ioSafe Jolts Thunderbolt SSD RAID With 1,000,000 Volts

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Xatos

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Cool video, but as for the SSD, the charge via perception is clearly behind the SSD (his suit/hand). Whatever, doesn't really matter anyway.
 

nebun

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ok the volt rating is not what damages electronics it's the AMPS....if this thing is so good at protecting data then why is it that insurance for your data is only $1000....i guess it's not that safe after all....such a stupid gimmick
 

freggo

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Remember science class ?
It's not the Volts that kill you, it's the Amps !
Goes to show you, the Italians are cool but the French will do you in :)


 
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The power supply also needs high enough voltage potential to cause breakdown of skin into the conductive region so that electrons (current) will flow. So you are half way correct. The voltage potential needs to be about 50 volts on dry skin AND the power supply needs to be able to provide the current needed to stop the heart.
 
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Just so everybody gets it. Statics electric discharge has almost no current and a lot of electricity potential. That fries electronic if they are hit with it. This is why workers in electronic manufacturing are wearing heels and wrist dichage device and they hookup the wrist to ground when they are sitting at their work station. Because in that case, the heels dischage device isn't working (not enough pressure on the ground). The wrist band also contains a high ohmage resistor, so workers don't get killed if they touch a place where current is high. Volt = Resistance * I (Amps), the higher the resistance, the lower the current is. There's also the lab caot, which contains a carbon fiber strand that forms a faraday cage to prevent static electricity of coming out your clothes.

So yeah, that demo is valid and the drive is tough.
 

joex444

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I'm thinking this is more of a demonstration that it can handle things like surges. Supposing that a sudden spike in your line caused a surge and your PSU ended up dumping something like 60V into it right before the PSU's capacitors themselves blew up. Worst case scenario, who knows what that voltage would be. But short of your house itself getting hit by lightning it's going to be under 1MV.

In electronics, too much current is basically the source of death. However, electric circuits have a fixed resistance. Too much voltage is then exactly the cause of too much current, unless you have a fuse. So, asking for 1MA or asking for a high current test is basically asking for an overvoltage test. Think about what happens when you overvolt your CPU. If it's the current that kills you and somehow these aren't related, then your CPU should run fine at 12V -- if you could cool it. But it doesn't, does it? Think about when we had 3.5" floppy drives and you plugged the connector on backwards. You reversed the 5 and 3.3V lines, right? And then that magical blue smoke came out and it no longer worked...
 

warmon6

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[citation][nom]nebun[/nom]ok the volt rating is not what damages electronics it's the AMPS....if this thing is so good at protecting data then why is it that insurance for your data is only $1000....i guess it's not that safe after all....such a stupid gimmick[/citation]

And yet static electricity that we can hold (only about 20k to 25k volts with very little amps) can fry electronics. Im sure that coil is packing more punch than that...... Just saying......
 

interestingisit

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OK.. This trick is getting lame... and it's just that.. a trick. Put anything in a conductive cage so the current passes around it, and it will come out unscathed... Just like the dude holding it!! If a person can handle it, so can any electronic device...... zzzZZZZ
 

jamie_1318

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Second the lame part, if you knew that electricity was coming it is WAY to easy to prevent ANY amount of electricity from damaging it with a conductive cage+ground.
 

tbq

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From my experience with experienced data recovery services where physical damage was done to a drive, $1000 doesn't go very far at all.
 

SoiledBottom

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As others have said its the amps that do the real damage not the volts.

True Story, I served on the Coast guard cutter Diligence and worked in the galley as a cook.
I was cleaning a flat to grill for an inspection and my right hand pointer finger touched a live wire.

When being electrocuted your muscles flex, so with both hands grabbing the flat top grill I took a 440 or 480 3 phase voltage I don't remember the exact voltage..but a 50 amp breaker tripped which saved my life.

I ended up with third degree burns on both my hands. MY left hand had a hole the size of a nickle in it. My crew mates called me sparky for the rest of my tour on that ship.

Not sure what my point is but I'm pretty sure there was some data loss in my brains hard drive.

Remember kids its the Amps and not the volts
 
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YOU NEED THE VOLTAGE POTENTIAL IN ORDER FOR HIGH CURRENT TO FLOW THROUGH YOUR BODY, PERIOD. I cannot believe how ignorant you people are. Especially, SoiledBottom. Soiledbottom, if you grabbed a 1 volt battery that had 1000 amp hours then IT WILL NOT KILL YOU. The voltage potential is too low to put the skin into the breakdown region to where the deadly current will flow. Now take a 48 volt battery that has high current output ability and then it will kill you.

So folks remember you need the voltage potential to put the skin into the conduction region and you need to be sure the supply can provide the current needed to kill. In other words YOU NEED BOTH to kill you. If any of you wish to doubt me then I will wager $100 dollars against all of you that my car battery will not kill me. I will grab both terminals just to prove my point. If you do not know about electronics then you people cannot comment on such areas that are not your expertise. Stick with what you know.
 

SoiledBottom

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Dennis Reece

"I cannot believe how ignorant you people are. Especially, SoiledBottom."

"Soiledbottom, if you grabbed a 1 volt battery that had 1000 amp hours then IT WILL NOT KILL YOU. The voltage potential is too low to put the skin into the breakdown region to where the deadly current will flow. Now take a 48 volt battery that has high current output ability and then it will kill you."

Listen no need to name call "Ignorant"...I am no electrician, as I said I was a cook on a Coast Guard Cutter that took third degree burns on both my hands when my right pointer finger touched a live wire and the current exited from my left hand which left a hole the size of a nickle. The Flat to grill was either 440 or 480 3 phase and a 50 amp breaker tripped releasing my grasp of the flat top grill....to this very day I am treated at the Veterans hospital in Hickory N.C. for nerve damage and muscle damage.

I have told I am very lucky to have survived.

So Dennis Reece...Go Phuck yourself


Respectfully

Soiled :)


 

mortsmi7

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It didn't even look like it arced to the drive, but through his gloves instead. I'd have to say that no electricity whatsoever actually passed through the drive, it wasn't the path of least resistance.
 

mortsmi7

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[citation][nom]DennisReece[/nom] If you do not know about electronics then you people cannot comment on such areas that are not your expertise. Stick with what you know.[/citation]
Can you stop commenting since we're talking about basic electrical and not electronics?

Actually, a 48v battery probably wouldn't kill you since it's a direct current. Alternating currents are the dangerous ones as they can change the heart rhythm, which is why shock victims are closely monitored for a while after.
 

freggo

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[citation][nom]DennisReece[/nom]YOU NEED THE VOLTAGE POTENTIAL IN ORDER FOR HIGH CURRENT TO FLOW THROUGH YOUR BODY, PERIOD. I cannot believe how ignorant you people are. Especially, SoiledBottom. Soiledbottom, if you grabbed a 1 volt battery that had 1000 amp hours then IT WILL NOT KILL YOU. The voltage potential is too low to put the skin into the breakdown region to where the deadly current will flow. Now take a 48 volt battery that has high current output ability and then it will kill you. So folks remember you need the voltage potential to put the skin into the conduction region and you need to be sure the supply can provide the current needed to kill. In other words YOU NEED BOTH to kill you. If any of you wish to doubt me then I will wager $100 dollars against all of you that my car battery will not kill me. I will grab both terminals just to prove my point. If you do not know about electronics then you people cannot comment on such areas that are not your expertise. Stick with what you know.[/citation]

"1000 amp hours" ?
Now you are mixing things up a bit :)

 
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