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News Intel's Mark 'Bot' Subotnick: I'm Not 'Quaking in My Shoes' About Stadia

Phaaze88

Illustrious
Ambassador
Game streaming looks good in theory, the problem lies in the execution, the primary one being the ISPs.
Many, or most consumers, at least over here in the US, will not see a smooth experience with Stadia's service, unless internet plans are upgraded and made more affordable.
And if one has a decent to high end hardware setup already, moving to this streaming service would be a performance downgrade.
Plus - and this is likely a bigger issue than the ISPs - it's a digital service in which the consumer owns NONE of the products purchased. So should anything happen that causes said service to drop out, the users are left with NOTHING... save for a nice-sized hole in their bank accounts(the service isn't cheap).
 
Last edited:
Jun 27, 2019
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Until Intel releases Specialized AI CPUs that can make the Ethernet socket obsolete using another port. Cable lines are not that great vs LiFi tech or even intel made 10g cards soon for high end gaming at 4k in theory.
 

bit_user

Splendid
Ambassador
Game streaming looks good in theory, the problem lies in the execution, the primary one being the ISPs.
Many, or most consumers, at least over here in the US, will not see a smooth experience with Stadia's service, unless internet plans are upgraded and made more affordable.
They're not offering it in all markets. It will be slowly rolled out - probably based on factors like ISP quality. Who knows if it'll ever be available to people with poor internet connectivity...

The other thing is that they're co-locating their servers with ISPs, the same way as the content distribution networks do. That goes a long ways towards cutting down on latency and minimizing dependence on ISPs' uplink capacity.

the users are left with NOTHING... save for a nice-sized hole in their bank accounts(the service isn't cheap).
The initial cost is just for a pair of controllers and a chrome cast device. I think that includes like 3 months of service, and the whole lot is much cheaper than any console. So, if you try it and find your connectivity is too poor, then you're not out that much money. Plus, you could probably ebay your controllers and/or chrome cast.
 

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