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Question Is it worth investing in this PC?

Laura_39

Reputable
Aug 19, 2016
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Hey guys,
I have a Dell Inspirion 3670, bought back in February, and thought it would be a good starter gaming PC. I purchased a Corsair CX 550M psu and attempted to install it, to no avail, and soon discovered that the case and power supply are completely proprietary. The fan is facing the rear (plug) end. An aftermarket unit simply didn't work, there is no room for ventilation.

Frustrated. I gave up, and decided to part out the computer, took the i3-8100, and 1TB Hard drive, and decided to build my own system, but still haven't decided what to do with this sad excuse for a computer. I honestly don't know if I should dump any money into it at this point.

Thinking maybe throw in a Pentium G5500, or 5600, install 8gb single stick of ram, and a 120gb SSD, or should I just sell the remaining components on eBay?
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
Ebay I suppose, though these are new enough that Dell is probably still selling refurbished parts and whole units. Anyone looking for a cheap computer would want it working, and very cheap, so without volume probably not much to gain.

Maybe try selling locally. Or find a buyer that needs a simple desktop and then build out the remainder with their money.
 

Laura_39

Reputable
Aug 19, 2016
16
0
4,510
0
Ebay I suppose, though these are new enough that Dell is probably still selling refurbished parts and whole units. Anyone looking for a cheap computer would want it working, and very cheap, so without volume probably not much to gain.

Maybe try selling locally. Or find a buyer that needs a simple desktop and then build out the remainder with their money.
Would these parts work? Maybe sell the desktop for around $300 after the re-build is done? CPU: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0793BQS3R/?coliid=IS8XL1NSBRC2J&colid=1E50U5OF26JTN&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it
and
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N6JQS8C/?coliid=I3E7C74QCDT0AX&colid=1E50U5OF26JTN&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it
RAM: https://www.amazon.com/CORSAIR-Vengeance-2400MHz-PC4-19200-Memory/dp/B01ARHBBPS/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=8GB+1X8GB+DDR4+2400&qid=1573254817&refinements=p_36:1253504011&rnid=386442011&s=electronics&sr=1-2
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
4GB of ram is a pretty hard sell. I only see a few of the cheapest laptop models offering that.

If you aren't selling this to someone you know, going to have to make it look worth buying. Not that it isn't, I have a i3 desktop running my TV, which is basically what the newer Pentiums are now.
 
Last edited:

Laura_39

Reputable
Aug 19, 2016
16
0
4,510
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4GB of ram is a pretty hard sell. I only see a few of the cheapest laptop models offering that.

If you aren't selling this to someone one you know, going to have to make it look worth buying. Not that it isn't, I have a i3 desktop running my TV, which is basically what the newer Pentiums are now.
8gb of ram is usually the standard now a days. I am planning on selling this through craigslist or a Facebook garage sale group. Well, lesson learned. Never buying a brand name PC ever again. You used to be able to mod the heck out of these things, but even companies like HP, Lenovo, and Acer are following suit and going with proprietary parts.
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
Been that way for a long time now. I would say since the Core 2 duo days and all the mergers. They usually have two lines, one for business and one for consumers. Consumers will still have proprietary stuff, but typically have standard ATX supplies, unless they are small form factor. And there was that whole BTX era, still really not sure what the point of that was. Not technically proprietary, but no one was making retail BTX compatible graphics cards for example. Single slot or nothing essentially.

Only non-proprietary desktop PCs are basically ASUS. since they just tend to use their own off the shelf parts.

Acer = Commodore, Packard Bell, E-machine, Gateway and a few others.
Dell/Alienware
HP/Compaq (DEC as well, but you have to go back a ways to remember them) HP did a lot of vertical integration, buying out system builders and distributors.

Besides, desktops are now low volume. Businesses buy them mostly, so it makes some sense. Not a huge fan of getting locked into support contracts, but big companies tend to do that anyway.
 
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