Question Is it possible to undervolt an HP Omen 17" laptop with a i7-10750H CPU?

Aug 7, 2020
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I recently bought this laptop here: https://support.hp.com/hr-en/document/c06656423

As you can see, it has an i7-10750H for a CPU and because I currently experience latency and audio crackling issues in real-time audio recording applications with a professional universal audio apollo x8 audio interface (it's due to thermal throttling of the CPU/GPU) I wanted to try to undervolt route so as to never enter the 90° temperature zone.

Only problem is that the HP Omen laptop doesn't have an extensive BIOS and it only allows for small and insignificant changes, certainly nothing's in there that would change the CPU/RAM voltages etc. I read somewhere that the 10750H doesn't allow undervolting as previous versions did but I'm not sure if this is accurate information.

Any way circumvent this issue by other means or is there maybe a possibility to go the undervolting route?

Thanks!
 
Aug 7, 2020
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If the BIOS doesn't let you undervolt it's for a good reason. The last time I saw someone try to undervolt their laptop the laptop just gave a blackscreen when booting up.
Is there any other way to fix this temperature throttling issue? I already tried a laptop cooling pad by cooler master and it didn't help all that much. The laptop was still throttling after 10 minutes of audio recording...
 
I recently read that the 10th gen CPU’s do not allow undervolting, no BIOS’s support it. I have a 9th gen cpu and undervolting is locked out in newer BIOS’s, you have to use an older BIOS. Apparently the unlocked voltage was a security issue which Intel pushed out a ‘fix’ for. I use an earlier BIOS and accept the security issue. Not being able to undervolt is a big disadvantage, it’s the only way to tame my 9750h and the 10750h is near enough the same cpu.
 
Aug 7, 2020
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Is this really possible? A new mid-tier 2020 laptop with a decent CPU, RAM and GPU is not able to do live audio recordings without breaking a sweat? I mean, laptop's 10 years ago were able to do that in such a capacity that many recording engineers actually had laptop rigs...
 
Is this really possible? A new mid-tier 2020 laptop with a decent CPU, RAM and GPU is not able to do live audio recordings without breaking a sweat? I mean, laptop's 10 years ago were able to do that in such a capacity that many recording engineers actually had laptop rigs...
Overheating on modern Intel’s is nearly expected, especially on the i7’s. It takes a laptop with exceptional cooling not to have overheating problems. If you have the option return the laptop and go with a new AMD 4000 series cpu but you still must check reviews as some laptop models have skimped on cooling. The new AMD 4000 series are far superior and use less power and produce less heat as long as the manufacturer does not take short cuts with cooling.
 
Aug 7, 2020
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Overheating on modern Intel’s is nearly expected, especially on the i7’s. It takes a laptop with exceptional cooling not to have overheating problems. If you have the option return the laptop and go with a new AMD 4000 series cpu but you still must check reviews as some laptop models have skimped on cooling. The new AMD 4000 series are far superior and use less power and produce less heat as long as the manufacturer does not take short cuts with cooling.
I'm not sure if the new AMD 4000 supports Thunderbolt 3. My audio interface relies on TB3, so I'd most probably have to stick to Intel CPUs.

So there's basically nothing that could prevent thermal throttling save for using it in a liquid nitrogen enclosure?
 

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