Question Is it possible to split my Coax connection AFTER it reaches my modem?

Oct 17, 2021
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So my line is connected to a very congested node on already very old and poor quality wiring. Splitting the connection between my modem and TV creates more disruption to what already is a horrible line. When I connect the coax directly to the modem, although it's not life changing, it's a significantly noticeable jump from using a splitter (it's a high quality splitter). Is there any way I can connect my coax directly to the modem, then split the connection to the TV AFTER it has already reached my modem?

Correct me if I'm wrong but I was thinking an ethernet to coax adapter would do the trick? Putting an ethernet to coax adapter in my router and then putting a coax from the adapter into the cable box (tv box) would work, no?

Or perhaps maybe MoCA adapter(s)? Would I be able to connect an ethernet from my router to the MoCA adapter, then a coax from the MoCA adapter to the cable box (tv box)?

Any help to bypass the splitter to get a direct line to the modem but still use the TV and modem would be appreciated, thanks.
 
the way ours is setup is a direct connection into the building that is coaxial.
this is split with a simple ISP provided 2-way splitter between modem & cable box.
then modem to router via Ethernet.
all other connected devices connect to the router via Ethernet or wireless.
everything gets full bandwidth separately with no issues.

if this type of setup isn't working for you you should contact the ISP and have them come out and see what the issue(s) may be.

could be you just need a better ISP if this "disruption" is really noticeable on all connected devices.
 
Oct 17, 2021
3
1
10
0
the way ours is setup is a direct connection into the building that is coaxial.
this is split with a simple ISP provided 2-way splitter between modem & cable box.
then modem to router via Ethernet.
all other connected devices connect to the router via Ethernet or wireless.
everything gets full bandwidth separately with no issues.

if this type of setup isn't working for you you should contact the ISP and have them come out and see what the issue(s) may be.

could be you just need a better ISP if this "disruption" is really noticeable on all connected devices.
ISP support is next to useless unfortunately. I am currently running the same setup as you but want to bypass the splitter entirely and go directly to the modem but still be able to use the TV. I've looked into it more and it looks like a MoCA adapter would potentially be the way to go.

A MoCA adapter allows you to convert ethernet signal to coax signal and is often used along side another MoCA adapter to then convert coax signal back into ethernet. This way, people can treat the coax wiring in their walls as if they were just ethernet cables and transfer signal through it across large distances.

If I only use one adapter, this would (I think) allow me to do the following:

Coax from wall --> modem --> ethernet --> router --> ethernet --> MoCA adapter --> adapter converts ethernet back to coax --> coax cable --> cable tv box

I'm going to give this a try soon and see what happens
 
Won't work. Moca does far more than just convert one kind of wire to another.

In addition the cable tv signals do not pass through your modem. The modem converts the internet data signal which is running on docsis to ethernet. The cable tv signals may reside on the same physical cable but they are in different frequency bands. The modem actually filters these out to get the data signals.

So as soon as the signal passes into the modem all the cable signals are gone.

The moca just add another level of filtering. Lets say instead you wanted to do wall----moca----ethernet----moca---cable modem---router. The moca adapters would in this case filer the docsis signals and the cable tv signals.

All three types of signals can coexist on a coax cable but they are all actually completely different and separate signals on the wire. You have almost no other option but to use splitters.

Your best option is to call the cable company and tell them to fix it so it works or you are going to cable the tv package. You might want to consider that anyway. Many of the other options for watching tv shows over the internet are much cheaper since most people only watch a tiny fraction of the shows on a cable tv system.
 

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