Question Is humidityy much of a problem for computer components when its high, like Florida in the summer?

tom2u

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An article on tropical living
https://www.cnbc.com/2021/04/06/retiree-who-left-the-us-for-mexico-downsides-of-living-on-the-beach-for-1200-per-month.html
mentioned "Electronics and appliances rust in ways you’ve never imagined."
I've heard of photographers keeping lenses sealed with dissicant to absorb humid air to reduce the chance of mildew/mold so this got me wondering if it really has much of an affect on most computer components like motherboards. You can't seal that up with desiccant and use it!
So is this really true? Have any of you noticed this?
This would only apply to people living without air conditioning obviously.
 
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DSzymborski

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We do get people here from time to time from hot/humid climates who don't use AC who asks us questions about their PCs with this problem and there's an unbelievable amount of rust inside some of those rigs. It's even worse if you're within 50 miles or so of the ocean and have more salt particles in the air.
 
A lot of the 'inexplicable' rust I've seen in chassis, was eventually explained through either spills, animal urination, or, believe it or not, carpet cleaning/washing.
If you're just talking straight humidity, it would need to be VERY humid, for a long amount of time. It may occur slowly, over the course of several years, and usually on exposed surfaces that are never wiped down or blown off.

(I grew up a hundred miles from the keys)
 
I lived in a place where, if there wasn't some buildings in the way, I could literally see the ocean, and summers would get up to 90F with humidity in the 80% range. And I never ran the AC (I just sat in front of a fan all the time) The only rust that appeared on the computer I was using was on the case. And even then it was just surface rust that you had to really work at it if you wanted to scrape it off. The computer worked fine for 3 or so years before the power supply went kaput.

Plus a lot of metals used in computers are corrosion resistant.
 

mamasan2000

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Wouldn't people in Great Britain, Nordic countries, Iceland etc have to buy new PCs every couple years then? That problem doesn't exist. But what is a problem is leaving your bicycle outside. Because the rain will cause a lot of rust within 1-2 years. Salt and bikes don't mix.
Nordic countries don't have AC. I don't think the others I listed do either.
Where I live (coastal town) the humidity will be high 90s for the next week and that is normal (it is raining). It just about never goes below 70.
 

geofelt

Titan
I live in Florida, some 100 yards from the ocean.
Yes, outside things that are not marine grade stainless or plastic do corrode quickly.
But, inside an air conditioned house, I can say I have never noticed any issue with pc components or other house electronics.

I would not worry.
 

tom2u

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We do get people here from time to time from hot/humid climates who don't use AC who asks us questions about their PCs with this problem and there's an unbelievable amount of rust inside some of those rigs. It's even worse if you're within 50 miles or so of the ocean and have more salt particles in the air.
Wow....that's bad news. But important to know. I was going to the coast. I wonder if there's any way of protecting your desktop computer there. Or a laptop. You could place it in a sealed bag with a pile of dissicant when its not being used
I live in Florida, some 100 yards from the ocean.
Yes, outside things that are not marine grade stainless or plastic do corrode quickly.
But, inside an air conditioned house, I can say I have never noticed any issue with pc components or other house electronics.

I would not worry.
I worry because I won't have air conditioning.
but I wonder if that would matter much if its in use most of the day.
 

tom2u

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Wouldn't people in Great Britain, Nordic countries, Iceland etc have to buy new PCs every couple years then? That problem doesn't exist. But what is a problem is leaving your bicycle outside. Because the rain will cause a lot of rust within 1-2 years. Salt and bikes don't mix.
Nordic countries don't have AC. I don't think the others I listed do either.
Where I live (coastal town) the humidity will be high 90s for the next week and that is normal (it is raining). It just about never goes below 70.
I'm the coast in a northern latitude. Humidity has no affect on us at all. Unless you're right on the water. But in the tropics it seems like its very different. You're damp as soon as you et out of the shower! That's serious humidity.

I wonder if its possible to smear non-conductive grease over some of the metal components? Is grease even conductive? Hard to believe it would be.
 

dwd999

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I lived in a beachfront condo in the '90s. To me, the salt content of the air was more significant than the basic humidity. So it there's a way to measure and avoid the salt, it might not be so bad.
 

tom2u

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I lived in a beachfront condo in the '90s. To me, the salt content of the air was more significant than the basic humidity. So it there's a way to measure and avoid the salt, it might not be so bad.
Oh absolutely - the salt just destroys everything. I probably won't be right on the beach so that should help a lot. Good thing to keep in mind when picking a place though!
 

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