Question Intel stops producing Optane SSDs!!!

No
Intel will not stop producing optane ssds, but stop producing consumer optane ssds.
Prosumer/Workstation optane still exists, and so does "Server ssds", and also also, Optane dimms, that are used to cheaply add terabytes of memory to a system are very prevalent.
The reason they are discontinuing these, is because they don't sell well.

What gamer or home pc enthusiast wants to pay 3X as much for half the capacity, and get like, 1/3rd a second faster windows boot time?
 
Reactions: Krotow

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
I wouldn't mind a pc thats only storage is optane, including ram. Combining both into one form was a good idea.
I know optane ram exists on server end

Hopefully it comes back when its ready to replace both.

the speed difference isn't a good reason to upgrade, but that is also case from pcie3 to 4, you really can't tell the difference the faster it gets.
 
Reactions: Endre

Endre

Notable
Apr 30, 2019
565
87
990
8
No
Intel will not stop producing optane ssds, but stop producing consumer optane ssds.
Prosumer/Workstation optane still exists, and so does "Server ssds", and also also, Optane dimms, that are used to cheaply add terabytes of memory to a system are very prevalent.
The reason they are discontinuing these, is because they don't sell well.

What gamer or home pc enthusiast wants to pay 3X as much for half the capacity, and get like, 1/3rd a second faster windows boot time?
Actually, I had in mind to buy a 280GB or 380GB Intel 905P or 900P SSD as my boot drive as prices would’ve dropped (at least a bit).
Not many people think like that, but I was one of those who did.
 
That would only work for low end, maybe up to low-mid range.
For a speedy system you would still want to have a decent amount of fast ram for fast calculations since not everything is just limited by fast access times to data.
Optane is 10X slower than ram, and as ram gets faster, that gap is getting bigger.
I disagree with you on that front, optane as ram would only make sense in servers, and never on desktops.
Desktops need that snappyness, and less capacity, even on super low end.
Servers sometimes don't need the speed at all, just faster than SSDs, but terabytes on petabytes of capacity.
 

Endre

Notable
Apr 30, 2019
565
87
990
8
I
One of the few sadly.
What is your personal reason for it, and not say, a normal pcie ssd? or even a sata one at that?
I already have 2 NVMe PCIe 3.0 drives: Samsung 970 Pro 1TB (as main drive), Samsung 970 EVO Plus 250GB (secondary drive); and a SATA drive: Kingston HyperX Savage 240GB.
But I was interested into a drive that’s 100 times more durable, reliable, and faster.
 
I


I already have 2 NVMe PCIe 3.0 drives: Samsung 970 Pro 1TB (as main drive), Samsung 970 EVO Plus 250GB (secondary drive); and a SATA drive: Kingston HyperX Savage 240GB.
But I was interested into a drive that’s 100 times more durable, reliable, and faster.
They are not faster in any meaningful way for consumers, and actually, samsung ssds are considered more reliable, and actually have a technology in the works to combat optane, called Z-nand.
As for durability, yes, Optane is better, BUT what consumer has ever maxed out an ssd.
I have a 970 Pro 512 gig, and I format it every 3-6 months, and I don't intend on swapping it anytime soon.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
As for durability, yes, Optane is better, BUT what consumer has ever maxed out an ssd.
I take it you've never used a 120Gb ssd as a boot/primary drive. Many ppl have, and unless you spend regular amounts of time in reorganizing and fine tuning storage directions, once that older ssd gets past 50% ish, you find it starts slowing down.

And yes, I've burned out a 120Gb Mushkin, although the Samsung 840 Pro I have is still running good.

Optanes problem is its limited usefulness. It's an expensive addition that doesn't yield visible day-to-day benefits for the Average Joe. If it had the same impact as moving from HDD to SSD, that'd be one thing, but it's effectively not much different than SSD to NVMe overall.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
137,474
7,007
166,340
21,157
Optanes problem is its limited usefulness. It's an expensive addition that doesn't yield visible day-to-day benefits for the Average Joe. If it had the same impact as moving from HDD to SSD, that'd be one thing, but it's effectively not much different than SSD to NVMe overall.
This.
We are rapidly getting into diminishing returns.

HDD to SSD was huge.
Different flavors of SSD, not so much.

If we go from a 10 second operation to 2 seconds, that is immediately beneficial. And seen in just a typical Excel spreadsheet.
If we go from 1 second to 0.2 sec....meh. Many regular users wouldn't even notice.
Same % difference.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
and thats forgetting the 32gb ssd put into laptops as cache drives and later discovered by windows when its reinstalling onto a new drive once hdd is dead/replaced. I seen Win 10 install itself on drives this small. They sure confuse owners who didn't know it was there.

optane was used by same laptop makers again to make the same crappy hdd look faster, optane cache drive let intel reuse Intel Rapid Storage Tech again.
 

Endre

Notable
Apr 30, 2019
565
87
990
8
and thats forgetting the 32gb ssd put into laptops as cache drives and later discovered by windows when its reinstalling onto a new drive once hdd is dead/replaced. I seen Win 10 install itself on drives this small. They sure confuse owners who didn't know it was there.

optane was used by same laptop makers again to make the same crappy hdd look faster, optane cache drive let intel reuse Intel Rapid Storage Tech again.
Optane memory drives were never interesting for me, but Optane SSDs are cool!
 
I take it you've never used a 120Gb ssd as a boot/primary drive. Many ppl have, and unless you spend regular amounts of time in reorganizing and fine tuning storage directions, once that older ssd gets past 50% ish, you find it starts slowing down.

And yes, I've burned out a 120Gb Mushkin, although the Samsung 840 Pro I have is still running good.

Optanes problem is its limited usefulness. It's an expensive addition that doesn't yield visible day-to-day benefits for the Average Joe. If it had the same impact as moving from HDD to SSD, that'd be one thing, but it's effectively not much different than SSD to NVMe overall.
Okay, but 120gig ssds are not that common anymore, with most people going for 256 or higher, also, drives with DRAM suffer much less from these slowdowns.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS