Is adding a 120mm fan to the cryorig H7 worth it?

9third

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Mar 19, 2016
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The cryorig h7 comes with a 120mm fan that goes from 330-1600 rpm and 49 CFM. I wanted to get cryorigs "performance" 120mm fan which costs 20 us dollars and is rated at 600-2200 rpm and 83 cfm. Would buying this fan really impact performance or is it just better to stick with the included fan?
 
Id ask Cryorig when you call them to order the fan ... the fan doesn't necessarily spin faster because it can also suck air in from the sides of the cooler. Besides , let's say the fan was to die ... is your box any worse off than with the fan sitting on a drawer ? Your alternative is to toss it out or leave it sitting on a shelf.

How is this different from having X fans blowing into you case and Y fans blowing out ? How is this different that having X fans with inlet filter and X fans blowing out withiut ?

And you can set up the rpm of the fans with your MoBos speed control limiting the speed to a certain rpm.
 

9third

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Mar 19, 2016
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Then can I just use cryorigs performance fan as a push configuration? Or will it better to run two of the slower fans in a push-pull.
 

Ryan_78

Admirable
No it will not work for you if you buy that fan. Dual fan configure require 2 fans of the same CFM, static pressure, and speeds. You would have to get an identical fan, which can be found on cryorig site. Even then it's only at a maximum of 5C performance differences, usually only 2-3 degrees.
 
Push Pull generally increases air flow by 10-30% (21% average) ... and oddly enough, ytesting at martins liquid lab showed that having slightly different speeds / Sp actually impo0rved performance ... which was a result one wouldn't expect,

I have got assume that you bought the H7 because of a tight fit situation... are you sure you could mount a 2nd fan ?

From your original post, I thought you were talking about a fan swap. Here we see the following for the UT60:

1400 rpm gave 210 watts of cooling
1800 rpm gave 269 watts of cooling
2200 rpm gave 327 watts of cooling

Averaging the 1st to will give us an approximation at 1600 rpm, say 240 watts. At the 2200 rpm, we see a 35% improvement which will cost a significant boost in noise. However an air cooler behaves differently, I still would expect the boost to be about 25% or better.

If you can use push pull, that is... it does fit, I would not be concerned about the different speeds. Adding a fan, however, tends to have a lesser effect. Here we see temps drop from 52.75 w/ 1 fan to 51.75 w/ 2 fans to 50.75 w/ 3 fans

http://www.vortez.net/articles_pages/phanteks_ph_tc14pe_cpu_cooler_review,14.html

If you are looking for more performance, and are willing to settle for more noise, than the faster fan should get you some of that. As opposed to "throwing it away", I would put on the old fan (if it fits) and see how it works. Martin I think surprised us and his readers with his test results but there is no way to judge how wide this effect might be or what % of possible combinations would benefit. But again, it costs you nothing but time to see if you can realize the benefit that his test showed. Logic dictates to have the slower fan in push and the stronger fan in pull.

If you go this route, please post the results .. I musta had that silly puppy dog tilted head quizzical look on my face when I read Martins article and have been occasionally tossing it around in my head ever since.
 

9third

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Mar 19, 2016
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OK. That's A lot of info. I read that having a faster fan on one side and a slower fan on the other for push pull would make the slower fan go above the rpm it was designed for (because of the faster fan pulling more air then the slower fan) Would this damage the slower fan? (And can you summarize that post because that is a lot of info to take in :p)
 

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