Discussion Is AMD going to release another budget lineup?

Hi, so since AMD's 2017 launch of RX cards, i haven't seen any other release of their budget cards.
RX 560 4gb, RX 570 4gb/8gb, RX 580 4gb/8gb and RX 590 8gb were and still considered a really good 1080p budget option.
Are they expected to launch another budget lineup?
 

hotaru.hino

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possibly, something affordable
The RX 5500 XT is going "breaux, am I a joke to you?"

In all seriousness, it's probably too early to call it. There'll probably be a successor to the 5500 XT, but launching yet another product line in these times may not be the best idea. Or if they do, it'll probably be limited to system builders only (like there's an RX 5300/5300XT, but you won't find them at your local Microcenter)
 
possibly, something affordable
my prediction is AMD probably will not going to release something new in the sub $250 until 2022 time frame. they will keep the segment occupied by RX5300, RX5500 and RX5600 XT rather than making something new. RX5700XT debut at $400. now AMD put 6700XT at $480. the RX6600 sku most likely going to occupy $300-$400 price range. and 6500 probably will be 2022 product. AMD usually have the habit to keep their low end offering much longer before truly replacing them.
 
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hotaru.hino

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Just gives us a $250 or less GPU I don't even care anymore. We haven't had a "budget" GPU in ages
I don't know what your timeline of "ages" is, but the last generation has had <$250 video cards (most of the GeForce 16 lineup and the RX 5500/5500XT).

If we're talking about <$150 video cards, then sure. But I'm under the impression the demand in the DIY market isn't strong enough for either company to consider it a high priority.
 
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hotaru.hino

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Well they better since the lower end is where all the money sits.
In terms of actual money, most of that sits on the higher end. If we went with the Steam Hardware Survey for market share and used the launch MSRP, the RTX 2060 and GTX 1070 made more money than the GTX 1050 and GTX 1050 Ti combined despite the higher end cards accounting for half the market share of the lower end ones.

So while I'll take back the "strong enough" being not enough demand, I will still stand by my argument that as far as making money goes, the lower-end market isn't it. Considering both AMD and NVIDIA are publicly traded for-profit companies, the bottom line is better for them than volume. At least until volume hurts their bottom line.
 
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I don't know what your timeline of "ages" is, but the last generation has had <$250 video cards (most of the GeForce 16 lineup and the RX 5500/5500XT).

If we're talking about <$150 video cards, then sure. But I'm under the impression the demand in the DIY market isn't strong enough for either company to consider it a high priority.
maybe for AMD (even if they are majorly seen as CPU company) their top most priority actually goes to console. but for nvidia DIY probably their biggest market.
 
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PC have always about flexibility. choose the part base on your need and budget. this have also been one of the foundation of PC gaming. the thing with those "gaming" prebuilt they most often end up being more expensive than making your own.

also when i said DIY it doesn't mean everything must be built on DIY part. many of the home/office pc come with decent CPU but they only use iGPU or some super low end discrete GPU like GT720. nvidia create the likes of GTX750ti, 1050Ti and GTX1650 to serve this market.
 

hotaru.hino

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PC have always about flexibility. choose the part base on your need and budget. this have also been one of the foundation of PC gaming. the thing with those "gaming" prebuilt they most often end up being more expensive than making your own.
They also come with other benefits like warranty and support for the entire system. I'd wager most of the time people don't build their own PC is because they lack the knowledge and skill to be their own technical support. Yes, building a PC is stupid easy, but good luck if something goes wrong.

At the very least, you get a PC that you know works when you push the power button. And if it doesn't, you can send it back and get one that does.

also when i said DIY it doesn't mean everything must be built on DIY part. many of the home/office pc come with decent CPU but they only use iGPU or some super low end discrete GPU like GT720. nvidia create the likes of GTX750ti, 1050Ti and GTX1650 to serve this market.
No, I understand this part. However, again, I'm under no impression that the number of people who go this route is anywhere close to the number of people who buy a system that suits their needs and runs it to the ground before buying another. Mostly again, because they have to be their own tech support which they don't want to be.

But again, you're free to show me data that says otherwise.
 
hence i said "probably" in my earlier comment. going with more expensive prebuilt system does not guarantee the support will be able to solve your issue faster or immediately either. there are tons of systems builder out there that can help and advise people if they did not know to build their stuff from scratch. and they also offer after market service. but if you insist on seeing data JPR most likely have them. just pay their asking price for it.

https://www.jonpeddie.com/store/worldwide-pc-gaming-hardware-market-report-series-total
 

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