[SOLVED] Is Asrock B550 Phantom Gaming going to be a performance bottleneck for AMD 5900X?

Arbaaz360

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I have my heart set on AMD 5900X. I am going to be using it for occasional 4k video editing. I am not big on gaming but I might want to play a couple of games that my old AMD RX570 GPU would allow. The question I am faced with is - Is Asrock B550 Phantom Gaming going to be bottleneck for AMD5900X? It's relatively cheap and it would be great if it would work well with the CPU. I don't want to spend more than I have to.

Someone told me that it's the worst motherboard in terms of power delivery and stability etc.
 

Arbaaz360

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Asrock Phantom boards do tend to suck, with regards to power delivery. I would choose the Pro4 over a Phantom board. It has shown to be able to handle a 3950x, which is going to be more power hungry, than a 5900x. You may want to look at other boards listed in the video, as well.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wuPH9pCCK-E&t=909s
Pro 4 costs almost same as Phantom gaming. Is it going to be enough?

https://mdcomputers.in/asrock-b550m-pro4.html?gclid=CjwKCAiAz--OBhBIEiwAG1rIOtt0nP-pEmsqWgbeazizNGARfY2YeH6GB3rImpBXqW6nQpdtYyqk8RoCBDwQAvD_BwE
 
They both actually have similar VRM arrangements: 4 phases with doubled MosFET's on both hi-side and lo-side. Should be sufficient power handling for a 5900X so long as you don't attempt fixed overclocking. But that's not adviseable anyway since Ryzen 5000 performs much better across all workloads (especially gaming) with PBO2 and under-volting using Curve Optimizer.

That said, other boards have better VRM arrangements that use efficient DrMOS power stages for cooler operation. But they do tend to cost a bit more in most markets.
 

Arbaaz360

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They both actually have similar VRM arrangements: 4 phases with doubled MosFET's on both hi-side and lo-side. Should be sufficient power handling for a 5900X so long as you don't attempt fixed overclocking. But that's not adviseable anyway since Ryzen 5000 performs much better across all workloads (especially gaming) with PBO2 and under-volting using Curve Optimizer.

That said, other boards have better VRM arrangements that use efficient DrMOS power stages for cooler operation. But they do tend to cost a bit more in most markets.
I am not planning on overclocking it for sure. As you mentioned Pro 4 should be sufficient as far power handling goes. In that case would advantage would I get by choosing a more expensive MB with even better VRM arrangement? I am quite illiterate when it comes to motherboards to be honest. So please excuse my ignorance.
 
I am not planning on overclocking it for sure. As you mentioned Pro 4 should be sufficient as far power handling goes. In that case would advantage would I get by choosing a more expensive MB with even better VRM arrangement? I am quite illiterate when it comes to motherboards to be honest. So please excuse my ignorance.
These boards use older discrete MOS-FET design VRM's, they are less efficient and run hotter than boards with modern DrMOS and especially smart power stages. So the advantage is cooler operation mainly and lower energy use. But even then only something to appreciate while running extremely heavy all-core workloads.

One thing about the Pro4 that is a noteable plus is it has a much more massive heatsink on the FET's. That's going to be a help keeping FET's cool although it won't likely help with CPU performance.

Ryzen 3000 and 5000 works different from older CPU's unless you force it into legacy operating mode by fixed all core overclocking. In stock or even PBO modes it actually likes Vdroop so voltage stability isn't as important. That's something expensive VRM designs excel at so just not needed if not trying that.

Otherwise: the boards with the better power delivery systems also tend to have better feature sets. Things like more super-speed USB ports, USB-C headers for front panel ports, multiple LAN's, 2.5Gb LAN's, WiFi, and so on. And of course: programmable RGB headers. Lots of them.
 
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