[SOLVED] Is it possible to mix security standards?

4x Fan

Distinguished
Jun 5, 2014
45
0
18,530
0
I plan to install an Asus AX6600 2-pack in my home over the weekend. The backhaul will be totally wireless. I'd like to take advantage of the WPA3 standard, but have a few legacy devices in my home that aren't compatible. Can I use my old router (TP Link AC1900) as an access point to connect to my legacy devices (using WPA2/WPA) while the new Asus units to are set to WPA3/WPA2 for everything else? Or will this simply not work?

Thanks in advance.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Thanks. I wasn't aware of that. By extension, is it also true that if I have the security set at WPA2/WPA, then it is no more secure than WPA?

I have two devices that use WPA3 (iPhones). I have one device that uses WPA (an older model thermostat). Everything else uses WPA2. I want to make my system as secure as possible, but it looks like I may not be able to utilize WPA3.
You always have to ask "Does anybody care enough about me to bother?" Joe Six-Pack on Nevermind Ave has nothing anybody would care about. As long as you have WPA in use you will have a security vulnerability. But 1000s of people have default passwords on everything. Unless you do something to stand out, your WIFI will never get a second look, because there is no money there.
So maybe your first priority should be to replace the or disable the WIFI or the outdated thermostat. Does it REALLY need WIFI ???
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
I plan to install an Asus AX6600 2-pack in my home over the weekend. The backhaul will be totally wireless. I'd like to take advantage of the WPA3 standard, but have a few legacy devices in my home that aren't compatible. Can I use my old router (TP Link AC1900) as an access point to connect to my legacy devices (using WPA2/WPA) while the new Asus units to are set to WPA3/WPA2 for everything else? Or will this simply not work?

Thanks in advance.
As long as you use WPA3/WPA2 transition, it is no more secure than WPA2.
 

4x Fan

Distinguished
Jun 5, 2014
45
0
18,530
0
As long as you use WPA3/WPA2 transition, it is no more secure than WPA2.
Thanks. I wasn't aware of that. By extension, is it also true that if I have the security set at WPA2/WPA, then it is no more secure than WPA?

I have two devices that use WPA3 (iPhones). I have one device that uses WPA (an older model thermostat). Everything else uses WPA2. I want to make my system as secure as possible, but it looks like I may not be able to utilize WPA3.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Thanks. I wasn't aware of that. By extension, is it also true that if I have the security set at WPA2/WPA, then it is no more secure than WPA?

I have two devices that use WPA3 (iPhones). I have one device that uses WPA (an older model thermostat). Everything else uses WPA2. I want to make my system as secure as possible, but it looks like I may not be able to utilize WPA3.
You always have to ask "Does anybody care enough about me to bother?" Joe Six-Pack on Nevermind Ave has nothing anybody would care about. As long as you have WPA in use you will have a security vulnerability. But 1000s of people have default passwords on everything. Unless you do something to stand out, your WIFI will never get a second look, because there is no money there.
So maybe your first priority should be to replace the or disable the WIFI or the outdated thermostat. Does it REALLY need WIFI ???
 
Now "you" might be concerned about security but it seems the vast majority of people are not. They think some magic button on there smart light bulb is almost too much work, if they had to actually put in a password you know the world would end.

Most these smart devices use WPS which is a massive security exposure but still is actually turned on by default on many routers. From what I can tell WPS can never work with WPA3 so if everyone were to go to WPA3 only all the people that are too lazy to learn anything would stop buying products

On the other extreme I think this is a scam by equipment makers to scare people into buying more stuff for a problem that does not really exist. What is going on is they are saying that computer power has increased and the encryption can now be cracked in less time. They neglect to mention you need
the super computers that only government spy organizations have to begin with. This really is not some worry for your general home user.

Wifi in general is hard to hack because you have to be so near by Many people have trouble getting usable signals to work inside their house it will be harder for the hacker parked in the street in front of your house.
 
Reactions: 4x Fan

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS