Question Is it possible to put a GPU in an Inspiron 3668?

Jan 22, 2020
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I bought this PC about 2 years ago without doing enough research, not realizing how hard it is to upgrade it.
Every time I think i figured out a way to add a GPU, some other problem comes up and completely shuts the idea down.
The PSU, (240w) doesn't seem to have any extra cables to plug into a GPU, at all. It's got 1x 4-pin connector for the CPU, and 1x 6-pin connector that goes directly into the motherboard. And the case is too small for most Graphics cards anyways.
Feels like Dell really doesn't want you changing this thing.

It's got an i5-7400 CPU, and 12gb RAM. Any help is appreciated.
 

Wolfshadw

Titan
Moderator
Of course, Dell doesn't want you to change their systems. When it doesn't do what you want it to do, they want you to buy another computer from them!

The 240 watt power supply and likely low-profile configurations are the limiting factors. While I don't recommend it, some people have reported getting a Geforce GT730 working on that power supply. Again, I don't recommend it because what you have is well below the recommended power supply for that card.

Given your power supply, there really isn't a graphics card that I would recommend.

-Wolf sends
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Feels like Dell really doesn't want you changing this thing.
Fairly accurate.

However, can it be done? Absolutely.


The board has an available PCIe x16 slot - so a card is physically compatible with the board (although factors such as room inside the case come into play).

With a 240W PSU, your options are extremely limited. Given the slim PSU form factor & somewhat proprietary connectors, it's not particularly easy to replace/upgrade the PSU either.

You have a peak power draw that should be <100W all in (65W TDP CPU, minimal for RAM etc)....
With that, at least theoretically, you could install/power any PCIe-only powered GPU (max 75W).

On the face of it, I don't see any reason a small form factor 1650 wouldn't work.
It's not exactly 'recommended' without spec'ing out the PSU definitively, but on the face of it at least, it should work.
https://pcpartpicker.com/product/QVrmP6/zotac-geforce-gtx-1650-4-gb-gaming-oc-video-card-zt-t16500f-10l

Also, cards like a 1050TI would be decent options if you can find them used.

EDIT. Looks like it's spec'd for 16A on the 12V rail... so 192W.
 
Jan 22, 2020
5
0
10
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Fairly accurate.

However, can it be done? Absolutely.


The board has an available PCIe x16 slot - so a card is physically compatible with the board (although factors such as room inside the case come into play).

With a 240W PSU, your options are extremely limited. Given the slim PSU form factor & somewhat proprietary connectors, it's not particularly easy to replace/upgrade the PSU either.

You have a peak power draw that should be <100W all in (65W TDP CPU, minimal for RAM etc)....
With that, at least theoretically, you could install/power any PCIe-only powered GPU (max 75W).

On the face of it, I don't see any reason a small form factor 1650 wouldn't work.
It's not exactly 'recommended' without spec'ing out the PSU definitively, but on the face of it at least, it should work.
https://pcpartpicker.com/product/QVrmP6/zotac-geforce-gtx-1650-4-gb-gaming-oc-video-card-zt-t16500f-10l

Also, cards like a 1050TI would be decent options if you can find them used.

EDIT. Looks like it's spec'd for 16A on the 12V rail... so 192W.
What are the risks to using an underpowered PSU? Like damage to hardware, slower speeds, etc?
 
What are the risks to using an underpowered PSU? Like damage to hardware, slower speeds, etc?
By and large if there is any significant difference in the output and required it just won't start.
If it's really close and does manage to start you are likely looking at what might be considered random shutdown. Beyond that it does run some risk of damage to components for lack of voltage/amperage.
 
In a situation like this, buying parts to upgrade that are going to turn on you, in that you are spending money finding specialized components that are only going to work with that specialized case. When you decide to move on you have that much more into a case that is by and large designed to be a dead end for "upgrades". It was designed and built to be a low power office machine.
In a situation like this, rather than chase a solution for use outside design spec, it would be more productive to turn that energy towards another build fitting your use case.
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
It's a little unconventional, but that board could be migrated to a new case - provided you account for the overhang on the right.

Front panel connectors would likely get interesting, but should be doable to set up.
You'd need a 24pin to 6pin adapter to utilize a standard PSU, but those are cheap:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/24-To-8Pin-ATX-Dell-Optiplex-3020-7020-Power-Supply-Motherboard-Adapter-Cable-WF/362889248604?hash=item547de27f5c:g:tnkAAOSwerZeJrRI

Looks like the board would need an ATX case....
New case + PSU + adapter.
Maybe a ~$110 investment

PCPartPicker Part List

Case: Antec VSK4000E U3 ATX Mid Tower Case ($43.19 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair CX (2017) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($58.58 @ Amazon)
Total: $101.77
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-01-23 10:52 EST-0500


Or you could look to a case that you'd want to reuse in future, opposed to something overly cheap.
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
Depends what you quantify as forming a "new" PC.
If you're keeping the majority (CPU, MB, RAM, Storage), I wouldn't consider it a 'new' system.

Equally, if you wanted to build 'new', there isn't much I'd consider reusing from that system.
I wouldn't buy a new motherboard for an i5-7400, as you're looking at probably $70 minimum for one.
You could reuse the storage and RAM, but that would be better served remaining with the Inspiron if you were looking to sell it.
 

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