Question Is It OK???

Mazzahir Abbas

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Oct 8, 2014
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I am using AMD Ryzen 5 3600 with MSI X470 Gaming Pro Carbon. Ryzen master showing some figures i dont understand...
1- 228% of 88W (PPT-CPU)
2- 412% of 60A (TDC-CPU)
3- 275% of 90A (EDC-CPU)
Cpu temp is 46-47c
 
I am using AMD Ryzen 5 3600 with MSI X470 Gaming Pro Carbon. Ryzen master showing some figures i dont understand...
1- 228% of 88W (PPT-CPU)
2- 412% of 60A (TDC-CPU)
3- 275% of 90A (EDC-CPU)
Cpu temp is 46-47c
I assume you are running some kind of extremely 'stressy' application at the time.

It's saying your processor is exeeding the processor's default boost limits for power (PPT), instantaneous current (EDC) and total current (TDC). I think you've enabled PBO but not also establishend manual over-rides for boost limits.

You can do that in the BIOS: go in to CPU Advanced Settings on the Overclocking screen and set Boost Overrides to 'advanced' and several options should open up, one for each of those. Set each of them to 1000; they'll default back to a number that MSI feels the motherboard VRM is actually capable of delivering.

It's probably not an issue for a 6 core processor, but running a 12 or 16 core processor in way that completely ignores the VRM seems a bit risky to me.

And do take note: this is PBO overclocking and like manual all-core overclocking it does void your CPU warranty.
 
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Mazzahir Abbas

Reputable
Oct 8, 2014
7
0
4,510
0
I assume you are running some kind of extremely 'stressy' application at the time.

It's saying your processor is exeeding the processor's default boost limits for power (PPT), instantaneous current (EDC) and total current (TDC). I think you've enabled PBO but not also establishend manual over-rides for boost limits.

You can do that in the BIOS: go in to CPU Advanced Settings on the Overclocking screen and set Boost Overrides to 'advanced' and several options should open up, one for each of those. Set each of them to 1000; they'll default back to a number that MSI feels the motherboard VRM is actually capable of delivering.

It's probably not an issue for a 6 core processor, but running a 12 or 16 core processor in way that completely ignores the VRM seems a bit risky to me.

And do take note: this is PBO overclocking and like manual all-core overclocking it does void your CPU warranty.
No workload... System was on Idle condition...
Yes i did not check any bios setting for CPU... I will check it for Manual settings...
 
No workload... System was on Idle condition...
Yes i did not check any bios setting for CPU... I will check it for Manual settings...
Oh, if Ryzenmaster is reporting that and it's not working at all then something is wrong. Those values should be sitting close to zero.

I'd suggest going into BIOS and do a reset to defaults... it's on the SAVE menu. Then reboot and go into windows and see if you're still seeing those readings in Ryzenmaster.

If you are then re-install the latest chipset drivers, downloaded only from AMD.com.
 
Precision Boost is like XFR, AMD’s Extended Frequency Range boosting table for boosting a limited number of cores when possible. XFR was introduced with the first Ryzen series CPUs. Precision Boost takes into account three numbers in deciding how many cores can boost and when, and those numbers are PPT, TDC, and EDC, as well as temperature and the chip’s max boost clock. Precision Boost is enabled on a stock CPU.

PPT-CPU

1) Package Power Tracking (“PPT”): The PPT threshold is the allowed socket power consumption permitted across the voltage rails supplying the socket. Applications with high thread counts, and/or “heavy” threads, can encounter PPT limits that can be alleviated with a raised PPT limit.

Default for Socket AM4 is at least 88W on motherboards rated for Ryzen 5 3600.

The higher limits are for Precision Boost Overdrive 228% of 88W (PPT-CPU).

Precision Boost is enabled on a stock CPU, Precision Boost Overdrive is not. What PBO does not ever do is boost the frequency beyond the advertised CPU clocks.

What is important to note is that PBO only affects these three power limits. You may never reach those limits you asked about with PBO on and the Overclock PBO provides may give you 1 or 2% better results than with it off.

2) Thermal Design Current (“TDC”): The maximum current (amps) that can be delivered by a specific motherboard’s voltage regulator configuration in thermally-constrained scenarios.

3) Electrical Design Current (“EDC”): The maximum current (amps) that can be delivered by a specific motherboard’s voltage regulator configuration in a peak (“spike”) condition for a short period of time.
 
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Mazzahir Abbas

Reputable
Oct 8, 2014
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4,510
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I think i am able to fix the issue... There was option in Bios of Game Boost... I disable that option and now system is behaving just fine...
Thanks to all for the positive inputs....
 

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