[SOLVED] Is it possible to hit 4Ghz overclock on I5-6600k and not touch the voltage?

Jul 23, 2020
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Hello!

Very new to overclocking, I've only been reading guides and tutorials out there and haven't done it myself because I am a bit scared if that's understandable lol.

I was wondering if it was possible to hit 4.0 Ghz on stock voltage, and if I did theoretically try it, and it BSOD can I go back to bios and revert?

(I am very new and don't really have that much prior knowledge.)

EDIT:

here are my pc specs.
Cooler: Deepcool GAMMAX 400S Intel
Motherboard: Z170-HD3P-CF
Ram: G Skill Ripjaws v 8gb 2400mhz x2
SSD/HDD: (I Don't know the specifics, but I have a 1 TB HDD and a samsung evo 250 GB SSD)
GPU: GTX 1060 6GB
PSU: Thermaltake Smart RGB 700w
OS: Windows 10 Pro
 
Last edited:

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
There's a phenomenon known generally as the Silicon Lottery. Basically every chip is unique, the silicon it's made from has different impurities in different levels than any other cpu. Because of that, every cpu responds slightly differently.

My i7-3770K can hit 5GHz at 1.4v. Most cannot. You shouldn't have any issue hitting 4.0GHz or better, but there's no guarantee. There's nothing beyond stock turbo settings that is. Because of the Silicon Lottery. It's a pot luck thing. My i5-3570k would not remain stable at anything over 4.3GHz, and apart from hyperthreading, it's pretty much the exact same cpu as my i7-3770K. Big difference.

4.0GHz, most likely. But no guarantee yes or no. It'll also depend on voltages and temps, they might require way more than you or the cpu is comfortable with.

Only way to find out for sure is to try. But before you do, READ, READ, READ. Everything, everywhere you can on what OC is, what it's does, how to do it on your motherboard etc. The more you know about it, the better your chances of a successful OC, within its limits.
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
That will depend on the CPU sample you have and how good the VRM's on your board are. Overclocking(and undervolting) isn't a magical number that you key in and you fly straight to it. It takes some trial and error to get the results that your sample is capable of reaching.

Please include/list your specs like so:
CPSU:
OS:erboard:
Ram:
SSD/HDD:
GPU:
GPU:
PSU:
OS:

About reverting, your board should have a CMOS button to reset the board to factory defaults.
 
Reactions: Slupfee
Jul 23, 2020
6
0
10
0
That will depend on the CPU sample you have and how good the VRM's on your board are. Overclocking(and undervolting) isn't a magical number that you key in and you fly straight to it. It takes some trial and error to get the results that your sample is capable of reaching.

Please include/list your specs like so:
CPSU:
OS:erboard:
Ram:
SSD/HDD:
GPU:
GPU:
PSU:
OS:

About reverting, your board should have a CMOS button to reset the board to factory defaults.
Oh sorry, I forgot adding them

here are my pc specs.
Cooler: Deepcool GAMMAX 400S Intel
Motherboard: Z170-HD3P-CF
Ram: G Skill Ripjaws v 8gb 2400mhz x2
SSD/HDD: (I Don't know the specifics, but I have a 1 TB HDD and a samsung evo 250 GB SSD)
GPU: GTX 1060 6GB
PSU: Thermaltake Smart RGB 700w
OS: Windows 10 Pro
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
There's a phenomenon known generally as the Silicon Lottery. Basically every chip is unique, the silicon it's made from has different impurities in different levels than any other cpu. Because of that, every cpu responds slightly differently.

My i7-3770K can hit 5GHz at 1.4v. Most cannot. You shouldn't have any issue hitting 4.0GHz or better, but there's no guarantee. There's nothing beyond stock turbo settings that is. Because of the Silicon Lottery. It's a pot luck thing. My i5-3570k would not remain stable at anything over 4.3GHz, and apart from hyperthreading, it's pretty much the exact same cpu as my i7-3770K. Big difference.

4.0GHz, most likely. But no guarantee yes or no. It'll also depend on voltages and temps, they might require way more than you or the cpu is comfortable with.

Only way to find out for sure is to try. But before you do, READ, READ, READ. Everything, everywhere you can on what OC is, what it's does, how to do it on your motherboard etc. The more you know about it, the better your chances of a successful OC, within its limits.
 
Jul 23, 2020
6
0
10
0
Only way to find out for sure is to try. But before you do, READ, READ, READ. Everything, everywhere you can on what OC is, what it's does, how to do it on your motherboard etc. The more you know about it, the better your chances of a successful OC, within its limits.
Thank you for the advice, I've actually been watching youtube videos and reading some pinned guides from the overclocking reddit and here for quite a while now. the only thing stopping me to try it is partly because I'm scared I might mess up something(even though people have said that not touching the voltage doesn't really mess anything up)

Should I be scared if my system does BSOD? or is it just normal for the system to do that to save itself from being damaged?
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Scared? Lol, no. Actually the opposite. When overclocking you are trying to get a higher than stock speed, on multiple/all cores, at the lowest stable voltages, allowing the lowest load temps. The purpose of thorough tests isn't to see if the OC is good and stable, it's looking for the bluescreens, forcing the pc to bluescreen.

Think of it this way. You jack up the speeds, get everything set where you want it. Then go to lower voltages. If you started out at 1.4v and tested good, that's not a successful OC. Drop to 1.39v tests good. Still not a successful OC. You can keep dropping for days and still not be successful, because there's always more. Instead of trying to pass, hunt for the voltage that fails. Look for the bluescreen. Because that's beyond the capability of the cpu. Bump the voltage back up 1 or 2 notches, test again, looking for the bluescreen. If you don't get one. Bingo. Successful OC. You have now found the cpus lowest stable limits for the speeds, LLC, vccio, ring etc.

In math it's called looking for the lowest common denominator. 49/56ths is fine, 7/8ths is better.

You can't mess up an OC. There's a default of 3 attempts at a bios post, if they fail you'll automatically revert to the last known stable bios.
Failing that you can always reset the bios by jumping the cmos jumpers according to directions or pull the battery for 10ish minutes.
 
Jul 23, 2020
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Ah, sorry scared isn't the right word, something more akin to nervous would be more like it.

I guess I should read more about what kind BSOD error code I can encounter on an LGA 1151, so I can adjust when needed.

Thank you for the information, it really helps.
 

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