Question Is It Possible To Move System Reserved Partition?

Nateeee

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Sep 27, 2015
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I recently discovered that this whole time I had the system reserved partition on the wrong drive.

I have two drives one 250gb SSD for my favorite programs and Windows 10 and a 1TB HDD for everything else. I opened disk manager and noticed that system reserved partition is under the 1TB HDD and now it's really bugging me is there any way for me to move the system reserved partition from my HDD to my boot drive (SSD)?

Any help would be appreciated!
 
here a link to a screenshot thank you.
You have to realise that what you are trying to do is somewhat dangerous and could lead to your system not booting up anymore.

Moving the partition is the worst thing you could do,it's default generic files anyway so there is no need to do that.

You can create a System Reserved Partition on your C drive by moving the whole partition to the end of the drive(would take quite a long time and a power outage would likely destroy data on that drive) and using the 512MB free space that would now be at the start of the disk to manually create one but it's not necessary to do that.

What you should do is to use the free community version of easyBCD, which is just a front end to the BCD commands that windows comes with,so if you are ok with typing in commands you could do that with the console, to deploy BCD to your C drive by writing an MBR and installing BCD right on the C partition,then load that BCD store into easyBCD and tell it to start up the OS on the C drive.

After that remove the D drive by just removing it from the list of disks in the bios and make sure to make your C drive the first boot device, remember your previous settings though,otherwise disconnecting the power plug from the drive will assure that the settings will remain untouched.
This is just to make sure that the C drive now is able to boot up on it's own.

After you are satisfied you can delete the System Reserved Partition from the D drive but honestly it's a nice back up for when you have boot issues.
 

Nateeee

Reputable
Sep 27, 2015
5
0
4,510
0
You have to realise that what you are trying to do is somewhat dangerous and could lead to your system not booting up anymore.

Moving the partition is the worst thing you could do,it's default generic files anyway so there is no need to do that.

You can create a System Reserved Partition on your C drive by moving the whole partition to the end of the drive(would take quite a long time and a power outage would likely destroy data on that drive) and using the 512MB free space that would now be at the start of the disk to manually create one but it's not necessary to do that.

What you should do is to use the free community version of easyBCD, which is just a front end to the BCD commands that windows comes with,so if you are ok with typing in commands you could do that with the console, to deploy BCD to your C drive by writing an MBR and installing BCD right on the C partition,then load that BCD store into easyBCD and tell it to start up the OS on the C drive.

After that remove the D drive by just removing it from the list of disks in the bios and make sure to make your C drive the first boot device, remember your previous settings though,otherwise disconnecting the power plug from the drive will assure that the settings will remain untouched.
This is just to make sure that the C drive now is able to boot up on it's own.

After you are satisfied you can delete the System Reserved Partition from the D drive but honestly it's a nice back up for when you have boot issues.
I'm sorry, I'm not really familiar with the BCD commands nor have I ever used easyBCD. I just installed the free community version to my C drive. Under BCD Deployment page I see the option to install BCD and Write BCD. If it's not too much trouble could you give me more specific steps? So far I have just clicked Write BCD and selected the main partition on my C drive and clicked install BCD. I am unsure what to do next.
 

Nateeee

Reputable
Sep 27, 2015
5
0
4,510
0
You have to realise that what you are trying to do is somewhat dangerous and could lead to your system not booting up anymore.

Moving the partition is the worst thing you could do,it's default generic files anyway so there is no need to do that.

You can create a System Reserved Partition on your C drive by moving the whole partition to the end of the drive(would take quite a long time and a power outage would likely destroy data on that drive) and using the 512MB free space that would now be at the start of the disk to manually create one but it's not necessary to do that.

What you should do is to use the free community version of easyBCD, which is just a front end to the BCD commands that windows comes with,so if you are ok with typing in commands you could do that with the console, to deploy BCD to your C drive by writing an MBR and installing BCD right on the C partition,then load that BCD store into easyBCD and tell it to start up the OS on the C drive.

After that remove the D drive by just removing it from the list of disks in the bios and make sure to make your C drive the first boot device, remember your previous settings though,otherwise disconnecting the power plug from the drive will assure that the settings will remain untouched.
This is just to make sure that the C drive now is able to boot up on it's own.

After you are satisfied you can delete the System Reserved Partition from the D drive but honestly it's a nice back up for when you have boot issues.
I don't know that program myself but its based on the paid version so their FAQ may help - https://neosmart.net/forums/threads/faqs-please-read-before-posting-with-a-problem.3153/
Okay Thank you guys, I did some messing around with EasyBCD for some reason it made another 500mb partition on my C drive that was unallocated so I hit the extend option on disk management on my C drive to get rid of the unallocated space which worked fine. After using Easy BCD to boot only with the C drive I was able to remove the system reserve partition from the D drive in disk management and it turned the space into the black unallocated space i. I tried to do the same thing and expand the D drive to get rid of the 500mb unallocated partiton but I think I messed something up. Thinking of just reinstalling windows at this point

<image removed by moderator due to vulgar language>
 
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