[SOLVED] Is it possible for convert a 30fps gaming video into 60 fps smoother video?

sxk1277

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I don't want to just double frames by copying it, I want smoother video. I want to watch gaming videos where both resolution and fps are high. Imagine watching a 8k 144fps video. But since no pc can handle that load, is it possible to let the game play on high resolution and have fps render afterwards instead of live on demand? This way, I can have plenty of content to watch in both 8k and high fps at the same time?!
 

bit_user

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I meant revolutionary as in if there is a known ongoing effort to increase fps in monitor or if they exist for some industrial use. I doubt brands are trying to create monitors that can play video at 1000fps due to lack of demand. However, I may wait a few years instead of investing into this avenue if others are already working on it.
If you haven't seen this, it's worth a read:


It explores the issues of conventional display technologies and benefits of various advancements. Towards the bottom, they have links to videos on Nvidia's prototype 1,700 and 16,000 Hz displays.

Also, this:


...in which an Asus rep supposedly mentions that the company is on the "road to 1000 Hz".

If we merge different videos and it creates a higher fps, it would probably still increase the file size and may not be efficient.
In a previous post, I think you observed that the information content of each frame is inversely related to the framerate. In that case, simply doubling the framerate should increase the filesize by much less than a factor of 2, though it obviously depends on the content, codec, and compression settings.

But I was thinking about playing 2 videos simultaneously on top of each other. Is there a way to make video transparent?
It's an interesting idea, but I'm not sure how practical it'd be. You could do something like that in a decent video editing tool, and then render out the "enhanced" video for playback in a normal player.

So I can lay different renderings of the same video on top each other while playing so even though each video will be 60 fps, maybe when played together, they will feel like 120 fps?
It wouldn't be ideal for increasing the frame rate, however. Even assuming the frame timestamps were sufficienty accurate and you could achieve proper temporal alignment between the clips, you'd have two frames from different times being visible, simultaneously. If your goal is to have smooth motion, without excessive blur, it would be counter-productive.

Here is what I'm wondering about the wheel experiment. If a wheel spins, why doesn't the points closer to its center become blurry slower than points towards the end since they travel at a faster speed?
Uh, they should.

Perhaps you could overlay a slit, to help you focus on the linear-tangential motion, since your eyes will tend to follow the spokes (or pattern/image, if you tape something to the wheel) all the way around.

And the conversation method I used, was it right? Is it right to divide by 3 inches just because thats my frame of focus?
I didn't think about it too hard, but it sounds plausible.
 
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Gam3r01

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What your talking about wouldnt be possible for a "live" source like gameplay, since the frames have to be displayed as they occur.
If you were to render each frame one by one, yes you could theoretically have 144 frames per second at 8k. The only problem is getting those 144 frames, the game would have to run them at that correct rate.
If it was something, say, animated, then yes just render the frames by hand.
In the physical world something like a high speed camera could also do what you ask.

But its not possible for a game to later render out the frames it didnt render in the first place.
 

sxk1277

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I'm one of those people who likes watching games more than playing them. I just want 8k high fps gaming content to watch. I don't care about playing the game live. How do I get my game to render fps to prepare a video at high fps?
 

sxk1277

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I feel because games aren't designed for this feature. This isn't possible. But it sounds like a possible idea if someone created a software for it maybe? I would love to watch games at both ultra high definition and ultra high fps !!
 

Gam3r01

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You could, in theory, with developer level access use the game engine to output specifically pre-rendered frames to provide the proper pacing for 144Hz at 8k, but that would just be a movie at that point.
 

sxk1277

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To make sure we are saying the same thing, I would want whatever I do in a game, to be saved for later processing for more fps. Those later fps will still be as real as live fps for anyone who is watching the recorded video. Could the same feature be implemented to pump out footage at 16k?
 

sxk1277

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What do you mean its not possible with current tech? Would it be possible at 30 fps to 60 fps level? Where exactly does the bottleneck fall in?
 

sxk1277

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Its not really a hardware issue though. Those same graphic card and processor could be used to render animations. If game developers included that feature, couldn't it be done?
 

USAFRet

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Its not really a hardware issue though. Those same graphic card and processor could be used to render animations. If game developers included that feature, couldn't it be done?
In the game, the hardware is already rendering at whatever framerate it is doing.

You propose to do that, AND save it (or even upscale) at the same time?
 

sxk1277

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Upscaling wont be done at the same time. It will be done after you're done playing. But I want accurate upscaling, not some video trick, using the game engine.
 

sxk1277

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But that's the point. The game could save the data for that pixel instead of manufacturing it while playing the game so the future up-scaling will be real. Why shouldn't this be doable?
 

USAFRet

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But that's the point. The game could save the data for that pixel instead of manufacturing it while playing the game so the future up-scaling will be real. Why shouldn't this be doable?
If its going through the work to render the pixel to save for later, why not show it now?

Who knows...it might BE doable.
But since we've not seen that functionality anywhere...
 

henterpriser

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But that's the point. The game could save the data for that pixel instead of manufacturing it while playing the game so the future up-scaling will be real. Why shouldn't this be doable?
If they SAVE every pixels pre-rendered the game size would go over Terabytes!(there are infinite possibilities which means infinite pixels...)
Instead they learn your system to render every picture it needs then delete them. thats the point of game engines.
 

Gam3r01

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If they SAVE every pixels pre-rendered the game size would go over Terabytes!(there are infinite possibilities which means infinite pixels...)
Instead they learn your system to render every picture it needs then delete them. thats the point of game engines.
To add context to this, my camera roughly outputs around 6k res, slightly over (6240 x 4160).
A single image is around 20MB
So at 144 FPS, that would be 2.8 Gigabytes of data per second
 
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sxk1277

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I don't mind compressing the video like DSR. Besides, I don't need hours of footage. Even a few minutes will be a good enough to test to see if I want to play at higher resolution or fps. For instance, I think in a blind test, I can tell the difference upto 720 fps. (On a youtube video) Airforce pilots are known to be able to do this for up 600. (read in a random forum, source not available)

Here is another methodology of doing the same thing. Instead of saving pixel data, the game could save the command you input and the way AI interacted with you. After you are done playing the game, the game engine would then slowly render and recreate that scenario in a much higher quality. I'm thinking, the bottleneck happens because the burden isn't only generating that amount of graphics, but it is generating it immediately. So by allowing the computer to take all the time it needs, it should in theory generate a better quality.
 
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henterpriser

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Even a few minutes will be a good enough to test to see if I want to play at higher resolution or fps.
There you go a youtube video about the Res VS fps comparison:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5h9uCl1Hpew

For instance, I think in a blind test, I can tell the difference upto 720 fps. (On a youtube video) Airforce pilots are known to be able to do this for up 600. (read in a random forum, source not available)
What sort of super advanced display devices you have that they can show up to 720FPS?
 

sxk1277

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No, I'm not saying that. The tests air force pilots did was probably more rigorous than mine. I was only testing if I could notice the difference between fps quality. Air force pilots I think were asked to identify an image...

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMpf6QCUF7E


Data only matters to what your eyes can notice. Its hard to tell the difference between DSR and real because the extra 3 pixels are actually fit into 1 pixel:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8i0N0-iGNdA
 

henterpriser

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Those evil youtube videos haven't told you that your current display(the one you are watching the vids from it) should be capable of running those frame rates otherwise you will not actually see them?

for example in that useless minecraft video(the fps can't be even that high, youtube will not handle it) if you are watching it on 144hz monitor you will not notice anything over this rate. unless they are applying some smoothing to those vids everytime they say fps goes up to fake the fps effect
 

henterpriser

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in that minecraft video he's not even using any fps meter just added some lines of text.
how can you trust these.
He's probably using some sort of smoothness effect or something.
 

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