Question Is it the GTX 1070 Graphics card that's the problem?

Jul 21, 2020
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My Son recently purchased a Gigabyte GTX 1070 graphics card.
He uses Windows 10 64bit with a CPU AMD FX(tm) 4100 quad.
The problems he's having with online gaming. Ghost Recon - wildlands and Titanfall2. Others he's hasn't tested yet.
Whilst playing, the monitor goes blank, with the game still running in the background. Then the signal is lost and the computer then freezes (Numlock stays on)
I've heard that the CPU could be the problem through this site, but on testing the cpu during a game, the temp stays at about 36°.
Something to add, is that we've had to use a 6pin to 8pin adapter for the card's power.
I used to have a piece of software which tested the graphics cards, putting it through various scenarios, but I don't have the anymore.
Any advice would be great, thanks.
 
" we've had to use a 6pin to 8pin adapter for the card's power. "

I wouldn't do this.

First off...because you are potentially putting "8 conductors worth of current" through 6 conductors....your voltage drop will be higher....and you voltage at the card will be lower.

Second....if you are using a power supply without an 8 pin plug...there is a good chance it's not the proper PSU to be using to begin with.
 

MadsModsat

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Oct 10, 2019
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What is the exact make and model of the current power supply, and how old is it?

The problems you are experiencing, are sometimes seen when a power supply isn't adequate for the system it powers.

The fact that you had to use an adaptor to power the GPU, which it is never recommended to do, points to the PSU being at fault as well.

When a power supply doesn't have the required connectors, it is usually an indication that the PSU is not sufficiently powerful, it is old, or of poor quality.. -or a mix of all three.
In any of these cases, the PSU needs to be replaced with a decent quality new unit, which has the required connectors for your setup.

I'd definately recommended testing the PC with a proper power supply, one which is known to be working and of sufficient quality and performance to power the system, in order to rule out or confirm wheter it is the PSU which is causing the problems you are currently experiencing (which I highly suspect).

Avoid using the computer until the PSU has been ruled out, because a PSU can fail when being pushed beyond its limits, and when a Power supply fails, it can cause permanent irreperable damage to other compenents, such as the graphics card or motherboard, and that could be exepsnive to replace.

Only when you are sure the PSU is good, and can power the setup safely, would I proceed with further troubleshooting, to avoid causing further damage while using a potentially bad PSU.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: brewcrew650

RTX 2080

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Jun 8, 2020
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" we've had to use a 6pin to 8pin adapter for the card's power. "

I wouldn't do this.

First off...because you are potentially putting "8 conductors worth of current" through 6 conductors....your voltage drop will be higher....and you voltage at the card will be lower.

Second....if you are using a power supply without an 8 pin plug...there is a good chance it's not the proper PSU to be using to begin with.
What is the exact make and model of the current power supply, and how old is it?

The problems you are experiencing, are sometimes seen when a power supply isn't adequate for the system it powers.

The fact that you had to use an adapter, which is is never recommended to do, points to the PSU being at fault as well.

When a power supply doesn't have the required connectors, it is usually an indication that the PSU is not sufficiently powerful, it is old, or of poor quality.. -or a mix of all three.

I'd definitely recommended testing the PC with a proper power supply, which is known to be working and of sufficient quality and performance to power the system, in order to rule out or confirm whether it is the PSU which is causing the problems (which I highly suspect).

Avoid using the computer until the PSU has been ruled out, because a PSU can fail when being pushed beyond its limits, and when a Power supply fails, it can cause permanent irreparable damage to other components, such as the graphics card or motherboard, and that could be expensive to replace.

Only when you are sure the PSU is good, and can power the setup safely, would I proceed with further troubleshooting, to avoid causing further damage while using a potentially bad PSU.
All of this 100%.

Additionally, I find it strange that the CPU temp would be 36 degrees in-game; that sounds more like CPU temp at idle. Perhaps you should check your temperatures another way. Hwmonitor can be downloaded and installed for free and will tell you the highest temperature achieved by your CPU over a period of time, such as while gaming.
 
Jul 21, 2020
6
0
10
0
What is the exact make and model of the current power supply, and how old is it?

The problems you are experiencing, are sometimes seen when a power supply isn't adequate for the system it powers.

The fact that you had to use an adaptor to power the GPU, which it is never recommended to do, points to the PSU being at fault as well.

When a power supply doesn't have the required connectors, it is usually an indication that the PSU is not sufficiently powerful, it is old, or of poor quality.. -or a mix of all three.
In any of these cases, the PSU needs to be replaced with a decent quality new unit, which has the required connectors for your setup.

I'd definately recommended testing the PC with a proper power supply, one which is known to be working and of sufficient quality and performance to power the system, in order to rule out or confirm wheter it is the PSU which is causing the problems you are currently experiencing (which I highly suspect).

Avoid using the computer until the PSU has been ruled out, because a PSU can fail when being pushed beyond its limits, and when a Power supply fails, it can cause permanent irreperable damage to other compenents, such as the graphics card or motherboard, and that could be exepsnive to replace.

Only when you are sure the PSU is good, and can power the setup safely, would I proceed with further troubleshooting, to avoid causing further damage while using a potentially bad PSU.
He's using a 500w power supply and from what I've read up, it's powerful enough.
So what if he used a 8 connector, which connects to his existing power supply, if you know what I mean?
 

bignastyid

Titan
Moderator
So a horrible and dangerous generic psu and a molex to pci-e adapter. That's a recipe for a house fire.

What you need is a decent PSU that has the proper connections on it.

Btw the generic ATX-500 units are only rated for 264w where it counts(12v rail), so it is not to proper power the system and continuing to stress it can leave you with a box of fried fried computer parts.
 
Jul 21, 2020
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The power supply he replaced it with was an ACE, Model: A-500BR. Is that a better model.
Oh and thank you so much for the help you're giving me!!!
 

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