Question Is it ok to plug a UPS and a multi socket strip into the same outlet? They will not be plugged into each other.

outlawstar15a2

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Is it ok to plug a UPS and multi socket into the same outlet? The multi has surge protection but will NOT be plugged into the UPS they would just be sharing the same outlet since I need both since I can't fit all my electronics onto the UPS due to the size and shape of the plugs and adapters (All my important stuff will go onto the UPS though).

Also I was wondering if Tripp Lite makes good UPSes. My final choice is between Tripp Lite and Cyberpower but the Cyberpower UPS I was gonna get has no ethernet ports to plug in my networking stuff so I am leaning towards the Tripp Lite UPS.

Tripp Lite: https://www.amazon.com/Tripp-Lite-SMART1500TSU-Battery-Desktop/dp/B07XG5Y328/ref=sr_1_24?dchild=1&keywords=1200w+sine+ups&qid=1610766309&s=electronics&sr=1-24
Cyberpower: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0083TXNMM/ref=ewc_pr_img_2?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1
 

outlawstar15a2

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as long as you are not over loading the circuit you should be good
Is there a reason why UPSese with dataline protection usually only support 10/100 ethernet? I have an 1000 Mbps connection that is useless for me and I really want dataline protection as I am concerned a future power event might come via ethernet so I want some protection for it. Also why are most UPSes simulated sine? Sigh
 

Paperdoc

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Most likely cost on the first item, Definitely cost on the second.

Gigabit Ethernet components require much better design and construction to guarantee that fast data transfer rate. Adding that to a UPS ir power bar would increase the price a bit, and so many people have not yet reached to the Gigabit local network plateau, they feel it's not worthwhile to include it in most of their lines. But conside how your get access to (whatever) using the gigabit ethernet cables. Is the source operating at gigabit rates, like a fibre optic line? That normally starts in your house with an interface box that converts optical signlas to electrical network signals, and that bos itself is the only beginning of the electrical signal on your internal network. If IT is protected from generating electrical spikes on its outputs, you don't need to use the UPS's feature to protest your internal network.

On the other hand, if your feed of info from the outside is a slower electrical signal source like a 10 or 100 MB/s data rate, you CAN use that UPS feature to protect your internal network from those external sources of surges. It will not limit your network overall, but it will affect the data rate of the incoming signals. They already are limited, anyway, so it makes no difference.

Regarding real sine wave output from the UPS, it certainly is a cost factor lnked to the technical complexity. Generating a pure sine wave and then ampliying that to feed 120 V at MANY amps is an expensive design and construction, and may have some reduction in power use efficiency. Doing it instead by a rough simulation of a sine wave by many steps can be done much more simply and hence cheaply.
 

outlawstar15a2

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Mar 25, 2010
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Most likely cost on the first item, Definitely cost on the second.

Gigabit Ethernet components require much better design and construction to guarantee that fast data transfer rate. Adding that to a UPS ir power bar would increase the price a bit, and so many people have not yet reached to the Gigabit local network plateau, they feel it's not worthwhile to include it in most of their lines. But conside how your get access to (whatever) using the gigabit ethernet cables. Is the source operating at gigabit rates, like a fibre optic line? That normally starts in your house with an interface box that converts optical signlas to electrical network signals, and that bos itself is the only beginning of the electrical signal on your internal network. If IT is protected from generating electrical spikes on its outputs, you don't need to use the UPS's feature to protest your internal network.

On the other hand, if your feed of info from the outside is a slower electrical signal source like a 10 or 100 MB/s data rate, you CAN use that UPS feature to protect your internal network from those external sources of surges. It will not limit your network overall, but it will affect the data rate of the incoming signals. They already are limited, anyway, so it makes no difference.

Regarding real sine wave output from the UPS, it certainly is a cost factor lnked to the technical complexity. Generating a pure sine wave and then ampliying that to feed 120 V at MANY amps is an expensive design and construction, and may have some reduction in power use efficiency. Doing it instead by a rough simulation of a sine wave by many steps can be done much more simply and hence cheaply.
I have Verizon FIOS which uses an ONT (whatever that is) plus it's own battery backup to provide emergency power for the FIOS phone service in case I need to make phone calls during a blackout. There is a wire which goes directly to my Router, I assume it's from my ONT, and then a ethernet runs from the router to my PC. The Router will be plugged into the UPS but I'm worried about power sags/spikes traveling from the router to the PC via ethernet. That's my only remaining concern the UPS I picked is Active PFC compatible and pure sine when on battery (supposedly). Both the Router and I assume the ONT plug directly into the wall. Not sure if I will be able to plug them both into the UPS because of the shapes of the plugs themselves.
 

Paperdoc

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ONT stands for Optical Network Terminal. Our system (from a different supplier) consists of three boxes. There's a power supply box plugged into a wall outlet, and feeding to the ONT via a single cable. The ONT box is the interface between the fibre optic cable and the house units. It is the ONLY item with a connection to the outside world, and that connection is optical fibre only - light, no electricity. It cannot carry a power surge from outside. In turn it has two output ports. One is simply the standard telephone land-line for phones in the house, and the other is the Ethernet output to the Router. That last device is a standard router that includes a WiFi system, and it is plugged into a wall outlet.

The old land-line phone system from its beginnings worked on low-voltage DC supplied by the wire connection into your house and carried around the house by phone lines. Power for a whole telephone exchange system is provided by a by battery system at the exchange building kept charged by a charger system fed from regular AC electricity supplies. A main function of this design is that the batteries are an important part of removing hum from the original AC power source, but it guarantees continued function of the land-line system for extended power outages based on the batteries. That is considered a vital safety feature in emergencies. (You nay have noted the problems caused for Cell Phone users in emergencies - the Cell Phone towers have no power backup.) So the power supply module in our house for the fibre optic set has two outputs in its feed cable: one powers the ONT's ethernet output to the Router, and it is NOT backed up - it shuts down when wall power fails. But the other output actually comes from a small UPS system in that power module, specifically to keep the land-line system in the home live and its connection to the world via the optical cable functioning. Note the difference. A standard old land-line system is a direct power feed into your house's phone lines from outside, and can be subject to surges from outside. In the case of the Optical Fibre system, the only power supplied to your in-house landlines AND to your ethernet lines comes from the ONT fed by its local power supply module. So the main potential source of surges is from the wall outlet and through the power supply module which should have some surge protection built in. There's also wall power though the Router, which MAY have some surge protection of its own.

In the gigabit wired network my son has installed here, the Router and an additional WiFi Point of Access high-performance device are on a UPS to guarantee the network functions in a power disruption. But the weak point with the new optical cable system was the ONT - specifically the fact that the ethernet part is allowed to fail when power fails. So we installed a second UPS to feed that first power supply box. That way it will not experience a power failure of any kind as long as it is short enough for the UPS to keep power going. We don't really know exactly how long "short enough" is, but the power consumption by the optical terminal and its power box is pretty small.

Our installation was created with a focus of continued internet access for computers and WiFi users during a power outage. We have not worried about electrical surges from outside the house on this. We are relying, I guess, on the surge suppression abilities of the UPS that feeds our system, and on whatever surge suppression is built into the power supply module of the optical set-up.
 

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