Intel's 50Gbps Thunderbolt Successor by 2015

Status
Not open for further replies.

woffle

Distinguished
Jan 29, 2011
4
0
18,510
Best answers
0
"Intel expects the new tech to help propel the successors of 1080p into consumer living rooms. As it stands now, image resolutions are slated to quadruple by the middle of the year"

Which tv's are going to have a resolution of ~5800x3300 by mid of the year?
 

dark_lord69

Splendid
Jun 6, 2006
3,218
0
22,160
Best answers
351
They are talking about short distances like in your home... That's all fine and dandy but ISP's can't go anywhere near that speed.

My ISP Connection:
6 mbps

This Technology:
50,000 mbps

I guess I just fail to see the need for this technology.
OK, so you've got a new 4320p HDTV I don't think blue ray can do more than 1080p so a new player would need to be released and perhaps you could connect a PC or tablet to a computer for an insanely HD picture but as I said.. I fail to see a need for it and for TV's that are even HIGHER definition. I'm fine with my 1080p.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Oh great, all those people who bought all the thunderbolt hardware are going to have to upgrade to this new technology or be left behind.

Oh, wait... No one bought into the thunderbolt technology to begin with...
 

cmartin011

Distinguished
Jan 15, 2010
319
0
18,780
Best answers
0
i would want more performance out of my 40in tv 2X resolution 4X the native refresh rate infinite contrast .01ms response time for just 2D picture. so that would be 3840x2160 240 new frames a seconds and near instant response i do not know if that requires 50 gigabytes a second i doubt it lol
 

subasteve5800

Distinguished
Sep 15, 2010
316
0
18,810
Best answers
20
I thought they already had this, then couldn't make it work so they swapped out the optics for copper and gave us Thunderbolt. I guess it saves R&D money if you can just continually announce the same technology.
 

mianmian

Distinguished
Jul 24, 2009
123
0
18,680
Best answers
0
At 2015, Intel rep:
Well, we find it too expensive to make a 50Gbps fiber link. Here is our new product that bundles 5 thunderbolt cables...
 

someguynamedmatt

Distinguished
Feb 7, 2010
1,551
0
20,160
Best answers
165
[citation][nom]woffle[/nom]"Intel expects the new tech to help propel the successors of 1080p into consumer living rooms. As it stands now, image resolutions are slated to quadruple by the middle of the year"Which tv's are going to have a resolution of ~5800x3300 by mid of the year?[/citation]
Which GPUs are going to support that resolution, is what I'd like to know. Actually, I guess it wouldn't be so bad as long as you didnt plan on doing any gaming whatsoever at that resolution...
 

mikem_90

Distinguished
Jun 24, 2010
449
0
18,780
Best answers
0
Agent K: "Guess I'll have to buy the white album again."

Blue ray is already just slowly starting to get a bit more foothold, they want to usurp it already? Sheeeeesh.
 

stevo777

Distinguished
Jan 8, 2008
247
0
18,680
Best answers
0
[citation][nom]filmman03[/nom]well considering that we have the Canon 5D and 7D cameras, it isn't impossible, however probably unlikely this year or next.as far as the Thunderbolt, well that's good news for those Apple Fanboys, they will get to use the tech a year after its released w/ the new line of Mac's![/citation]

I'm pretty sure he meant to say decade and not year. So, by 2015 when the newer Thunderbolt tech comes. Personally, I'll believe it when I see it.
 

dragonsqrrl

Distinguished
Nov 19, 2009
1,280
0
19,290
Best answers
3
[citation][nom]woffle[/nom]"Intel expects the new tech to help propel the successors of 1080p into consumer living rooms. As it stands now, image resolutions are slated to quadruple by the middle of the year"Which tv's are going to have a resolution of ~5800x3300 by mid of the year?[/citation]
Dude, check your math. 5800x3300 isn't 4x 1080p, in fact I'm not even sure how you got those dimensions. I thought you may have just multiplied 1920 and 1080 by 4, but that still doesn't add up... lol. But in any case, 5800x3300 (19 megapixels!) is much more then 4x the current HD standard. 4x 1080p would be somewhere around 3840x2160, or around 8.3 megapixels. I guess the fact that no one caught this before me isn't really a good sign...
 

claec

Distinguished
Mar 30, 2009
92
0
18,640
Best answers
2
[citation][nom]woffle[/nom]"Intel expects the new tech to help propel the successors of 1080p into consumer living rooms. As it stands now, image resolutions are slated to quadruple by the middle of the year"Which tv's are going to have a resolution of ~5800x3300 by mid of the year?[/citation]

1920x1080 = 2073600 pixels = 2.07 megapixels

2073600x4 = 8294400 pixels = 8.29 megapixels

Therefor, a new TV with 4000x2100 resolution = 8.4 megapixels, this is equivalent to 4x resolution increase.

5800x3300 = 19140000 pixels = 19.14 megapixels = nearly 10x increase.

Considering that Panasonic has a few TVs at 4000x2000, I think quadrupling 1080p is a viable option sometime this year.
 

claec

Distinguished
Mar 30, 2009
92
0
18,640
Best answers
2
[citation][nom]dragonsqrrl[/nom]Dude, check your math. 5800x3300 isn't 4x 1080p, in fact I'm not even sure how you got those dimensions. I thought you may have just multiplied 1920 and 1080 by 4, but that still doesn't add up... lol. But in any case, 5800x3300 (19 megapixels!) is much more then 4x the current HD standard. 4x 1080p would be somewhere around 3840x2160, or around 8.3 megapixels. I guess the fact that no one caught this before me isn't really a good sign...[/citation]

And ah heck, I'm beat by a minute...
 

dragonsqrrl

Distinguished
Nov 19, 2009
1,280
0
19,290
Best answers
3
[citation][nom]TheMysticWizard[/nom]Oh great, all those people who bought all the thunderbolt hardware are going to have to upgrade to this new technology or be left behind.Oh, wait... No one bought into the thunderbolt technology to begin with...[/citation]
... it literally just became commercially available, and Apple has already adopted it for their Mac Pro lineup. Don't you think it's just a bit early to cry fail?
 

shoelessinsight

Distinguished
Jun 27, 2009
92
0
18,630
Best answers
0
Quadruple resolutions more likely refers to doubling both the vertical and horizontal resolutions of current televisions, which results in four times as many total pixels. So we'd be looking at 3840x2160, not that far off from the 2560x1600 monitors and televisions that already exist.

But then again, how many people own a 2560x1600 monitor? They've been around for several years, but are too expensive for most people to consider. Any new television format is probably going to require nearly another decade for substantial adoption.

Faster connections are always welcome, however, and people will inevitably find a use for the extra bandwidth. As long as it doesn't cost an arm and a leg, I say the sky's the limit.

Edit: These comments move fast! Guess others beat me to the punch on the quadruple resolution topic.
 

palladin9479

Distinguished
Moderator
Jul 26, 2008
3,239
0
20,860
Best answers
45
I'm more concerned about it being "Intel" branded. Make it an open standard so anyone can use it inside their products and It'll catch on, lock it down with complicated and restricted licensing models and it won't catch. For all we know Intel will only allow it to be put on "Intel" chipped PC's and thus attempt to lock out competition. If they allow anyone to equip their system with it, then my dream of an interconnected house with a mainframe style computer might be reality soon.
 

chickenhoagie

Distinguished
Feb 12, 2010
517
0
18,980
Best answers
0
[citation][nom]dark_lord69[/nom]They are talking about short distances like in your home... That's all fine and dandy but ISP's can't go anywhere near that speed.My ISP Connection:6 mbpsThis Technology:50,000 mbpsI guess I just fail to see the need for this technology.OK, so you've got a new 4320p HDTV I don't think blue ray can do more than 1080p so a new player would need to be released and perhaps you could connect a PC or tablet to a computer for an insanely HD picture but as I said.. I fail to see a need for it and for TV's that are even HIGHER definition. I'm fine with my 1080p.[/citation]
While you have a good point as far as the need for a higher definiton is concerned..(its true the human eye can only see such high video quality to a certain point before it all looks the same), the need for faster internet speeds is DEFINITELY needed. 50gbps silicon photonics could definitely increase bandwidth in the U.S., seeing one of the big problems as to why the U.S. standards for internet speed is so low is because fiber optic lines are expensive to make. Cheap alternatives like this will make things much easier to access and although 100m isn't very far, even the use of repeaters could still render these cables to be very fast; and im sure over time the maximum distance for the cables will lengthen out.
 

jprahman

Distinguished
May 17, 2010
775
0
19,060
Best answers
42
Isn't this what Thunderbolt (Light Peak) was supposed to be? I mean everybody was always talking about how Thunderbolt would be fiber optic and silicon photonics based and now we'll have to wait until 2015 to get what Thunderbolt was supposed to be. With that said it's not a big deal, because HDMI and DVI can still handle 1080p just fine, and Display Port handles 2500x1600 just fine as is, so it's not like we are in dire need of more bandwidth currently.
 

palladin9479

Distinguished
Moderator
Jul 26, 2008
3,239
0
20,860
Best answers
45
Light can cross galaxy's and maintain it's original form (more or less). Crossing a few hundred miles isn't hard to do. Single mode fiber has no known maximum length, neither do the transceivers attached to the fiber. You could just as easily make this work at 100 miles are you could at 10 feet. That being said, the fiber must be of a high enough quality that it doesn't introduce errors. It they try to use multi-mode fiber for this then you'll get vastly limited length.

In short, if they can develop an optic capable of sending / receiving at 50Gbps, then it can send / receive at 10, 100, 1000, or 100,000 feet.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS