Is EVGA's X99 FTW K Motherboard Designed For Overclockers?

Status
Not open for further replies.

Questors

Distinguished
Jan 17, 2004
68
1
18,630
0
Wow! Not a kind overview at all. You might want to actually test it before you decide it's lacking, especially when you start comparing it to other boards. If test results prove the MB is lacking, fine, let us know in the review. Meanwhile in other news, as expected, independent benchmarks have determined the GTX 1080, while pretty awesome, doesn't provide double performance of a Titan X. It barely doubles a GTX 970. See what I did there? You can't judge the proverbial book by it's cover. Read it, then decide whether is was great or it horrible.
AHA! I see what's going on! Tom's got scooped on the first review! Ego much?
 

IInuyasha74

Splendid
Moderator
Your reasoning is a little off here. Nvidia claimed it would double performance of the Titan X with the GTX 1080, but in a foot note it clarified that this was in a very specific workload. What Nvidia did was advertise its product using a statistic it came up with while testing its new card, it wasn't completely honest about the general performance of the GPU, but companies make these claims all the time and it really isn't surprising.

That is completely different than what I did here, where I can actually see all of the parts on the board and get some idea of its abilities from that. The most basic concept about how power phases relate to overclocking potential, is that more power phases leads to better overclocking results. This is because all of the power phases on a board share the task of regulating voltage. Some of the power phases may be used for other components such as memory, PCI-E, the north bridge etc., but most are used for the CPU. If the power phases get too hot, it can lead to thermal throttling, which hampers performance. Because power phases share their work with each other, the effect of having more power phases is that less power needs to run for each individual phase, and thus they remain cooler. This helps to improve overall efficiency, power regulation, overclocking results and has other positive effects on the system.

The simple fact of the matter is the more power phases a board has, the better at overclocking it is in general. Any board targeted as a high-end enthusiast overclocking motherboard should not limit itself to just 8.
 

RedJaron

Splendid
Moderator
MJ, the MSI X99A Godlike Gaming is extended ATX and also has a USB 3.1 Gen 2 connector.

EDIT: Sorry, I see that you meant this is the only EVGA board to meet that criteria.
 

IInuyasha74

Splendid
Moderator


Not a problem, thanks for keeping your eyes out for possible mistakes like that. We are part of the TH team after all.
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
MJ,
in EVGA's defense there are instance where we've seen boards with fewer power phases perform better than boards that had almost 15%more power regulators. I would say if high quality power phases were used like that seen on Gigabyte's IR's then you can say that EVGA did their homework but in your defense, you seem to have the board in your possession and only you can say what the VRM looks like under that heatsink.
 

Questors

Distinguished
Jan 17, 2004
68
1
18,630
0
First, I wish to offer an apology for the "Ego much" comment. It was meant lighthearted, but certainly doesn't come across that way with the tone of the commentary.



That was/is my reasoning as well. It is based on user experience, OC forum communities and articles I have read on sites like TH. I still believe the proof is in the pudding. Test it, review it, and print the results.

This information is taken from the X99 FTW K brochure (PDF): The X99 FTW-K is built with an 8-layer Hybrid Black PCB, featuring a CPU socket with 150% higher Gold content powered by an Advanced 8-phase Digital VRM (IR3563B+IR3350), providing industry-leading stability for all your applications.

My ASUS R5E also has an 8 phase digital power system and is an overclocker's dream.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS