News Intel's 35W 'Alder Lake' T-Series CPUs Sneak into Retail

King_V

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This has always somewhat been an unclear point for me. Intel and AMD both offer lower-power versions of their standard processors, for the desktop.

Typically, the base clock rate is significantly lower, and the boost clock rate is either the same as the standard CPU, or only slightly lower.

But, speaking for both companies' CPUs, if they're going to boost like that, won't that simply mean they're not staying in their power draw rating?

And if they still do manage to stay in their power range, are they really boosting as high as claimed? And, what's the net effect on performance compared to the equivalent CPU with equivalent clocks that are not the power powered version? (T or TE for Intel, E for AMD)
 

spongiemaster

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Dec 12, 2019
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This has always somewhat been an unclear point for me. Intel and AMD both offer lower-power versions of their standard processors, for the desktop.

Typically, the base clock rate is significantly lower, and the boost clock rate is either the same as the standard CPU, or only slightly lower.

But, speaking for both companies' CPUs, if they're going to boost like that, won't that simply mean they're not staying in their power draw rating?

And if they still do manage to stay in their power range, are they really boosting as high as claimed? And, what's the net effect on performance compared to the equivalent CPU with equivalent clocks that are not the power powered version? (T or TE for Intel, E for AMD)
Base clock is for all cores. Boost clocks are typically for fewer cores. At 35W, a single Alder Lake P core should be able to boost around 5Ghz forever and stay within that power limit.
 

jp7189

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Feb 21, 2012
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This has always somewhat been an unclear point for me. Intel and AMD both offer lower-power versions of their standard processors, for the desktop.

Typically, the base clock rate is significantly lower, and the boost clock rate is either the same as the standard CPU, or only slightly lower.

But, speaking for both companies' CPUs, if they're going to boost like that, won't that simply mean they're not staying in their power draw rating?

And if they still do manage to stay in their power range, are they really boosting as high as claimed? And, what's the net effect on performance compared to the equivalent CPU with equivalent clocks that are not the power powered version? (T or TE for Intel, E for AMD)
The lower tdp parts hit similar performance but for very short periods. Maybe long enough to get through an application launch before returning to steady state. Therefore they feel snappy for a user interface, but aren't meant for fulltime, high powered crunching of the big boys.
 

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