Question is Gigabit ethernet useless with slow internet?

Jul 24, 2020
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i have below 100 mbps connection and im thinking of buying a TP Link Archer A5 because its cheaper than the A6. should i stick with the A5? or why should i buy the A6 instead?
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
i have below 100 mbps connection and im thinking of buying a TP Link Archer A5 because its cheaper than the A6. should i stick with the A5? or why should i buy the A6 instead?
IF it is ever possible to get 100Mb/s or more then the gigabit is worthwhile. 100Mb/s ports are limited to about 90Mb useful bandwidth.
I would never recommend buying 100Mbi hardware today.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
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In my realm, gigabit cable and devices are absolutely required.
I have 100/100 internet service. That gigabit facilitates moving and accessing data between internal devices.

What is your price diff between the A5 and A6?
 

Flayed

Honorable
I think my internet is limited by my old router I'm using as a hub and wifi hotspot. My main router is gigabit but the old one is 100mb.

My max download speed seems to be capped at 11.8MB/s is that the max for 100mb?
 
Jul 24, 2020
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In my realm, gigabit cable and devices are absolutely required.
I have 100/100 internet service. That gigabit facilitates moving and accessing data between internal devices.

What is your price diff between the A5 and A6?
i have 50 mbps internet speed. and the price difference in a5 and a6 is 15 usd
 
Jul 31, 2020
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You want GB Ethernet. The issue is not speed but access. Let me explain.

Ethernet uses an exponential backoff protocol. That is, the physical algorithm tests the line, and if it's busy with a transfer it waits k*e^n time where n is an integer from 1 to 16. In other words, the algorithm waits an exponentially increasing amount of time for the packet transfer to end and the line to become free. So, while it's true that gigabit Ethernet transfer times are 10 times faster than Fast Ethernet times, there is also 10 times as much space between packets for GB Ethernet compared to Fast Ethernet. In other words, you have 10 times the probability of gaining access to the Ethernet cable with GB as compared to Fast Ethernet.
 
You want GB Ethernet. The issue is not speed but access. Let me explain.

Ethernet uses an exponential backoff protocol. That is, the physical algorithm tests the line, and if it's busy with a transfer it waits k*e^n time where n is an integer from 1 to 16. In other words, the algorithm waits an exponentially increasing amount of time for the packet transfer to end and the line to become free. So, while it's true that gigabit Ethernet transfer times are 10 times faster than Fast Ethernet times, there is also 10 times as much space between packets for GB Ethernet compared to Fast Ethernet. In other words, you have 10 times the probability of gaining access to the Ethernet cable with GB as compared to Fast Ethernet.
This is all very true but outdated information. You only do backoff when you get a collision. You only get collisions when you are running half duplex.

Since modern ethernet is all point to point with no hubs and always is set to full duplex you can't get a collision so you never have backoff.

Modern devices can transfer at full rate in both directions constantly.

Gigabit ethernet it mostly one of those might as well do it because the cost difference is so low and maybe you need to transfer between devices in your house which are not limited by the internet speed.
 
Jul 24, 2020
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but im the only one using a computer in my place. Fast Ethernet should be enough for gaming if i dont stream right?
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
but im the only one using a computer in my place. Fast Ethernet should be enough for gaming if i dont stream right?
Yeah.
You don't EVER see yourself having roommates or using your router in a different living situation? Or EVER getting faster internet?
If you don't mind having a router you might have to replace because you didn't spend an extra $15, then it would work -- today.
 

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