News Intel's Tiger Lake Growls: 10nm Chip Packs 50 Percent More L3 Cache and AVX-512

redgarl

Distinguished
What an intimidating picture... only Toms can really be bullish on 4 cores and making it sounds like it really matter today...

Here is your EPYC thumbnail from the underdog then...

 

jimmysmitty

Champion
Moderator
What an intimidating picture... only Toms can really be bullish on 4 cores and making it sounds like it really matter today...

Here is your EPYC thumbnail from the underdog then...

Right because AMD has how many cores in the low power TDP mobile market? Whats that? They only have quad cores currently in all of mobile markets? The top Ryzen mobile chip right now is the 3750H with, you guessed it, 4 cores and 8 thread but a base clock of only 2.3GHz at 35W.

Its almost like this is geared towards a more specific market where they don't need 16 cores with SMT.......
 
Aug 29, 2019
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Quad core and hyperthreaded?!!!

Golly! :)

That's so....2007!

You do realized that these are low power mobile chips and not desktop chips.
But I would expect they have at least 6 core in mobile chips planned. Likely 8 or higher in higher watt mobile chips.
 

Giroro

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Jan 22, 2015
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I'm getting so totally confused by all the various non-descript Intel -mont -lake -cove code names. It's all starting to blur together, especially when there's rumors and leaks about hypothetical products 2+ years away built on follow-ups to technology Intel still really hasn't proven themselves capable of delivering.

So Tiger lake is supposed to be, what, Some kind of 10-series laptop processor that is set to come out in mid-to-late 2020 until Intel delays it again? Based on the number of cores and frequency, it's supposed to be somewhere above an atom and below an i5... so in the pentium/celeron/ i3 range?

At this point I'm just like, I'll figure out what 10 series processors actually matter sometime after they start showing up on the market, whenever that is - but this isn't looking like a particularly promising launch.
 
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Giroro

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What applications beside some 3d graphic application need that many threads
File Compression, Media encoding, multitasking... of course I'm not a big fan of the "number of threads" metric, because HT/SMT threads don't add nearly as much as adding a core - and you definately start seeing deminishing returns since, yes, there's not a lot of software that can take advantage of over 8 threads. That is why 8C/8T 9th gen i7s outperform the 12 Thread 6C/12T 8th gen.
 
Aug 29, 2019
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I'm getting so totally confused by all the various non-descript Intel -mont -lake -cove code names. It's all starting to blur together, especially when there's rumors and leaks about hypothetical products 2+ years away built on follow-ups to technology Intel still really hasn't proven themselves capable of delivering.

So Tiger lake is supposed to be, what, Some kind of 10-series laptop processor that is set to come out in mid-to-late 2020 until Intel delays it again? Based on the number of cores and frequency, it's supposed to be somewhere above an atom and below an i5... so in the pentium/celeron/ i3 range?

At this point I'm just like, I'll figure out what 10 series processors actually matter sometime after they start showing up on the market, whenever that is - but this isn't looking like a particularly promising launch.

It is very important to realize these for mobile chips and will likely i5 and higher performance wise. Also since the chips have more cache and Xe graphics they will be 11 or higher series. The level you are referring to likely Lakefield class of processors with hybrid single Sunny Core with 4 new Tremont Atom. Keep in mind Tiger Lake as AVX-512 which is similar to what is on Xeons now


Also if you closely at benchmark article included in the article - it compare the Y version - you know what Intel use to Core-M and compare it competition

"Tiger Lake processor is allegedly up to 24% and 26% faster than the AMD Ryzen 7 3750H quad-core CPU in the single-core and quad-core tests, respectively"
 
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bit_user

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Quad core and hyperthreaded?!!!

Golly! :)

That's so....2007!
The Nehalem (the first-gen of the i# naming) i7 was the first to bring this combination to the desktop. It debuted in November of 2008. So, at least you were close.

You do realized that these are low power mobile chips and not desktop chips.
This combination existed in mobile, as far back as Q3 2009:

https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/43122/intel-core-i7-720qm-processor-6m-cache-1-60-ghz.html

The main difference being that was a 45 W CPU, while this Tiger Lake is a U-series, which should be more like 15 W (give or take).
 
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bit_user

Splendid
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It is very important to realize these for mobile chips and will likely i5 and higher performance wise. Also since the chips have more cache and Xe graphics they will be 11 or higher series. The level you are referring to likely Lakefield class of processors with hybrid single Sunny Core with 4 new Tremont Atom. Keep in mind Tiger Lake as AVX-512 which is similar to what is on Xeons now
sigh

The i# tells you where the process sits, within a tier, but doesn't tell you what tier it's in. I would hope forum regulars picked up on that, by now, but I know some people don't pay much attention to mobile. If you want to know what tier it's in, look at the series: Y, U, or H (the segment which used to be QM).

This is a U-series, meaning it's mainstream mobile. In the next couple years, that's going to be 10 nm, which have better power efficiency but generally worse performance than 14 nm (hence, why we just saw Comet Lake launch into mobile @ 14 nm).

Whenever there's a juicy roadmap leak, that's something you might want to bookmark: https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-roadmap-10nm-14nm-gpu-cpu,39163.html



One note about that: it's for commercial laptops (read: business), so the dates will lag the offering of those CPUs for consumers. However, the names, tiers, and technologies shouldn't change.

The inclusion of AVX-512 is just a standard trickle-down of high-end features into the mainstream. I think it'll be of limited usefulness, but it's mainly aimed at AI/inferencing (which really belongs on a GPU or specialized hardware block, but that's a different discussion).

Also if you closely at benchmark article included in the article - it compare the Y version - you know what Intel use to Core-M and compare it competition
It was a different article about a different leak, relating to a different (Y-series) Tiger Lake CPU. The results are therefore of limited relevance, but what you omitted is that Y-series CPU's performance relative to a Coffee Lake U-series:
When pitched against the i7-8559U quad-core Coffee Lake processor, the Tiger Lake Y chip seemingly performs just 4%, 2% and 8% slower in single-core, quad-core and multi-core workloads, respectively.
Here's the specs on that i7 U-series (also 4C/8T; 20 - 28 W):

https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/137979/intel-core-i7-8559u-processor-8m-cache-up-to-4-50-ghz.html


However, the caveat is that the benchmark used is probably not the best CPU metric. I'm not familiar with UserBenchmark, but it sounds to me like one of those "user experience" benchmarks that are heavily influenced by more aspects of the system, such as GPU and storage. And we don't know what sort of system that i7-8559U was in, but it was likely a desktop mini system that could've had a SATA SSD (or slower NVMe). So, I really wouldn't pay much attention to it.
 
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