[SOLVED] Is a 430 watt power supply enough for a GTX 750 Ti?

Jul 19, 2022
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I have a psu of 430 watts i have a gtx 750 ti and i7 870 with one ssd of 119gb and one hdd of 250 gb with gtx 750 ti i want to know that this psu can
Here is the psu:-https://www.ebay.com/itm/255146948554?epid=165315548&hash=item3b67f177ca:g:ZtkAAOSwegxhQlNU&amdata=enc%3AAQAHAAAA0DzmJ1ingIIKtTLbFAWroVvYVMCnLG48NcX89k4kjaaL8DGBIf%2FQ5Q%2FsXNxPnDaix9eIkAiOHMvFaqNnwdvHTPb9EJwCxwYvMVXwehb1tAWUMpqQckBUUfjRtPI%2F3HtogFF2baEOwlA80E5XAUar7Fv3uIEGVXcJZHDFOSOsv34SFq9k88LjBFM%2B2j4PEkL7kxLmzne2yLbjoW05%2Ba1tTVyIYxO1Y3l281JbN5H76U88iRXtoZnjYMNaogLZ6UBcqpukIGNnD%2FXwGWSljic4TFw%3D%7Ctkp%3ABFBMjoC678Jg
 
You can buy that PSU for 40 dollars new on Amazon.

The video card is quite low powered; well under 100 watts.

I suspect most here would frown at the PSU due to build quality alone......regardless of its watt rating.
 

punkncat

Distinguished
Ambassador
The i7 you have only draws a bit less than 90W on load. That GPU ~75 (maybe). With the balance of your listed parts I doubt you are pulling all of 200W. I would feel safe using a 'low tier' PSU with that kind of output for a system like this. At this point, even if you break something finding replacement items with even more capability would be very inexpensive.
 
I would recommend getting a new, better quality PSU. Those 430w Thermaltake units were poor quality. You are really risking your whole system frying, when that thing dies.
I wouldn't bother, given these components. While that might be reasonable advice for protecting newer, more expensive hardware, a "good quality" PSU would likely cost more than a 750 Ti and an i7-870 combined at this point. : P
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
A good quality PSU would cost more. But a better PSU wouldn't; there's a huge gulf between this PSU and a good one. This is one of those really old TR2s back from when TR2s were really awful. To get a sad 216W of +12V on a 430W PSU, it had to be rated at 25 degrees.

This is probably a minimum of a decade old -- and likely 15 years or more. The box has a 2005 copyright date and it brags about the "new" 24-pin connector (introduced in 2003), no active power factor correction, and only has two SATA cables. This is so far below the level of basic safety, I just wouldn't feel safe leaving my home with the PC on, no matter the hardware. You couldn't pay me $55 to use this, let alone me actually shelling out that amount for it.

PSUs that are simply mediocre are practically designed for applications like this.

PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: Corsair VS600 (2020) 600 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($39.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $39.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-07-19 17:19 EDT-0400


PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: EVGA BR 600 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($44.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $44.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-07-19 17:23 EDT-0400


PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: Thermaltake Smart BX1 550 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($39.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $39.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-07-19 17:29 EDT-0400


I would call any of these "good" PSUs, and I wouldn't buy them to run anything I personally own more powerful than an egg salad sandwich, but I'd put any of these in a PC before the one linked. The old, old TR2 is the type of PSU you would airdrop into a country you're at war with in the hope that they use them in key military and government computer systems.
 
Jul 19, 2022
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so what should i do???????
i dont want to replace it bec i was having a psu of 350 watts and it overloaded adn display was gone
so i bought this psu
tell me simple answer yes or no
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
I wouldn't bother, given these components. While that might be reasonable advice for protecting newer, more expensive hardware, a "good quality" PSU would likely cost more than a 750 Ti and an i7-870 combined at this point. : P
If someone is buying a 15-year-old junk PSU, I'd wager that the cost of replacing a 750 Ti/i7-870 would be prohibitive.

My first car was a 1988 Ford Tempo that was always on the edge of falling apart. Absolute junk, but I still changed the oil, because I needed that junk to work.
 
If someone is buying a 15-year-old junk PSU, I'd wager that the cost of replacing a 750 Ti/i7-870 would be prohibitive.
It sounds like they have the PSU already. I suppose I don't see the problem with running a mediocre older PSU with older, low-power hardware. If buying a new graphics card or CPU happened to be cost-prohibitive in the relatively unlikely event that the PSU were to fail and damage hardware, then I don't see how spending a similar amount to replace a presumably working PSU that they already own would be any less cost-prohibitive. There are plenty of old, even lower-end power supplies that still work fine enough after decades of use. And there's no guarantee how long the other hardware will hold out either way. For all we know, the issue with their "display going blank" may not even be related to their prior PSU.

If they didn't have the PSU yet, then sure, it might be worth looking for something a little better, but since it sounds like they have it already, they might as well try it and see if it fixes their issue. If it doesn't, then something else entirely unrelated to the PSU may be wrong with their system.

So I disagree that the answer would be an "obvious no". Their question was whether the PSU would work with a 750 Ti in their system, and assuming all the hardware is functional, it most likely would.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
It sounds like they have the PSU already. I suppose I don't see the problem with running a mediocre older PSU with older, low-power hardware.
Mediocre would be unbelievably kind. This is unbelievable garbage. I linked actual mediocre PSUs.

If buying a new graphics card or CPU happened to be cost-prohibitive in the relatively unlikely event that the PSU were to fail and damage hardware, then I don't see how spending a similar amount to replace a presumably working PSU that they already own would be any less cost-prohibitive.
I'm not suggesting he gets a Platinum-rated 1000W PSU. I'm suggesting cheap, mediocre PSUs.

There are plenty of old, even lower-end power supplies that still work fine enough after decades of use. And there's no guarantee how long the other hardware will hold out either way. For all we know, the issue with their "display going blank" may not even be related to their prior PSU.
"Lower-end?" That's in the same category as "drain cleaner is one of the less desirable hamburger toppings." This is dangerous trash.

If they didn't have the PSU yet, then sure, it might be worth looking for something a little better, but since it sounds like they have it already, they might as well try it and see if it fixes their issue. If it doesn't, then something else entirely unrelated to the PSU may be wrong with their system.
If it starts up, then he's still using garbage. This isn't like suggesting someone with a 10900K switch platforms to a comparable performing Ryzen. It doesn't matter whether this PSU costs $0 or $40 or $1,000,000. The money spent on this PSU is already gone and wasted. It's not part of the equation; it's the sunk cost fallacy in practice.

This wasn't a mediocre PSU or a "low-end" PSU. This was a garbage PSU that could barely crank out 200W at 25 degrees,15 years ago. Are you offering to serve as insurance to the OP should he no longer have a working PC three minutes or three weeks after he pushes this in his PC? You can arrange that over DM, if so.
 
Reactions: TheWorkingNerd
I'm not suggesting he gets a Platinum-rated 1000W PSU. I'm suggesting cheap, mediocre PSUs.
I think you are overestimating how much a failed component in that system would cost to replace.

If it starts up, then he's still using garbage.
And if they buy yet another PSU without trying this one and system still doesn't start up due to the problem actually being something else entirely, they will have spent more on unused PSUs than what any other component in the system is likely worth.
 
Jul 21, 2022
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Chances are you'll want to upgrade parts down the road, so it's not as if buying a quality PSU will be a waste later on. It often gets overlooked, but you don't want to cheap out (not buy a 1200w 80+ platinum, just something reputable) since everything in the case is connected to the PSU in some way. Spend the extra money and you won't have to drop several hundred replacing fried components later.
 

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