seated. Retail processors do not have this sensor, so you can't measure IHS temperature (Tcase), nor are there any monitoring utilities to display it.

Core temperatures are instead measured deep within the Cores at the transistor "Junctions" which are the heat sources where temperatures are highest. This means the temperature is significantly lower on the IHS underneath the cooler.

For 4th generation desktop processors, Intel's thermal specification for maximum Core temperature, which is also called Tj Max (Temperature Junction Maximum) or "Throttle" temperature is 100°C.

Intel's Product Specifications website, which is a quick reference, instead uses the term "Tjunction". Intel used Tcase for 6th generation and earlier processors, then switched to Tjunction for 7th generation and later. However, both Tcase and Tjunction thermal specifications are shown on Intel's Datasheets (see pages 67 & 73), which are detailed technical documents, that unlike the website, use proper terminology.

The processor's generation determines which of the two thermal specifications is shown on the Product Specifications website. Intel's intended purpose for providing Tcase specifications was primarily for developers of aftermarket cooling solutions.

For the record:

Tcase Max is a specification value for CPU coolers
Tcase is IHS temperature

Tj Max is a specification limit for Throttle protection
Tjunction is Core temperature

If you'd like to get up to speed on this topic, Tom's has a guide for it. Just click on the link below in my signature.

darklord.dl62,

Intel's stock coolers are notorious for the push-pins to stretch over time, or pop loose from the motherboard, so dust may not be the only problem; check for a loose push-pin. Additionally, be aware that although the GAMMAXX 400 is a decent cooler, it also uses push-pins. You might want to instead select another inexpensive cooler that has proper fastening hardware with a backplate.

CT :sol:
 
Reactions: Furzumz

darklord.dl62

Commendable
Jan 23, 2018
21
0
1,510
0
Furzumz,

Although you're correct that darklord.dl62's i3-4170 is too hot at 90°C, the "max allowed temperature" of 72°C that you posted above is not correct. Don't feel singled out; you're not the first person to misinterpret Intel's thermal specifications, and you certainly won't be the last, because Intel's definitions and terminology are tricky. For the benefit of other forum members and our visiting readers, we'll clear up the confusion.

The thermal specification for the i3-4170 that's shown on Intel's Product Specifications website is "Tcase", which has been misleading users since 2006.

Tcase is not Core temperature.

Users can't measure Tcase; it's a factory only thermal measurement performed on engineering samples using a thermocouple sensor embedded on the external surface of the Integrated Heat Spreader (IHS) where the cooler is seated. Retail processors do not have this sensor, so you can't measure IHS temperature (Tcase), nor are there any monitoring utilities to display it.

Core temperatures are instead measured deep within the Cores at the transistor "Junctions" which are the heat sources where temperatures are highest. This means the temperature is significantly lower on the IHS underneath the cooler.

For 4th generation desktop processors, Intel's thermal specification for maximum Core temperature, which is also called Tj Max (Temperature Junction Maximum) or "Throttle" temperature is 100°C.

Intel's Product Specifications website, which is a quick reference, instead uses the term "Tjunction". Intel used Tcase for 6th generation and earlier processors, then switched to Tjunction for 7th generation and later. However, both Tcase and Tjunction thermal specifications are shown on Intel's Datasheets (see pages 67 & 73), which are detailed technical documents, that unlike the website, use proper terminology.

The processor's generation determines which of the two thermal specifications is shown on the Product Specifications website. Intel's intended purpose for providing Tcase specifications was primarily for developers of aftermarket cooling solutions.

For the record:

Tcase Max is a specification value for CPU coolers
Tcase is IHS temperature

Tj Max is a specification limit for Throttle protection
Tjunction is Core temperature

If you'd like to get up to speed on this topic, Tom's has a guide for it. Just click on the link below in my signature.

darklord.dl62,

Intel's stock coolers are notorious for the push-pins to stretch over time, or pop loose from the motherboard, so dust may not be the only problem; check for a loose push-pin. Additionally, be aware that although the GAMMAXX 400 is a decent cooler, it also uses push-pins. You might want to instead select another inexpensive cooler that has proper fastening hardware with a backplate.

CT :sol:

about a better cooler, I was originally planning to get the hyper 212 led(not the evo one) but I don't know if it'll fit because it's supposed to be installed vertically right? well If I install it vertically, I won't be able to install my ram and I don't know if It's ok to install it horizontally..
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
Yes, provided that your case has a rear and a top fan that are both oriented as exhaust, and front fan(s) as intake, which is the standard configuration for optimal airflow, then any Hyper 212 variant should work well in a bottom to top airflow orientation.

However, that may not be necessary if you install the memory modules before installing the cooler, but keep in mind that if you ever need to troubleshoot or replace memory, you'll have to remove and reinstall the cooler.

Also, since your i3-4170 is not overclockable and is only 54 Watts TDP, the Hyper 212 is considerable overkill. Nevertheless, it does have a backplate, and you can always use the cooler on your next rig.

CT :sol:
 
Check that your stock cooler has not come loose.
Look at the back of your motherboard to verify that all 4 push pins are through the motherboard and locked.

----------------how to mount the stock Intel cooler--------------

The stock Intel cooler can be tricky to install.
A poor installation will result in higher cpu temperatures.
If properly mounted, you should expect temperatures at idle to be 10-15c. over ambient.

To mount the Intel stock cooler properly, place the motherboard on top of the foam or cardboard backing that was packed with the motherboard.
The stock cooler will come with paste pre applied, it looks like three grey strips.
The 4 push pins should come in the proper position for installation, that is with the pins rotated in the opposite direction of the arrow,(clockwise)
and pulled up as far as they can go.
Take the time to play with the pushpin mechanism until you know how they work.

Orient the 4 pins so that they are exactly over the motherboard holes.
If one is out of place, you will damage the pins which are delicate.
Push down on a DIAGONAL pair of pins at the same time. Then the other pair.

When you push down on the top black pins, it expands the white plastic pins to fix the cooler in place.

If you do them one at a time, you will not get the cooler on straight.
Lastly, look at the back of the motherboard to verify that all 4 pins are equally through the motherboard, and that the cooler is on firmly.
This last step must be done, which is why the motherboard should be out of the case to do the job. Or you need a case with a opening that lets you see the pins.
It is possible to mount the cooler with the motherboard mounted in the case, but you can then never be certain that the push pins are inserted properly
unless you can verify that the pins are through the motherboard and locked.

If you should need to remove the cooler, turn the pins counter clockwise to unlock them.
You will need to clean off the old paste and reapply new if you ever take the cooler off.
Clean off old paste with alcohol and a lint free paper like a coffee filter.
Apply new paste sparingly. A small rice sized drop in the center will spread our under heat and pressure.
Too much paste is bad, it will act as an insulator.
It is hard to use too little.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Your processor is not overclocked and does not need special cooling.
If you do want to buy an aftermarket cooler, most all will fit your motherboard.
What may limit your choice is how much headroom your case has available.
The gammax 400 you mentioned needs 155mm.
It is also a pushpin mount.
I found the hyper212 cooler to be difficult to mount also. It needs 158mm.
The easiest coolers to mount come from noctua.

Any cooler needs a decent source of fresh air to let it do it's job.
Check your case for this.

Not to worry.
While 90c. is high, it is not dangerous.
The processor monitors it's temperature and will slow down or turn off if it detects a dangerous temperature.
That is around 100c.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY