Question Is it better for a cooling fan added to a fanless GPU to be connected to the PSU or the mobo?

Maq___

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Hello,

My GPU is fanless and I would like to add a cooling fan to it,but I don't know what is better ,the cooling fan to be connected to the PSU or to the MOBO?
Please tell me.
 

Eximo

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Either? If you are talking cooling performance, the best will be direct power. Fan running 100% all the time. You could do the same with the motherboard though.

Motherboard may offer control of the fan speed, and you may even be able to tell it to follow the GPU temperature and set fan curves. Depends on your board's capabilities.
 

Maq___

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Either? If you are talking cooling performance, the best will be direct power. Fan running 100% all the time. You could do the same with the motherboard though.

Motherboard may offer control of the fan speed, and you may even be able to tell it to follow the GPU temperature and set fan curves. Depends on your board's capabilities.
Thank you for replying!
My mobo is ASRock P45DE3, could you somehow check its capabilities please?
 

Maq___

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Almost none, a single 4-pin CPU fan header and a 3-pin fan header with no control features. It will report back RPM, that is it.
So the fan should be connected to the PSU,right?

And how long is the life-span of the GPU cooling fans if they work at 100% for all of the the time ?
 

Mtop

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Quote:
"And how long is the life-span of the GPU cooling fans if they work at 100% for all of the the time ? "

Many different types of fans. standard, ball bearing, magnetic levitation. Each fan will have different noise levels, maximum speeds etc...
Shop for what you want, if your looking for long life by one with the best warranty.
 

Eximo

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Yes, different qualities of fans exist, and you aren't really looking at GPU fans, just case fans you are using to cool a passive GPU.

Usually rated in hours and/or Mean Time Between Failures. Every 10,000 hours is roughly equal to a year of continuous service. So 8 hours a day should last 3-4 years. But that is just an estimate, fans can last a very long time.

As for where you should plug it in. I'm not sure how many fans you have now, if you already have two, then you don't really have a choice but to power it directly.
 

John Chesterfield

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Buy an adapter and a couple of PWM fans, connect them directly to the graphics card using the adapter, control the speed through the graphics driver.

Done that a few times, works great.
 

Maq___

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Could you find me a good video tutorial where it is shown step by step how to remove the Zotac nVidia GT 520 Zone Edition GPU ,add the cooling fan ,connect it to the PSU and then put the GPU back please?

I'm a noob so I really need help with doing that.

Also,which dimensions should the cooling fan have according to my GPU's dimensions?
 
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Eximo

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The advice above is a little misguided. That works on GPUs that have fan controllers, this one does not. I looks like it may have a little fan header, but just two wires, so probably just straight power off the bus. My guess would be this is used on an alternative design that has a small fan.

I don't think there are going to be many tutorials out there for this. Personally I would just take a 120mm fan, and strap it to that heatsink with some zip ties. Fan label facing the card. Even something like sticky tack or even glue/epoxy would work as well. Plug the fan directly into Molex, or purchase a 4-pin molex to 3-pin fan adapter, so you can use the fan for other things if needed.

https://www.newegg.com/rosewill-rfa-120-k-case-fan/p/N82E16835200048?&quicklink=true

Your money would be better spent on a faster GPU that has a fan. GT520 is pretty minimal.

You can pick up used GT730 / GTX750 for $35-50 on ebay.
 

John Chesterfield

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The advice above is a little misguided. That works on GPUs that have fan controllers, this one does not.
Ah my bad, wasn't aware of that. In which case..

Personally I would just take a 120mm fan, and strap it to that heatsink with some zip ties.
..is indeed the best solution.

I did this with a 4850 that was an absolute furnace with its blower cooler, strapped a 140mm fan to an Artic Accelero cooler and fitted some ramsinks. Worked very well.
 

Eximo

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I don't see much point in cooling a GT520, wasn't really designed for games. Mostly additional video outputs and to reduce shared memory usage on the PC.

You spend ten bucks on a fan and you are a third of the way to getting a MUCH faster GPU that has a fan.

Also, shopping for fans that come with molex connectors is hard these days. Must be falling out of favor as less and less PSUs include that style of connector. But I also don't see SATA fans out there...

I guess most people would be replacing a CPU or chassis fan. Not very many off the shelf computers that use too many fans if they aren't custom. And people who are building computers tend to pick boards that include a few fan headers, or use fan hubs.
 

Eximo

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Every GPU is somewhat unique so no one can give you exact values. Also not a popular overclocking target, particularly a fanless design.

A single glorious shader model running at 810Mhz default. DDR3 running at 1800Mhz.

Personally never overclocked a GPU with DDR3, so not sure how that will go. Would really depend on the chips in there. An odd speed for DDR3 as well 1600, 1866 would be typical, so possibly target 1866 and see how it goes.

GPU core clock, based on the era, 900Mhz might be possible for the silicon. As I recall my GTX580 ran at 782Mhz stock and I ran it around 900Mhz, both Fermi chips.

Just increase it in steps, monitor temperatures. If it gets too warm or becomes unstable, back it down.
 

Maq___

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I put a 80 mm case fan on the GPU,and since then it idles at 26 degrees,and it reaches 48 degrees at max under high load.

But yesterday while the GPU was idling (after I was gaming before) , a couple of strange lines showed across the screen . I clicked on refresh and the lines gone.
Is there a possibility for that strange lines to be a sign that the GPU is failing?

Also,how can I diagnose a faulty GPU ,or check it for damage?
 
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Eximo

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Physical damage is pretty obvious, just take a look and see if anything is broken. Often see screw driver marks on cards that are installed with little care and attention. Improper storage of loose parts. But if it has just been sitting in the chassis, and you didn't do anything too rough with it while installing your fan, probably not it.

How much tension did you apply to the zipties or whatever attachment method you used. Too much stress on the PCB could bend it slightly and make it lose connection with a few pins in the slot. Try re-seating the card in the slot.

Stress tests and benchmarks are the best testing methods for an end user. If it crashes, artifacts, or becomes generally unstable, then you have your answer.

Could also be your monitor that glitched out for a second, bad connection or something else. I would just wait and see if it happens again, if it doesn't, hooray. If it does, start testing things.

Swap out the monitor cable, try a different port on the GPU, swap out the monitor (if possible).

Capacitors can go bad over time, and random failure in any component is possible.

Really you should be investing in a new GPU in the near future anyway.
 

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