Introducing HoloLamp: Portable, Projector-Based, Glasses-Free Augmented Reality

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dusty13

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this is not AR this is a simple projector. nothing 3d about it and nothing AR about it either except for a bit of marketing blabber to sell a small desk-projector as much higher prices than this hardware type would warrant.
 

Crystalizer

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It's even better if it's just a 1 or 2 projectors and the ar is mainly generated with software. That means this could become very cheap for all of us.
 

MASOUTH

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Gotta love people that just blabber nonsense without even reading or looking into something.

1) AR does not mean 3D or a hologram. It is merely a computer generated sensory input on the real world. This generates visual images into the real world. Criteria met.

2) the projector tracks your viewing angle and changes the projection accordingly so that you are viewing the correct side of the object from that view point. That would be 3D, to say otherwise would be to say that we STILL have not created 3D effects on the computer or movie screen because they are "only flat surfaces". Criteria 2 met.

3) "The HoloLamp renders the projected image in such a way that it tricks your brain into perceiving a holographic image when you’re really looking at a flat projected image.". Marketing blabber? Sounds like a pretty straight forward description of what they are selling.
 

Crystalizer

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Augmented reality. To augment reality. Yeah I got that part and what comes to that it tricks your brain. It does need a really good algorithm to bend the image in the projection so that it can do the job. If implementing such algorithm would be so easy pokemon go would have had better augmentations too. My thoughts where: Are you mostly just buying for the software, if it's made out of pico projector?
 

MASOUTH

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Not sure why you quoted me, I wasn't addressing your comment but Dusty and their whole "I didn't really understand/ read the article and haven't looked any further into this but I'm just going to assume that I know what I am talking about and blabber away"
 

bit_user

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First, there are surely limits to how much depth they can simulate, before you notice it's not really 3D.

Second, they use multiple cameras to scan the surface and estimate its depth. In this regard, you cannot compare it to Pokemon go, since the latter runs on mainstream phones which have only one back-facing camera.

Third, it uses face tracking, which I'll bet Pokemon Go is also lacking.

It's not just a projector. It contains several cameras, which are needed to achieve the effect. This makes all the difference.

I'm thought these points were all pretty clear, from the article.

If this were inexpensive enough, I think it could find quite a few niches. I particularly like the AR for toys example, but both that and the educational applications will be severely hampered by its single-viewer restriction. Otherwise, if it could be made cheaply enough, perhaps some big toy company would buy them.
 
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