Question Is a cmos jumper needed?

Apr 11, 2019
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Hey guys. So recently I got a new motherboard to upgrade my desktop computer with. Here’s a list of components:

Motherboard: ASUS TUF b450 plus gaming
CPU: AMD Ryzen 3 2200g
Graphics card: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti
Memory: 2x8GB Corsair Vengeance LPX

The power supply is 500W, I managed to assemble all the components together and connect them properly. Everything powers on when I press the power button, but it won’t display anything on the screen. I’ve been surfing the forums for troubleshooting methods and one of them was to reset cmos, which means I had to remove the motherboard’s battery, wait 1-5 minutes and then reinstall the battery. But after I did that nothing turns on, not the cpu the gpu or the fans. I did notice that motherboards have a cmos connector on it. Is a cmos jumper needed? I still need to setup bios for the first time but right now I can’t.
 
Removing the battery and use the CMOS jumper is the same thing. Both clear the CMOS. My guess is the battery is not installed properly. Go back and make sure it is facing the right way and seated properly in the slot.
Except just pulling the battery takes longer since the CMOS has to drain away, possibly up to an hour, and potentially leaves some locations in undefined states if not left long enough. Shorting the pins (by use of the jumper) is faster and more assuredly resets all locations. Doing BOTH is, of course, best.

Also, to OP: you can just short the pins with a screwdriver tip or something metallic, in case you're thinking a jumper is necessary.
 
Except just pulling the battery takes longer since the CMOS has to drain away, possibly up to an hour, and potentially leaves some locations in undefined states if not left long enough. Shorting the pins (by use of the jumper) is faster and more assuredly resets all locations. Doing BOTH is, of course, best.

Also, to OP: you can just short the pins with a screwdriver tip or something metallic, in case you're thinking a jumper is necessary.
I have never waited longer than 10 seconds by pulling the battery. But I am sure there are cases where it takes longer. Using the jumper is definitely easier (I use a fan header on the jumper) and it is they way I would go. But both do the same thing.
 
I think the PSU supplies a hold up voltage for the CMOS even when the PC is powered off, do you maybe need to switch off/unplug the PSU when you remove the battery to make sure power is actually removed? I always just use the jumper so I'm not sure.
 
Apr 11, 2019
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Thanks for all of your responses. One of you said something about shortening the pins with a screwdriver. I assume the PSU needs to be turned on in order for that to work?
 
Apr 11, 2019
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Thanks for all of your responses. One of you said something about shortening the pins with a screwdriver. I assume the PSU needs to be turned on in order for that to work?
Also wat I was asking earlier is, is a cmos jumper essential to booting the pc?
 
Apr 11, 2019
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I tried jumping the two pins as well as the battery using a screwdriver, but my computer still isn’t turning on. I do remember when I first removed the battery, I didn’t know there was a metal flap that, when pulled back, makes the battery come out. So the first time I removed it, I used a screwdriver on the other side of the flap and I managed to yank it out. Could it be that I damaged the battery and that it needs to be replaced?
 
I tried jumping the two pins as well as the battery using a screwdriver, but my computer still isn’t turning on. I do remember when I first removed the battery, I didn’t know there was a metal flap that, when pulled back, makes the battery come out. So the first time I removed it, I used a screwdriver on the other side of the flap and I managed to yank it out. Could it be that I damaged the battery and that it needs to be replaced?
either that or the holder

you should not need the battery in place to start the computer though. with the battery out it should start but with BIOS default settings, and any changes you make to BIOS settings won't be retained after a power-down as the CMOS memory requires the battery to work.
 
Apr 11, 2019
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Hey guys so I believe I finally found the solution to the problem. So when I used the screwdriver to remove the battery for the first time, I shorted the circuit. NEVER use metal on the motherboard or any of its components or else ur entire system will be damaged. Luckily for me though, the PSU I have has several levels of protection, including Short Circuit protection. That means that when I shorted the circuit, only the PSU is shut down, but everything else is okay. That’s why my computer won’t turn on at all. Thanks soo much for all ur help though!! I just ordered a new PSU. Remember, when u tried everything and still could not turn on ur pc, the PSU is the first to check, not the motherboard. More importantly, make sure ur PSU has power protection on it before u even think about shorting power for any reason.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Even IF you tripped the SC, OVP, OCP and UVP all at the same time, the psu will reset those protections seconds after you unplug it from the wall. But I'm guessing that you'll find that out when you get the new pc and the pc doesn't boot. If it does boot, and the psu was the issue, then it wasn't layers of protection that tripped, it was the psu that just died from a short circuit.

Sorry, but my guess would be the motherboard is toast.
 
Apr 11, 2019
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Even IF you tripped the SC, OVP, OCP and UVP all at the same time, the psu will reset those protections seconds after you unplug it from the wall. But I'm guessing that you'll find that out when you get the new pc and the pc doesn't boot. If it does boot, and the psu was the issue, then it wasn't layers of protection that tripped, it was the psu that just died from a short circuit.

Sorry, but my guess would be the motherboard is toast.
Wat I mean is it was the PSU that broke, but it’s because the PSU had protections that the motherboard is fine.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
And what I'm saying is that if it was the psu protections that tripped, the psu would be undamaged. Therefore if the psu is damaged, the damage caused the shutdown, not the protections tripping.

You shorted out the motherboard. Theres a couple thousand tiny components that power goes through before it gets back to the psu, including the cpu and cmos chip, since you shorted the battery posts.

The only way you'll know for sure is when you get the new psu.

I'm just saying don't hold your breath. After almost 40 years of playing around with hardware, both amateur and professional, I've not ever once seen anyone short out a motherboard and destroy a psu and do no damage to the mobo.
 
Apr 11, 2019
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Hey guys, so as it turns out I replaced my PSU and motherboard and the computer still won’t turn on. I kept using the chassis’s power button to test the computer. And I made sure the front panel connectors are properly connected. Now that power button is part of the chassis, and I’ve had the thing for many years. Could it be that my chassis had aged and I would need to get a replacement chassis?
 
Apr 11, 2019
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Okay so I followed the instructions. I turn on the PSU using its power switch. Then I tried turning on the computer with the screwdriver. It didn’t work. Not only that though, the chassis’s led was flashing on and off. It did that before upon using the chassis’s power button.
 
Apr 11, 2019
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Okay ignore the part where I said chassis led, I mean the motherboard rgb led light. It turns on, but all of its components don’t, and upon turning it on it flashes yellow. And that’s not even upon using the power switch, that happens when I turn on the PSU. Wat does flashing yellow mean? Could it be that the motherboard itself is working, but it just need time to fully receive power? I mean I just got this motherboard
 
How are you turning on the PSU while it's connected to the motherboard if not by using the motherboard power pins/power switch?

What LED? I don't see any mention of a debug LED on your motherboard in the manual or specifications.
 

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