Question Is 180 Watt PSU enough?

Will my PSU over heat?

  • Yes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Your PSU is the least of your worries.

    Votes: 2 100.0%

  • Total voters
    2
  • Poll closed .
Mar 18, 2020
4
0
10
0
I’m trying to make a three monitor display. Two being 43” 4K LED TVs and one 24” 1080 monitor.

I’m NOT gaming. I’m a dentist and I’m trying to show Xrays at the highest resolution on the two TVs when patients are sitting or laying down (so not simultaneously). My current GPU is integrated Intel UHD Graphics 630. Processor is i5 9400 and storage 256SSD running win 10. I feel I should also make it know that the practice management software is cloud based not on my CPU. Also, as far as streaming I plan on using the WiFi from the actually TVs to prevent overuse of the GPU and potential overheating of the PSU.

My plan was to install the MSI Graphic Cards GT 1030 2G LP OC which has a max draw of 30 watts and recommends a 300watt PSU. Also, I was going to upgrade RAM from 8gb to 16gb. The 24” monitor was going to be connected to the integrated GPU via VGA while I was going to use only the HDMI port of the discrete GPU for the two 4K TVs. A 4K 60Hz HDMI 2.0 Extender with Loop out over Cat6 Cable would basically create extended monitors to the 24” but the two 4Ks would mirror each other. Which is fine.

My ultimate question is, will my PSU overheat with what I plan to do? And do you think upgrading RAM is necessary?

Thanks!
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
The 30 watt value (max draw) for the GPU was very likely established under ideal circumstances and those circumstances are not likely "real world" nor applicable to your requirements.

If the GPU manufacturer recommends a 300 watt PSU that is what you must (at a minimum) use. Otherwise the GPU manufacturer could blame any problems on the proposed 180 watt PSU.

However 300 watts is unlikely to be enough for most current systems. Add up the wattages for all installed components. If a wattage range is provided use the high end value. Use 300 watts for the PSU.

Once totaled add 25% more. The resulting wattage is more likely what will be needed to support the three display system.

The PSU is a critical system component. So budget/plan accordingly.

As for RAM 16GB would be a good choice. Just check the motherboard's User Guide/Manual for supported RAM modules and configurations.

You will need and want matched RAM kit (2 x 8GB) that would be configured for dual channel use per the motherboard's User Guide.

Always good to visit the motherboard manufacturer's website for more information and details. Doing so is often cited in the User Guide. Details matter.

And the GPU will still need to be doing the video processing - does not matter how the resulting image product is provided to the destination monitors.

I suggest just hardwired video connections - wireless adds complications.
 
Mar 18, 2020
4
0
10
0
The 30 watt value (max draw) for the GPU was very likely established under ideal circumstances and those circumstances are not likely "real world" nor applicable to your requirements.

If the GPU manufacturer recommends a 300 watt PSU that is what you must (at a minimum) use. Otherwise the GPU manufacturer could blame any problems on the proposed 180 watt PSU.

However 300 watts is unlikely to be enough for most current systems. Add up the wattages for all installed components. If a wattage range is provided use the high end value. Use 300 watts for the PSU.

Once totaled add 25% more. The resulting wattage is more likely what will be needed to support the three display system.

The PSU is a critical system component. So budget/plan accordingly.

As for RAM 16GB would be a good choice. Just check the motherboard's User Guide/Manual for supported RAM modules and configurations.

You will need and want matched RAM kit (2 x 8GB) that would be configured for dual channel use per the motherboard's User Guide.

Always good to visit the motherboard manufacturer's website for more information and details. Doing so is often cited in the User Guide. Details matter.

And the GPU will still need to be doing the video processing - does not matter how the resulting image product is provided to the destination monitors.

I suggest just hardwired video connections - wireless adds complications.
I bought a Lenovo m720e which has a 180watt PSU. I’ve learned I can’t sub it out. I guess my assumption of not drawing a lot of power with my very limited application of showing high res pictures is incorrect?
Also, regarding the video processing, how would the GPU come into play if I switch the input on the TV itself, so it’s no longer a display for the computer? These are WiFi Smart TVs so it would be getting video from WiFi not the computer.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
For three monitors you need three display ports. But you could use two ports and just split one of them to serve the two 43" monitors.

If I looked at the correct technical specs the Lenovo has one Display Port, one VGA port, and two slots (PCIe x1, PCIex16) for the GPU.

Lenovo reference link:

https://www.lenovo.com/us/en/desktops-and-all-in-ones/thinkcentre/m-series-sff/ThinkCentre-M720e/p/11BDS04100

GPU:

https://www.notebookcheck.net/Intel-UHD-Graphics-630-GPU-Benchmarks-and-Specs.257928.0.html

Reading back if the x-rays are basically static images then the GPU is/will not be doing a whole lot of high end processing as it would were games etc. being played.

Not sure about the MSI Graphic Cards GT 1030 2G LP OC , it would go in the PCIe x16 slot. But I have lost track of the connections thereafter.

Could you provide a simple sketch of the devices and connections you are considering?

What I understand is:

Lenovo m720 [LAN Port]--- ethernet cable ---> Router ~~~ wireless~~~ >two wireless 43" 4k LED Smart TVs

[VGA port] ----VGA to HDMI cable ----> 24" 1080 Monitor

[GT 1030 port] -----> ?

Sending the x-ray image to two separate wireless TV's may be a bit problematic.

Chromecast may be necessary.

We may need to move this thread to Displays versus PSU. Display is more applicable I think and additional insight is needed.
 
Mar 18, 2020
4
0
10
0
The GT 1030 from what I learned in the Lenovo forums will fit. My concern is the PSU limit of 180 watts.

Again the GT 1030 has a max draw of 30 watts

The set will be as follows:

i would omit the Intel 630 altogether which draws a max of 15 watts. So if it’s not in use I have a spare 15 watts, no?

MSI GT 1030 has one DP and one HDMI port.

Display port —> DP/HDMI converter-> HDMI cable —> 24” monitor

HDMI port—> HDMI cable—> HDMI 2.0 extender Balun transmitter (basically a splitter) which has two ports, (a) CAT 6 and (b)HDMI:

(a) Cat 6 port—> Cat 6 cable—> HDMI 2.0 extender Balun receiver—> HDMI port—> HDMI cable —> 4K TV 43”

(b) HDMI port—>HDMI cable—> 4K TV 43”

I tried miracast and it wasn’t reliable enough for me. I’ve got it working without the GT 1030 but only at 1080p, I’d really like to take advantage of the 4K picture quality.
 
Last edited:

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS